Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 51

Thread: drones

  1. #16
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    'Springtime' on the Carters (Somerville, MA)
    Posts
    1,911
    Quote Originally Posted by thegibba View Post
    This needs to be re written/ edited . I'm not exactly sure what you mean here. I'm sure it's a small typo but it makes no sense as is.
    Be vs being. It's a comment on film vs digital, and poking fun at hipsters who are known for using older technology (Polaroids, pin-hole, etc). I tried to add some clarity, but this might not be the target demographic for such humor.
    | 63.0% W48: 19/48
    Trail Adopter of the Guinea Pond Trail

  2. #17
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,492
    Quote Originally Posted by TJsName View Post
    It is not a reasonable expectation to assume privacy in a public space.
    The guy's wife is "doing her business" in the bushes out of view and this is not an invasion of personal privacy?? No offense but I totally disagree with you there. I wouldn't expect some guy to be taking cell phone video of me over the top of the stall in a "public" restroom. Am I not entitled to a "reasonable expectation of privacy" in that "public" space?? Just because I am not in the confines of my home does not give you the right to do whatever the hell you want.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  3. #18
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,806
    Bird bolo: + legal, cheap and light / - will take a lot of practice to develop skill, limited range

    Netgun: + legal, reasonably portable, accurate / - expensive, still somewhat limited range

    Net deploying 12 ga rounds: + accurate, long range, reasonably portable / - expensive (if you don't already have the 12 ga), legality questionable (even though not technically a "lethal" round)

    EMP projectors: + safe, legal, very effective / - technology still in development, expensive, generally big and heavy

  4. #19
    Member Greenmountaingoat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Essex VT
    Posts
    30
    Wow, haven't run into this issue yet. I would go from intrigued to annoyed pretty quickly- especially as described in the opening post. My aim is iffy beyond 100' but I'd likely try to down it with a rock if it were invading her privacy.
    NH 31/48 ADK 26/46 NE 65/115

  5. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    5,798
    Quote Originally Posted by TCD View Post
    Bird bolo: + legal, cheap and light / - will take a lot of practice to develop skill, limited range

    Netgun: + legal, reasonably portable, accurate / - expensive, still somewhat limited range

    Net deploying 12 ga rounds: + accurate, long range, reasonably portable / - expensive (if you don't already have the 12 ga), legality questionable (even though not technically a "lethal" round)

    EMP projectors: + safe, legal, very effective / - technology still in development, expensive, generally big and heavy
    Sorry FAA has been pretty specific, private citizens cannot mess with drones therefore no method of downing a drone is legal. Note that reportedly the US military has deployed anti drone equipment in the various actions against ISIS.

  6. #21
    Junior Member Greenpoint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    15
    Thanks for all the support. Hopefully this idea of spying on people will die down.

  7. #22
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    'Springtime' on the Carters (Somerville, MA)
    Posts
    1,911
    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    No offense but I totally disagree with you there. I wouldn't expect some guy to be taking cell phone video of me over the top of the stall in a "public" restroom. Am I not entitled to a "reasonable expectation of privacy" in that "public" space?? Just because I am not in the confines of my home does not give you the right to do whatever the hell you want.
    No offense taken - I really enjoy the spirited conversations we get to have here; however, I don't think my argument ever advocated that outside of one's private residence that one can do anything they want - that feels like a disingenuous representation of my point.

    To your point, a public restroom is distinct from being out in public. There is a reasonable expectation of privacy within the confines of public restrooms. It's interesting to think about public restrooms from other perspectives. For example, what if someone were having sex with a prostitute in a public restroom (say a single use bathroom with a lock) - would the police need a warrant to 'search' it, even if there is reasonable suspicion of an illegal activity taking place? I'm not sure of the answer to that, but it's interesting to think about privacy from multiple vantage points. Now, what if someone was peeing outside of a public restroom - say on the ground next to the entrance to it - should they have an expectation of privacy? How far does one have to get away from the bathroom, while remaining in a public space, before a legal expectation of privacy returns?

    Don't get me wrong - it's not as though I don't find it creepy that someone might want to take pictures or record a video of someone else going to the bathroom. I'm not commenting on the motivations of the drone operator. My point is about what people's expectations should be. If two people go off trail to have consensual sex, should they have the same expectation of privacy as if they were just peeing? Since anyone can walk anywhere on public lands, so I would argue there should be no expectoration of privacy for either act.
    | 63.0% W48: 19/48
    Trail Adopter of the Guinea Pond Trail

  8. #23
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    'Springtime' on the Carters (Somerville, MA)
    Posts
    1,911
    Quote Originally Posted by Greenpoint View Post
    Thanks for all the support. Hopefully this idea of spying on people will die down.
    My apologies if my comments come off cold or indifferent - I'm truly sorry to hear that you had an unpleasant experience. Sadly, I doubt the use of drones for nefarious purposes will die down naturally. It'll likely lead to regulations. Here an interesting article on it from this past March: https://www.recode.net/2017/3/15/149...senate-hearing. Spying into private residences appears to be the main concern right now, but any laws passed could have implications for public spaces too.
    | 63.0% W48: 19/48
    Trail Adopter of the Guinea Pond Trail

  9. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    331
    I hope that people will realize that it is selfish to fly a whiny drone around other people, especially on a viewpoint others are sharing. Is it all that necessary to have a selfie video from your drone? With that said. they have many uses for people who work on the land, but those uses are becoming subject to reasonable restriction such as altitude, daylight flight, etc.

  10. #25
    Senior Member ExploreTheEast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Location: Back in NJ Avatar: Buckskin Gulch
    Posts
    243
    I'm a drone operator, even out in the wilderness sometimes (but not the "Wilderness" if you know what I mean). I guess I'm not surprised by the negativity surrounding their use in the Whites. I haven't flown there yet, but I do hope to someday. In fact, I can't think of a place on the East Coast that I'd like to photograph (from the air) more than that area.

    Other than the noise, which doesn't mean too much to me as far as a complaint (It's up there with jeans, cellphones, and dogs... I just don't care how other people enjoy nature as long as they're not physically destroying it), I don't mind them. At least a drone battery dies in about 20 minutes! Some people can sing (loudly and badly) for hours. Before I moved east again, I had been buzzed at least a few times out west. I usually just wave to them. Then for weeks afterwards I'd search youtube for "idiot waving to sky" to see if I can find it posted anywhere. No luck yet...

    Anyway, getting to the point, anyone that has bothered to register their drone for recreational flight (which was a requirement until just last week when it got shot down by the courts, no pun intended, haha) had to learn some very basic rules that the FAA had set for recreational done pilots. One of those rules is "Don't fly directly over crowds of people," so if you see someone doing that, I'd say it's within your right to complain to them about it. They're literally putting you in danger.

    As far as the privacy and all that, I can't really agree with that. The drone cameras (of today, anyway) are likely not what you think they are. I actually had a "privacy" incident pretty recently with some elementary school staff while on a commercial drone shoot. I was taking photos and video of a building, and to get the building in the shot, I had to back up the drone far enough for it to fit in the frame. Right over the elementary school property. I know, the horror. So I'm flying over there when some teachers come over towards the parking lot that I'm flying from, and are all "you can't fly over school property" (I definitely can, it's perfectly legal), and "why are you taking photos of the kids on the playground," which at first I thought was pretty ridiculous. But only a few seconds later, I remembered that they don't know what I can see. It's only from my own personal experience flying/shooting that I know it's ridiculous.

    So after I explained the actual law to them regarding what I can and cannot fly over, I asked them to stick around so I could show them the photos that I had just taken. Photos of myself, because I'm standing in the parking lot, so I'm definitely in them. Upon landing, I went through all the shots, pointing out my position in each one. I'll attach one here for all the conspiracy theorists. haha

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DJI_0017.jpg 
Views:	119 
Size:	59.8 KB 
ID:	5800

    I post this so you can see what the drone operator will be seeing later on when he's selling your photos to US Weekly for BIG bucks. This is 80 feet. You can see me circled on the left, and you can see the full size 12mp crop on the right. I'm basically Mario from the classic NES Super Mario Bros. You may notice that it's not exactly super spy quality. In the photos from my preferred shooting altitude (350 feet), I'm basically reduced to a few grey/blue pixels. You can't even tell it's a person.

    Now, maybe I have no modesty (did I say maybe? I meant probably), but I'd let someone take as many photos of me as they'd like from this distance. This is a very standard semi-professional drone setup (DJI Inspire) as far as the resolution and the focal length (zoom) of the lens, so you can expect most drones to offer similar quality. Drones aren't the NSA. (Yet.) If they're flying at about telephone pole height, you might have something to worry about. But any higher than that, and you're probably overreacting just a little bit when it comes to privacy. Are there drones that have a higher resolution and more zoom? Sure. But usually the people that have invested the $10k to purchase one of those drones are professionals that are well-versed in the law, and I would imagine they use it as a professional would use a tool. No different than a photographer with an 800mm zoom lens. He bought that lens do capture the best ever photo of a marmot's nose hair for National Geographic. He's probably not interested in getting close up of me taking a shit. Can I say shit in here? It's been awhile. Anyway, hopefully this is of some help. Happy hiking/flying!

  11. #26
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    414
    I think drones are a perfect example of how technology outran the law. Right now drone use is very lightly regulated but given that for many drone users privacy of other people seems of little concern I expect that regulation will slowly creep in one way or another. I think eventually drones will not only require registration but they will have to broadcast their "digital license plates" over WiFi, so that anyone with a smartphone will be able to identify offending drone ID and report it to appropriate authorities.

    FAA appears to "side" with drone owners right now, but I think this is really just driven by desire not to give land owners any rights to the air space over their land.

  12. #27
    Junior Member Greenpoint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    15
    We were the only hikers on the mountaintop. The drone that hovered over my wife was 30 to 40 feet over her as she went to the bathroom. What do you think the purpose of this view was for the drone operator?
    Last edited by Greenpoint; 06-01-2017 at 05:35 AM.

  13. #28
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Posts
    2,401
    Quote Originally Posted by Greenpoint View Post
    We were the only hikers on the mountaintop. The drone that hovered over my wife was 30 to 40 feet over her as she went to the bathroom. What do you think the purpose of this view was for the drone operator?
    Very possible that the Drone was spying on your wife and if it was that is just rude on many levels. Although just because the Drone was overhead does not conclusively mean that the Camera on the drone was aimed at your Wife. Many Drones have what is called a "Gimble" which allows the operator to manipulate the angle of the camera. Most operators in my experience in a situation like this would be flying to capture the landscape view which would be much more on a horizontal view rather than what would be directly below them. No one would be able to say for sure what was actually captured without reviewing the footage. I would concur with Explore the East that even if the Camera was pointed down at your wife at 30-40 feet the level of detail would not be anywhere close to revealing.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  14. #29
    Senior Member jrbren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    W.Boylston, MA
    Posts
    318
    Despite some of the beautiful footage I see from drones on U-Tube, I fully support banning their use in Wilderness area. I disagree that one cannot expect a certain level of privacy just because the land is publicly owned. I'ld be lying if I said it would not be fun to create my own wilderness videos like this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTy0TNEBlNg, but not at the cost of destroying the wilderness feeling for others. 1 or 2 drones a day passing by would not bother me, but no one rain drop is responsible for the flood. 1 drone hovering over head would annoy the p1ss out of me. I would liken that to me going to the edge of someone's campsite and just staring at them for an hour (hey, its public land, they should not expect any privacy?). I do not think it's illegal, but incredibly bad form. I have never been successful asking anyone to turn their music down, I have no reason to believe "talking to the owner" would get other response then "f-off, I can do what I want, free country". I do not believe the owner would not already be aware of what they are doing and what the impact to others is.

  15. #30
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New hampshire
    Posts
    2,583
    Quote Originally Posted by ExploreTheEast View Post
    I'm a drone operator, even out in the wilderness sometimes (but not the "Wilderness" if you know what I mean). I guess I'm not surprised by the negativity surrounding their use in the Whites. I haven't flown there yet, but I do hope to someday. In fact, I can't think of a place on the East Coast that I'd like to photograph (from the air) more than that area.

    Other than the noise, which doesn't mean too much to me as far as a complaint (It's up there with jeans, cellphones, and dogs... I just don't care how other people enjoy nature as long as they're not physically destroying it), I don't mind them. At least a drone battery dies in about 20 minutes! Some people can sing (loudly and badly) for hours. Before I moved east again, I had been buzzed at least a few times out west. I usually just wave to them. Then for weeks afterwards I'd search youtube for "idiot waving to sky" to see if I can find it posted anywhere. No luck yet...

    Anyway, getting to the point, anyone that has bothered to register their drone for recreational flight (which was a requirement until just last week when it got shot down by the courts, no pun intended, haha) had to learn some very basic rules that the FAA had set for recreational done pilots. One of those rules is "Don't fly directly over crowds of people," so if you see someone doing that, I'd say it's within your right to complain to them about it. They're literally putting you in danger.

    As far as the privacy and all that, I can't really agree with that. The drone cameras (of today, anyway) are likely not what you think they are. I actually had a "privacy" incident pretty recently with some elementary school staff while on a commercial drone shoot. I was taking photos and video of a building, and to get the building in the shot, I had to back up the drone far enough for it to fit in the frame. Right over the elementary school property. I know, the horror. So I'm flying over there when some teachers come over towards the parking lot that I'm flying from, and are all "you can't fly over school property" (I definitely can, it's perfectly legal), and "why are you taking photos of the kids on the playground," which at first I thought was pretty ridiculous. But only a few seconds later, I remembered that they don't know what I can see. It's only from my own personal experience flying/shooting that I know it's ridiculous.

    So after I explained the actual law to them regarding what I can and cannot fly over, I asked them to stick around so I could show them the photos that I had just taken. Photos of myself, because I'm standing in the parking lot, so I'm definitely in them. Upon landing, I went through all the shots, pointing out my position in each one. I'll attach one here for all the conspiracy theorists. haha

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DJI_0017.jpg 
Views:	119 
Size:	59.8 KB 
ID:	5800

    I post this so you can see what the drone operator will be seeing later on when he's selling your photos to US Weekly for BIG bucks. This is 80 feet. You can see me circled on the left, and you can see the full size 12mp crop on the right. I'm basically Mario from the classic NES Super Mario Bros. You may notice that it's not exactly super spy quality. In the photos from my preferred shooting altitude (350 feet), I'm basically reduced to a few grey/blue pixels. You can't even tell it's a person.

    Now, maybe I have no modesty (did I say maybe? I meant probably), but I'd let someone take as many photos of me as they'd like from this distance. This is a very standard semi-professional drone setup (DJI Inspire) as far as the resolution and the focal length (zoom) of the lens, so you can expect most drones to offer similar quality. Drones aren't the NSA. (Yet.) If they're flying at about telephone pole height, you might have something to worry about. But any higher than that, and you're probably overreacting just a little bit when it comes to privacy. Are there drones that have a higher resolution and more zoom? Sure. But usually the people that have invested the $10k to purchase one of those drones are professionals that are well-versed in the law, and I would imagine they use it as a professional would use a tool. No different than a photographer with an 800mm zoom lens. He bought that lens do capture the best ever photo of a marmot's nose hair for National Geographic. He's probably not interested in getting close up of me taking a shit. Can I say shit in here? It's been awhile. Anyway, hopefully this is of some help. Happy hiking/flying!
    I confess to knowing little about drones, so your piece was educational. While the noise may not bother you, I find it curious, the way you say, if it's not destroying nature, I don't worry about it. Some would say, a whiney Drone, does just that, destroy thier Wilderness experience. One must, if considerate, try to understand how they may impact other's experience. My dog is leashed for that very reason, not everybody likes dogs. I try not to have him bother non dog lovers. As far as the privacy issue, I'm personally not worried about that myself, me and my dog have been photographed a lot, (granted they ask first). To me, a Drone is no different then carrying a boom box on your shoulder, but that's just my opinion. I have not seen any up high, so it's not even an issue to me yet. I saw one buzzing around the Highland Center, so I have experienced them up close. My verdict, they are annoying as hell. Would I do anything about it if I saw someone using one up high? No, I wouldn't. Its up to the law to handle that. My guess is, that IF and that's a big if, they become very popular, they will be banned from the National Forest, but that is mere speculation on my part. Over the years, its always something new. Many just fade away as non issues. Time will tell where this one falls, (pun intended).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •