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Thread: A Thread About Favorite Mountains!

  1. #16
    Senior Member Driver8's Avatar
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    Chocorua is particularly beautiful from the Ike/Pierce direction, its summit sticking up like an index finger. I had hoped to enjoy the view of it across Chocorua Lake in Fall '15 when I drove past, but it was clouded in that day.

    I didn't mention another enchanting mountain which I enjoyed very much in September '13 and immediately wanted to do many more times (not all mountains leave one with that feeling): Camel's Hump, which beguiled me by staying socked in above 3500' as long as I was in that zone, only to wink at me free of clouds in my rearview mirror as I climbed out of the valley southward on 89. I went up the standard east-side Monroe/LT route and basked in the ethereal beauty of the foggy alpine zone. Looking forward to climbing it on a clear day, perhaps from the west, and soaking in views in all directions.

    Also, Ellen, which I climbed in September 2015, was singularly beautiful above 3500', though I took the less wild ski trails route up. Expansive views. Northward to Camel's Hump, Mansfield &co., west across Champlain to the ice castle Adirondacks, east to giants Moosilauke, F Ridge and the Presis. Super pretty place on a sweet autumn day.
    Last edited by Driver8; 07-13-2017 at 12:37 AM.
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  2. #17
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    For the Whites, my favorite are Isolation and Carrigain for the views. Tecumseh because that it the only one where I went all day and didn't see another person.

    But my real favorite is one I haven't climbed yet. The one that always gets away.... I take a group of college students to Ecuador every year for a volunteer water project in a small community in the Andes. We've been up all the mountains (8000+ ft) in our valley assessing water supply. All except one. There's one giant that looms over the community and is almost always shrouded in clouds (10,000+ft). My students affectionately call it Mt. Doom, but really it's something like Akakana. The locals claim the top is a spiritual site. Every year we say we're going to climb it, and every year we're foiled by weather, or schedule, or some festival that is more important we attend. It's been 5 years and I still haven't been to the top. One of these days...

  3. #18
    Senior Member injektilo's Avatar
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    I have several "favorites"...Little Jackson, Saddleback/The Horn, Abraham, anything in BSP. I'm quite fond of both Madison and Adams in NH. If I had to pick one though, it would probably be Bigelow Mountain. There are several varied approaches to a number of summits along the long ridge, not one but two beautiful elevated ponds, and the view north over Flagstaff with the seemingly unending carpet of forest is unrivaled in New England in my opinion.

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  4. #19
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    Mt Monadnock
    The crowds have never bothered me since I don't hike Monadnock expecting to find solitude. That said, I have had the summit to myself on a number of occasions & rarely meet anyone on the Sidefoot or any of the trails from there up to Bald Rock.
    I can do a quick up and back in an afternoon from my home in Central MA.
    I can make a day of it by combining trails on the Pumpelly ridge with the Halfway House trails.
    It's open summit and ledges make for an icy challenge in the winter.
    Almost all of my hiking lessons took place on various hikes on Monadnock - cotton t-shirt and jeans, not enough water, forgotten rain gear, forgotten bug spray, rock hopping in winter, softer snow in the afternoon, etc
    I love Monadnock.

  5. #20
    Senior Member Scubahhh's Avatar
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    Moosilauke via Glencliff Trail on a clear night, preferably with a full moon. The lights from Lincoln, Littleton, and others are cool and the wind farm on Cardigan is other-worldly. The sunrise is stunning.
    Add life to your years!

  6. #21
    Senior Member MikePS's Avatar
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    Three nominees- not the biggest but love Crawford all seasons in the Whites, Doubletop in Baxter, and Teton Crest from Alaska Basin in the Tetons. Of course Franconia Ridge on a quiet sunny weekday is in a category all its own. Finally, I just finished the Laugevergur trek in Iceland- truly exceptional. Great thread

  7. #22
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raven View Post
    Great answers here! Thanks for taking the time; it's good reading. A few comments:

    Jniehof: Yeah, favortites are impossible; I pick differently depending on the day sometimes. I'd likely slow you down, but I'll let you know when I'm thinking about this and will take you up the offer to join me on Adams if you are interested. I'd be happy averaging 2mph on that one. The Unitas look great - I was not familiar with the range. Very cool to see it's made of 600 million year old rock and is the only major range in the US with an East West orientation.

    Tom: You named three on my ADK list for when I get some time in NY - never done any of those but have heard great reports on all three. Mansfield is truly unique. What a gem for Vermont. Camel's Hump is pretty special too. Katahdin is Katahdin, can't argue with that. Carrigain has one of my favorite ridges (Signal Ridge) and the Desolation Trail rocks. That's a good call. And to echo you and Egilbe, the Bigelows are awesome. One of the most amazing days I've been in the mountains was on the Bigelows with a perfect undercast allowing just the 4000 foot peaks or so to poke through. It was incredible. Great range.

    Sierra: great story. I totally understand that mentality. Mountains are incredibly healing places, especially for the spirit. It's certainly my best medicine and keeps me in a healthy place on all levels. And like Katahdin, it's hard to ever argue against Washington. The mountain is another absolute gem, one of the few great, great mountains in NE. Sounds like it was more than worthy as practice ground for your experiences out west. Washington to me is a mountain I will always (hope) to climb. But the crowds have become such that in summer, I will pick my days midweek and leave either quite early or quite late. The time one chooses to hike this mountain has an impact on the experience. I've never had a bad time on the rock pile to be sure, but I selfishly pick times when I can have it in smaller company. I've had the whole summit area to myself and I've almost witnessed a fist fight at the summit sign. I love the mountain though. People are people. They're crazy around the summit sign.

    JFB: Greylock has always been a mountain I really liked as well. It's got great trails, a really great feel to the mountain, and I can see the whale shape the profile has from distance. I've heard that may have been part of Melville's inspiration for Moby Dick as he could see the mountain out his window. Lots of history. I hope to be there in September this year.

    Grey J: that is a chilling story. Thanks for sharing. You made a very wise move. The window to turn back is only open so long. It sounds so similar to a time a friend and I stayed over at the Perch with the plan to do Jefferson. It was a cold night and we woke to damp, snowy conditions with little visibility and my friend with little energy after a hard day and cold night prior. We started up to test the waters, but quickly chose the wiser decision and hiked out. We were both feeling the fatigue. Never in real danger, but real danger was only a bad choice or two away.

    Driver8: I echo those feelings on Washington. Eisenhower is another great one. This has become a hugely popular summit over the years, but I love the egg shaped dome top and have always been fond of the big cairn.

    West Bond is a favorite of mine as well, and I hiked Caribou Mountain for the first time last week. I love mountains just like that! Slab rock on top with patches of evergreens and plenty of open areas with 360 degree views. It reminds me of Hedgehog and some of the other small mountains along the Kanc. I took an hour nap on top before a young couple came along and offered me a PB&J on my way out. I appreciated the calories.

    Maine must have a few people are thinking other than the Bigelows and Katahdin. Keep it coming!
    I don't know if you really want to consider it different than Katahdin but I think the summit of Pamola Peak steals the show for me in Baxter (or at least what I have seen of it to date). I've made two trips up there as of this past weekend and maybe it was just because it was the first peak I did there but I was simply blown away as I crested the pointy, rocky top on Helon Taylor and saw the Knife Edge for the first time and the expanse of the South Basin. The shear rock walls with all the crystal clear lakes dotting the skyline. Genuine smile on my face moment. The summit of Katahdin I found very anti-climactic with it's fairly flat finish and crowds. I enjoyed it even less this time around. Katahdin is a lot like Washington for me. Lot of trails I really enjoy along the way up but I can do without that last little stretch to the summit.
    “Sometimes when you’ve lost something in your life that matters, the only thing left to do is go and find it.” Renan Ozturk

  8. #23
    Senior Member weatherman's Avatar
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    West Bond. The feeling of being suspended over a vast world of green, with few signs of civilization visible (OK, it was hazy), was incredible. The fact that it's at the end of a spur makes the magic even better.

    Out here in CO haven't found a favorite yet, they're all good, but none as green.
    --would rather be hiking than typing.

  9. #24
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    I've been thinking about this a bit, and I think Mt. Stairs is special to me.

  10. #25
    Senior Member Driver8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amy View Post
    For the Whites, my favorite are Isolation and Carrigain for the views. Tecumseh because that it the only one where I went all day and didn't see another person.

    But my real favorite is one I haven't climbed yet. The one that always gets away.... I take a group of college students to Ecuador every year for a volunteer water project in a small community in the Andes. We've been up all the mountains (8000+ ft) in our valley assessing water supply. All except one. There's one giant that looms over the community and is almost always shrouded in clouds (10,000+ft). My students affectionately call it Mt. Doom, but really it's something like Akakana. The locals claim the top is a spiritual site. Every year we say we're going to climb it, and every year we're foiled by weather, or schedule, or some festival that is more important we attend. It's been 5 years and I still haven't been to the top. One of these days...
    You'll get it one day, Amy, when it's ready for you. Funny thing how some mountains make you wait, and it's different mountains for each of us. I tried Washington twice before "sneaking up on it," unannounced, Father's Day five years ago, via the Jewell. By the time it knew I was coming, I was already there, and there was, much to my amazement, no wind to speak of as I posed for a summit photo. Turned out, it was, per the Obs, day 3 of a 5 day stretch which was the least windy in six decades. How about that?!?
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  11. #26
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weatherman View Post
    West Bond. The feeling of being suspended over a vast world of green, with few signs of civilization visible (OK, it was hazy), was incredible. The fact that it's at the end of a spur makes the magic even better.

    Out here in CO haven't found a favorite yet, they're all good, but none as green.
    Believe it or not, Mt. Bierstadt is my favorite in CO to this point. Love the road up, Guanella pass is awesome to wake up in. The mountain itself is just cool, you can go across the Sawtooth Ridge, you can get lost in the Willow field going to Evans up Goofers gully. And twice, I've had the summit to myself with goats early in the morning.

  12. #27
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    A White Mt peak that doesn't get much love or talk is Flume. As summits go, it's not big or broad but I found it to be a sharp and prominent viewpoint. Only been there once but I enjoyed the hike and appreciate that type of summit. The Osseo approach is scenic and gradual but if you want something difficult, well Flume Slide Trail certainly qualifies. It can also be part of a Franconia Ridge traverse or part of the Pemi loop. I wonder how many people climb Flume vs Lafayette? 1:100? I guess the Liberty/Flume combo is another common option. I just think it's one of your more under-utilized and possibly under-appreciated peaks.
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  13. #28
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey J View Post
    A White Mt peak that doesn't get much love or talk is Flume. As summits go, it's not big or broad but I found it to be a sharp and prominent viewpoint. Only been there once but I enjoyed the hike and appreciate that type of summit. The Osseo approach is scenic and gradual but if you want something difficult, well Flume Slide Trail certainly qualifies. It can also be part of a Franconia Ridge traverse or part of the Pemi loop. I wonder how many people climb Flume vs Lafayette? 1:100? I guess the Liberty/Flume combo is another common option. I just think it's one of your more under-utilized and possibly under-appreciated peaks.
    Flume via Osseo is actually one, I repeat fairly often. I like the RR bed at the bottom, then the transition to the meandering switchbacks, to the stairs. The area above the stairs is really cool, kind of a mellow ridge till you climb up the gully to the tiny Col. Not everyone knows it, but at the junction of the FST, if you go east, there is a small herdpath to a pretty good outlook. The final climb up that narrow ridge is really nice and can be sporty the winter.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Driver8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey J View Post
    A White Mt peak that doesn't get much love or talk is Flume. As summits go, it's not big or broad but I found it to be a sharp and prominent viewpoint. Only been there once but I enjoyed the hike and appreciate that type of summit. The Osseo approach is scenic and gradual but if you want something difficult, well Flume Slide Trail certainly qualifies. It can also be part of a Franconia Ridge traverse or part of the Pemi loop. I wonder how many people climb Flume vs Lafayette? 1:100? I guess the Liberty/Flume combo is another common option. I just think it's one of your more under-utilized and possibly under-appreciated peaks.
    It also offers, imo, a better angle on the high Franconias than Liberty, while Liberty has the prettier summits (both having a double summit, with the higher of each being inward with respect to the other). I see Liberty as having the better view overall, but Flume the better directly south, up to and between Owl's Head and Liberty/Lafayette. Both very nice, among my faves.
    Last edited by Driver8; 07-14-2017 at 10:47 PM.
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  15. #30
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    MikePS, would you be willing to answer some questions about your Iceland trip if I sent you a private message? Cheers.

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