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Thread: Woman climbs tree to escape coyotes - Near Boston!

  1. #31
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    Exactly. And 1 (one) of them was 400 ft. Away.

  2. #32
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    She only saw one.

  3. #33
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    She only saw one.
    SAUGUS, Mass. – A woman hiking on a Massachusetts reservation says coyotes surrounded her and her dog, forcing her to climb a tree to safety. Coyotes, plural. Typical “spin”. Make it seem different than what it is.
    Last edited by richard; 05-21-2018 at 04:28 PM.

  4. #34
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard View Post
    ...A woman hiking on a Massachusetts reservation says...
    Maybe this is in fact what she said. I wasn't there; I'm not going to pretend to know.

  5. #35
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard View Post
    I feel they generally get it right.
    When it's one's job to report the truth, a higher standard should be expected.
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  6. #36
    Moderator David Metsky's Avatar
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    Mod Note
    I don't think nitpicking the details of the wording of the news reports is adding anything to the discussion here. Please drop that part of the conversation.
    You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself, any direction you choose. -- Dr. Seuss

  7. #37
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Perhaps it’s a matter of perception for this women. Wether the press is sensationalizing this event or not maybe it’s just a case of being in a more urban area. Who knows what her prior experiences are. Has she been on Safari or climbed 8000 meter peaks and seen yetis and what not before. It’s entirely possible she is only a suburban citizen that has limited outdoor experience along with very little exposure to wild animals. Therefore maybe she reacted in a way she thought appropriate based upon her prior experiences.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  8. #38
    Senior Member griffin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    It’s entirely possible she is only a suburban citizen that has limited outdoor experience along with very little exposure to wild animals. Therefore maybe she reacted in a way she thought appropriate based upon her prior experiences.
    This. The first time my dog and I encountered a coyote in the Middlesex Fells, I had no idea that so many of them lived in the area, had no expectation or running into one in what I felt to be a fairly urbanized setting, and certainly no idea of how worried to be or what to do. Had it not run away from us, chances are good that my initial response might...not have been optimal.
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

  9. #39
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    http://http://nhpr.org/post/something-wild-why-coyotes-seem-be-everywhere-2#stream/0

    "To be fair the fear and anger directed coyotes also comes from the documented attacks on domestic pets. The fact is that coyotes feed on small mammals, and as generalists that sometimes means domestic cats and dogs. Schadler says the best thing we can do for coyotes is educate them. And the best time to educate them is mid- to late-May as the juveniles are emerging from their dens. “They are na´ve; they will wander up people's driveways and into people's backyards and try to play with people's dogs, kids, cats. People should haze them by chasing them being loud and making it uncomfortable for those coyotes to be anywhere near their backyard.” This will condition the coyotes to fear humans and steer well clear of us."

  10. #40
    Senior Member Barkingcat's Avatar
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    Thanks for this -- this is the most interesting aspect of this entire thread.

    This information is further reinforced in an article in today's edition of the Washington Post. The article examines the rapid spread of coyotes across this country and into other parts of the continent. Fascinating stuff.
    Last edited by Barkingcat; 05-23-2018 at 09:32 AM.

  11. #41
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    I encountered a coyote last fall at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge. When it crossed my path, I was initially annoyed that someone let their dog off leash and it slipped silently into the shrubbery before I realized that it was actually a coyote. Evidently there is an established year-round population: https://mountauburn.org/coyotes-at-mount-auburn/

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barkingcat View Post
    Thanks for this -- this is the most interesting aspect of this entire thread.

    This information is further reinforced in an article in today's edition of the Washington Post. The article examines the rapid spread of coyotes across this country and into other parts of the continent. Fascinating stuff.
    So the story of coyote migration is also the story of the loss of the wolf.

    Apex Predators

    I have read a wonderful mixed media web article on the impact of the return of apex predators to Yellowstone NP. I think it was in National Geographic.

    I found these link just now but never is the article I remember reading.

    https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/...change-rivers/

    https://nemessica.tintagel.pl/apexbl...s-perspective/

  13. #43
    Senior Member weatherman's Avatar
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    "To be fair the fear and anger directed coyotes also comes from the documented attacks on domestic pets. The fact is that coyotes feed on small mammals, and as generalists that sometimes means domestic cats and dogs. Schadler says the best thing we can do for coyotes is educate them. And the best time to educate them is mid- to late-May as the juveniles are emerging from their dens. “They are na´ve; they will wander up people's driveways and into people's backyards and try to play with people's dogs, kids, cats. People should haze them by chasing them being loud and making it uncomfortable for those coyotes to be anywhere near their backyard.” This will condition the coyotes to fear humans and steer well clear of us."


    This is a great passage. We coexist with smaller (Western) coyotes all the time IMBY. My rule is if they're in my neighborhood, I make it uncomfortable for them, and when I'm in their neighborhood (open space), I watch from a distance/ignore unless they get too close. Seems to work fine. Looking big and making it very clear that my dogs are NOT their lunch helps. I have two dogs I can pick up if need be, and a third that is twice the size of a coyote and makes them run away just by glancing in their direction.

    And the author of the NHPR article describes something I've seen them do several times before: cross streets in crosswalks, at green lights. No kidding. I saw one last November wait for a green, cross, wait at the corner for the light to turn green the perpendicular way, then cross again. If I hadn't had others in the car NOBODY would have believed me. Crazy.
    Last edited by weatherman; 05-23-2018 at 02:24 PM.
    --would rather be hiking than typing.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by weatherman View Post
    "To be fair the fear and anger directed coyotes also comes from the documented attacks on domestic pets. The fact is that coyotes feed on small mammals, and as generalists that sometimes means domestic cats and dogs. Schadler says the best thing we can do for coyotes is educate them. And the best time to educate them is mid- to late-May as the juveniles are emerging from their dens. “They are na´ve; they will wander up people's driveways and into people's backyards and try to play with people's dogs, kids, cats. People should haze them by chasing them being loud and making it uncomfortable for those coyotes to be anywhere near their backyard.” This will condition the coyotes to fear humans and steer well clear of us."


    This is a great passage. We coexist with smaller (Western) coyotes all the time IMBY. My rule is if they're in my neighborhood, I make it uncomfortable for them, and when I'm in their neighborhood (open space), I watch from a distance/ignore unless they get too close. Seems to work fine. Looking big and making it very clear that my dogs are NOT their lunch helps. I have two dogs I can pick up if need be, and a third that is twice the size of a coyote and makes them run away just by glancing in their direction.
    I do the same thing. I've chased them naked through the backyard as they tried to engage one of the dogs and admired them in the middle of a Pemi bushwhack. My cattle dog hates them and will start growling if he so much as smells one.

  15. #45
    Senior Member Snowflea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weatherman View Post
    And the author of the NHPR article describes something I've seen them do several times before: cross streets in crosswalks, at green lights. No kidding. I saw one last November wait for a green, cross, wait at the corner for the light to turn green the perpendicular way, then cross again. If I hadn't had others in the car NOBODY would have believed me. Crazy.
    One could argue that coyotes are smarter and/or more considerate than many humans then.

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