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Thread: Interesting Stream 'Crossing'

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    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Interesting Stream 'Crossing'

    Usually when we say 'stream crossing' we mean rock hopping across a stream.

    I was looking at a topo map for the area of North Brother, and I saw 2 streams cross each other!

    https://caltopo.com/map.html#ll=45.9...906&z=16&b=mbt

    You can see that it's flattish there but it does not show a pond or marsh.

    I saw this effect on a much smaller scale when runoff coming down a side hilling trail met a small stream coming straight down the slope. After merging briefly, the water kept flowing down the trail AND straight down the mountain.

    I know 2 Ocean Creek must do something like this. Are there a lot of these, and I just never noticed, or is this somewhat rare?
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    Senior Member nartreb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    Usually when we say 'stream crossing' we mean rock hopping across a stream.

    I was looking at a topo map for the area of North Brother, and I saw 2 streams cross each other!

    https://caltopo.com/map.html#ll=45.9...906&z=16&b=mbt

    You can see that it's flattish there but it does not show a pond or marsh.

    I saw this effect on a much smaller scale when runoff coming down a side hilling trail met a small stream coming straight down the slope. After merging briefly, the water kept flowing down the trail AND straight down the mountain.

    I know 2 Ocean Creek must do something like this. Are there a lot of these, and I just never noticed, or is this somewhat rare?

    "Braiding", where streams continually cross and recross, happens all the time. You can see some incipient examples just downslope on your map, and tons of it on multiple scales in any flattish river system.

    Yours is a rarer example of a true X, where the upstream branches have separate origins and the downstream branches don't recombine before hitting a third body of water.

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    Senior Member dug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nartreb View Post
    "Braiding", where streams continually cross and recross, happens all the time. You can see some incipient examples just downslope on your map, and tons of it on multiple scales in any flattish river system.

    Yours is a rarer example of a true X, where the upstream branches have separate origins and the downstream branches don't recombine before hitting a third body of water.
    That's what struck me as well. When braiding, they seem to cross, separate, and cross again often enough. These look like completely divergent paths after meeting. It does look a bit odd. Would be interesting to see a die test or a ping-pong ball test and see how well they mesh at the X.
    Last edited by dug; 03-15-2019 at 10:25 AM. Reason: new info

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    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    They could be ephemeral at the upper reaches, but the one that is NOT named Roaring Brook definitely has water in it below the X.
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    My guess is that entire range seems to be designed to slide. The upper stream is actually running down the old Marston Slide trail. (Worth a visit) When this slide let loose in history it dug the trench that runs parallel to the new Marston Slide and eventually ends up at Slide Dam ( a natural dam on Nesowadnehunk Stream caused by debris). When the old Marston Slide trail runs straight where the there is now a T junction appears to be an old debris field that has grown in. My guess is Roaring Brook may be a slide path from an older slide and when the Marston Slide slid, gravity forced a stream across the prior stream.

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    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    I assume JustJoe has a picture for us to look at. I wonder if there is a boulder dam there (or something pourus) that allows water to seep through from the main channel to feed the southwestern stream. Definitely interesting!
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    Senior Member jjmcgo's Avatar
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    Funny, you mentioned this.
    I just read within the last two weeks about two rivers that intersect near Elbag, Poland.
    https://izismile.com/2012/04/11/two_...ng_4_pics.html

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    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Here is an example of a stream splitting, you might be surprised at the location...

    https://caltopo.com/map.html#ll=44.2...571&z=17&b=mbt
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    This is really interesting. Any in New England besides the BSP location above? Would be cool to check out, particularly if off the beaten path.

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    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    Here is an example of a stream splitting, you might be surprised at the location...

    https://caltopo.com/map.html#ll=44.2...571&z=17&b=mbt
    That's interesting, Tom. Have you been to the actual location? (I have not.) Seeing as it's essentially "right in the middle of town" I wonder if there might not be some man made influence on this; perhaps an old flood control structure or something. I couldn't see anything on satellite, but it does look like there's a dirt road into the location from the back of the large "bus parking lot" on Wesvalley...

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    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    No, I have not been there, but I am going to L.P. this weekend, maybe I'll have time to go over and take a look. According to the map, there is a hiking trail nearby.
    Tom Rankin
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    Very strange stream this one, also because it must be under a tidal influence!

    From the split, check upstream about 700 metres - crosses a closed 1800' contour, meaning it's flowing uphill on the bump's north flanks!

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    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
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    The thing these sites have in common is the water courses were formed relatively recently since departure of glaciers perhaps within say last 12-15,000 years. Route of water may take couple 1000 more years to settle on final route. Or those pesky glaciers may decide to come back and obliterate everything and start all over again. Interesting feature about Mirror Lake appears to be kettle lake has no outlet.

    Speaking of glaciers I was just listening last night to some geologists on You Tube discoursing on catastrophic floods happened when glaciers receded in Pacific Northwest sudden releases of glacial Lakes Columbia and Missoula responsible for many of the unusual and monumental terrain features you see there such as Grand Cooley and Moses Cooley etc. I expect our mountains in Northeast also have similar stories to tell.
    Last edited by Jazzbo; 03-29-2019 at 06:33 AM.
    On #67 of NE67
    On #98 of NEHH
    On #45 of WNH48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzbo View Post

    Speaking of glaciers I was just listening last night to some geologists on You Tube discoursing on catastrophic floods happened when glaciers receded in Pacific Northwest sudden releases of glacial Lakes Columbia and Missoula responsible for many of the unusual and monumental terrain features you see there such as Grand Cooley and Moses Cooley etc. I expect our mountains in Northeast also have similar stories to tell.
    Lake Vermont/Champlain Sea and other smaller glacial lakes are probably the closest things we have. I think I remember reading somewhere about one draining from the Sandwich Range where Kelley Brook(?) is now.

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    Senior Member nartreb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HH1 View Post
    Very strange stream this one, also because it must be under a tidal influence!

    From the split, check upstream about 700 metres - crosses a closed 1800' contour, meaning it's flowing uphill on the bump's north flanks!
    That's not a bump, that's a swamp.

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