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Thread: Interesting Stream 'Crossing'

  1. #16
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    Lake Vermont/Champlain Sea and other smaller glacial lakes are probably the closest things we have. I think I remember reading somewhere about one draining from the Sandwich Range where Kelley Brook(?) is now.
    Re: the Kelly Trail (south of Paugus Pass) I think there is a small blurb in the AMC guide about it. Here's a quick article on it: https://www.conwaydailysun.com/outdo...c54231192.html

    It's a cool trail - definitely a great way to loop in the area.
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  2. #17
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    Regarding the 1800' bump and tide, my attempt at humour. Clearly that closed contour is an error. As mentioned this area is wetlands as indicated on the USGS topos.

    If this contour was depicting a true depression hash marks perpendicular to the contour would line its interior.

    And the USGS maps show that stream split too, so Lake Placid sports its very own 'delta', man-made or otherwise. Nice catch by Tom.

  3. #18
    Member Salty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzbo View Post
    Speaking of glaciers I was just listening last night to some geologists on You Tube discoursing on catastrophic floods happened when glaciers receded in Pacific Northwest sudden releases of glacial Lakes Columbia and Missoula responsible for many of the unusual and monumental terrain features you see there such as Grand Cooley and Moses Cooley etc. I expect our mountains in Northeast also have similar stories to tell.
    That got me thinking that I know nothing of the post-glacial situation around here, so curiosity got the better of me, and there were a number of glacial lakes:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Merrimack

    Subsequently found a nice article on Lake Hitchcock***, but had this description of when Lake Iroquois in NY blew it's dam:

    "That deluge drained into the Atlantic Ocean and was so large that researchers believe it may have affected a sudden cooling of the earth's climate." "Jeez, just when it was warming up again..."

    Hartford Courant article


    *** Interestingly, Lake Hitchcock was named after Edward Hitchcock, a geologist. He was the father of Charles H. Hitchcock of the White Mountains geological fame. Charles was also the man who organized sending up a party for a winter-over on the Rock Pile in 1870-1 for the purpose of weather observation (A. F. Clough and J. H. Huntington, likewise notable White Mtn. names, were part of that party).

    A bit more digging and I found the book describing this expedition online. Can't wait to read it now.

    Mount Washington in Winter
    Last edited by Salty; 03-30-2019 at 10:43 AM. Reason: I repeat myself when under stress, I repeat myself when under stress

  4. #19
    Member MikeM's Avatar
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    I think That is the beginnings of a process called "stream capture". Eventually silt or debris will begin to fill or block one of the stream channels and most of the water will be diverted to other stream. This will lead to more sediment and debris being deposited in the impeded channel and greater scouring in what now becomes the main channel due to increased water flow and speed. I imagine a thousand years or more from now one of these streams will win by capturing the other. I have never seen a stream crossing like that before on a topo, very cool.

  5. #20
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    I think That is the beginnings of a process called "stream capture". Eventually silt or debris will begin to fill or block one of the stream channels and most of the water will be diverted to other stream. This will lead to more sediment and debris being deposited in the impeded channel and greater scouring in what now becomes the main channel due to increased water flow and speed. I imagine a thousand years or more from now one of these streams will win by capturing the other. I have never seen a stream crossing like that before on a topo, very cool.
    This is a possiblity--some streams exhibit "headward erosion". In other words the head of a stream can "move" uphill by erosion. If this headward erosion hits another streambed, the second stream can be "captured".

    The 24K USGS topo shows additional detail: http://mapper.acme.com/?ll=44.28289,-73.99464&z=15&t=U

    I followed the unnamed sidebranch streambed on the aerial photographs (http://mapper.acme.com/?ll=44.28288,-73.99464&z=17&t=S or https://www.google.com/maps/@44.2825...1e3)--it's a little iffy in spots but the unnamed side branch does appear to intersect Outlet Brook.

    Doug

  6. #21
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    I drove around yesterday and there are in fact 2 healthy streams that flow down under Mill Pond Road. Of course there are a lot of healthy stream up there right now. I could not find any access to the split from the road, but I'm told I might be able to access it from here.
    Tom Rankin
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  7. #22
    Senior Member nartreb's Avatar
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    I happened to be in Lake Placid with some spare time, so I confirmed today that there is a well-maintained, well-marked ski/snowmobile trail from the big dirt lot on Wesvalley Rd, that leads directly to the split. The trail crosses the east branch on a little bridge, but the land in the "gore" is posted and the trail immediately fades. I could see more blazes but decided not to pursue the blazed trail. I followed the east side of the east branch along mostly faint trails, (I think I was on an older version of the snowmobile trail for part of the way, then got onto some much more recently-maintained stuff) eventually reaching the back of some properties along Wesvalley road near the NAPA store.

    The east branch is a clearly smaller branch, but there was no sign of a dam or other human intervention at the branching point. The stream didn't feel like a mill race - it had meanders and sandy shallows, and I could not see any sign of artificial hardening of the banks. Or course it was still a bit flooded, so I couldn't be sure where the normal bank was.

    I may go back tomorrow and find the outlet of the east branch, and follow it up toward Wesvalley Rd to look for signs of a mill.
    Last edited by nartreb; 05-04-2019 at 07:58 PM. Reason: a crucial "not" was missing due to rushed editing

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