Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Mosquito Netting For Tarp Camping

  1. #1
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,403

    Mosquito Netting For Tarp Camping

    With the warm weather approaching I'm revisiting my whole light weight, camp near treeline set up from a prior post and I'm thinking the easiest thing to do might be to just cave in and use a tarp for all the irregular terrain encountered in that zone . Curious if there is a definitive book or website devoted to the subject, i.e. shape and size of tarp to use, different ways of pitching, what to do in rain or high winds, etc, etc. Seems to be a huge volume of stuff out there on the subject but a lot of what I watched felt "amateurish" and uninformed. Curious if there was a defacto expert on the subject, i.e. like Andrew Skurka is for long distance hiking, etc.

    Of particular concern is bugs. What is the least intrusive way of adding netting to a tarp set up? Is just covering the open areas sufficient or should it be an enclosure with a floor? I see there are a lot of variations out there. Trying to anticipate problems that might not be obvious to me like attaching to the tarp and other considerations, especially if different tarp set ups are done. I am definitely not going to use a simple bug net over my head. I can't stand that feeling of enclosure. I definitely want a protected enclosed space under the tarp. I found a pretty decent one on Amazon for $49 that is basically an A-Frame with a floor, a side door and a front door and it was fairly light. Prices and designs are all over the place on these types of nets.

    If anyone has any suggestions or can point me in the direction of a detailed book and/or website it would be appreciated.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  2. #2
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New hampshire
    Posts
    2,548
    I once went on a 7 day trip and we used hammocks that had netting that enclosed the hammock, very effective. I know your looking for tarp info, just thought Id throw out an alternative that I have field tested with high regard.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    I once went on a 7 day trip and we used hammocks that had netting that enclosed the hammock, very effective. I know your looking for tarp info, just thought Id throw out an alternative that I have field tested with high regard.
    Thanks. I attempted hammock camping a few seasons ago and just couldn't get used to it. For near treeline camping it was also much harder to find a site than I thought with enough "site lines" between unobstructed trees to get a tarp over it (which is still an issue I'm trying to figure out - I really wanted to find a free standing design that was narrow to stuff in between trees. The shelter is not the problem. It is the fly or cover over it that is awkward. I do have a net though that I suppose I could try messing around with to see if it might work. It's designed to hang from the ridgeline on the hammock so maybe it would work nicely as a large bivy sack type set up actually now that I'm thinking about it. Have to give that a try in the yard. Probably wasn't what you intended but that gives me a good idea!
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  4. #4
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    'Springtime' on the Carters (Somerville, MA)
    Posts
    1,873
    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    Thanks. I attempted hammock camping a few seasons ago and just couldn't get used to it. For near treeline camping it was also much harder to find a site than I thought with enough "site lines" between unobstructed trees to get a tarp over it (which is still an issue I'm trying to figure out - I really wanted to find a free standing design that was narrow to stuff in between trees. The shelter is not the problem. It is the fly or cover over it that is awkward. I do have a net though that I suppose I could try messing around with to see if it might work. It's designed to hang from the ridgeline on the hammock so maybe it would work nicely as a large bivy sack type set up actually now that I'm thinking about it. Have to give that a try in the yard. Probably wasn't what you intended but that gives me a good idea!
    Bugs at night aren't usually a problem, so if you're an earlier rise you can probably get away with just using a head net. I do have a pyramid net that I only tend to carry once or twice a year, and primarily for hanging around camp before actually going to bed. I usually just prop it up with a pole or on a branch and it just drapes over my head area at night (and can run perpendicular to cover another person's head if needed). The rest of the body is pretty well protected by the sleeping bag.

    As for tarp, unless there's a chance of it raining I usually just sleep on my ground cloth. I bring some guy lines and use my poles to rig up the tent along with some steaks if it's going to rain or be breezy enough that we need a break. Ground cloth is polycryo (https://www.gossamergear.com/product...-ground-cloths) which is super light and cheap, and hasn't torn yet. For a tarp, I splurged and got an 8'x10' silnylon tarp for $75 (big enough for two people). if it rains you can always pop up an umbrella at one end to cover your head or feet.
    | 63.0% W48: 19/48
    Trail Adopter of the Guinea Pond Trail (Pemi District)

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    5,682
    I used to see a bug bivy when I was sectioning the AT. It was coated nylon bottom that ran up the sides about 2" or so with netting on top and a hoop to keep the netting away from the face. They could be used under tarps and kept any puddles from rain from getting at the sleeping bag and also worked well in shelters in buggy weather.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    I used to see a bug bivy when I was sectioning the AT. It was coated nylon bottom that ran up the sides about 2" or so with netting on top and a hoop to keep the netting away from the face. They could be used under tarps and kept any puddles from rain from getting at the sleeping bag and also worked well in shelters in buggy weather.
    Yes there are quite a few models out there in all shapes and sizes. I was surprised by the weight of many of these though. Some were comparable to a 1 person tent, which at that point I'd just take my tent. I'm primarily trying to set up an efficient design for near treeline camping but also trying to reduce weight. That $12 Kelty 1 person tent I bought last year on clearance does a lot of what I want but I don't like the fly. It isn't all that light but for $12 it's hard to argue with.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Ipswich, MA
    Posts
    310
    http://borahgear.com/bugbivy.html

    Also, The Ray Way is a classic

  8. #8
    Senior Member jniehof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Dover,NH
    Posts
    1,043
    Your best reference is probably Ray Jardine. He renames the book with every edition and I believe the current is called Trail Life.

    In the past I've used the Mombasa Defender which is a simple single-hang drape net, attaching it to a point on the tarp using Grip Clips. The tick situation has gotten so bad I'm probably going to move into a full bug bivy. The advantage is that you can combine your groundsheet and bug protection, assuming you're okay with occasionally patching/restitching holes in the base of the bivy. This end of the ultralight world does get pretty heavily into DIY and for a long time the Meteor Bivy was the preferred pattern; I've been meaning to make one myself for a long time.

  9. #9
    Junior Member briarpatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Colchester, VT
    Posts
    25
    Are you thinking of a setup similar to the Nemo bugouts which were tarps with attached netting on the sides? I believe that had three sizes. I believe that 12x12 and 9x9 were more vehicle camping but their 7x7 was for remote camping. Not sure if they are still made.

  10. #10
    Senior Member cushetunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    451
    I’m not an obsessive ounce counter, but it seems to me that once you’ve got a tarp and a bug net, the weight is getting pretty comparable to a modern ultralight solo tent. Given that a tent can be set up quickly without much fussing compared to a tarp, which often requires some site-specific thinking, it seems like a tent may be the way to go. Or a hammock setup, which I have no experience with.

    The Nemo Bug out is great for what it is, but the 9x9 sure isn’t ultralight.

  11. #11
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by briarpatch View Post
    Are you thinking of a setup similar to the Nemo bugouts which were tarps with attached netting on the sides? I believe that had three sizes. I believe that 12x12 and 9x9 were more vehicle camping but their 7x7 was for remote camping. Not sure if they are still made.
    Concept is similar but these are really heavy. My 2 person car camping tent is lighter. Fairly expensive too. REI had them.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  12. #12
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by jniehof View Post
    Your best reference is probably Ray Jardine. He renames the book with every edition and I believe the current is called Trail Life.

    In the past I've used the Mombasa Defender which is a simple single-hang drape net, attaching it to a point on the tarp using Grip Clips. The tick situation has gotten so bad I'm probably going to move into a full bug bivy. The advantage is that you can combine your groundsheet and bug protection, assuming you're okay with occasionally patching/restitching holes in the base of the bivy. This end of the ultralight world does get pretty heavily into DIY and for a long time the Meteor Bivy was the preferred pattern; I've been meaning to make one myself for a long time.
    Thanks. That name did come up in some of my initial research but I was not familiar with him. I definitely want a net enclosure with a floor for full protection from bugs of all types. I'm currently thinking about this one: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07DK9F63T...v_ov_lig_dp_it It's 21 oz - not as light as I would have liked - but with a floor and zippered doors that would allow for some flexibility in the tarp set up and easy access. My tarp weighs 15 oz so with stakes, line, etc I'd be somewhere around 3 lbs, which doesn't save much weight.

    In a perfect world I'd find a 1 person ultralight tent with a fly that does not create vestibules but is tight around the tent and just zipped back to expose the mesh. The Kelty model I use now is narrow enough to stuff in pretty tight spaces but staking out the fly doesn't work well with trees or rocks in the way. I might even use the tent body with a tarp. The Kelty tent was dirt cheap but isn't that light. I can shave almost a pound off the set up substituting my tarp for the fly of that tent. But that still brings me back to trying to fit the tarp in the tight spot with trees in the way, etc. and the fact that a freestanding tent, while convenient, doesn't work well on an irregular ground surface like I'll find near treeline. I'm sure what I am trying to do doesn't exist or I would have found it by now.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  13. #13
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New hampshire
    Posts
    2,548
    Your post got me thinking, as I also like to tinker with gear. Have you looked at the REI Bug Out Bivi? All you would have to do, is set up your tarp over it. The only question with this option would be your size. I seem to remember you saying, your not a small guy. One of the reviews was by a bigger man and he said it was an awesome piece of gear, just to small for him. It weighs 14 oz. and cost 70 bucks.

  14. #14
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    Your post got me thinking, as I also like to tinker with gear. Have you looked at the REI Bug Out Bivi? All you would have to do, is set up your tarp over it. The only question with this option would be your size. I seem to remember you saying, your not a small guy. One of the reviews was by a bigger man and he said it was an awesome piece of gear, just to small for him. It weighs 14 oz. and cost 70 bucks.
    I have looked at set ups like this. And your recall is correct. I'm 6' 3" and about 235. I want something more tent like so I can sit up in it, change clothes, etc. This would definitely fit the bill but is also very restrictive. I'm somewhat claustrophobic too so this type of set up I find uncomfortable. I have an OR Gore Tex bivy for Winter emergency shelter and while I can use it it definitely freaks me out a little bit if I think about it.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  15. #15
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New hampshire
    Posts
    2,548
    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    I have looked at set ups like this. And your recall is correct. I'm 6' 3" and about 235. I want something more tent like so I can sit up in it, change clothes, etc. This would definitely fit the bill but is also very restrictive. I'm somewhat claustrophobic too so this type of set up I find uncomfortable. I have an OR Gore Tex bivy for Winter emergency shelter and while I can use it it definitely freaks me out a little bit if I think about it.
    I hear you on being claustrophobic, I as well, never cared for the bivi bags for that reason. When I camped in the backcountry in the winter by myself. I used the Sierra Designs Tiros 1. A bit heavy for one person, but man that thing could hold off Armageddon. Coupled with my -35 bag, I felt very safe in any conditions.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •