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Thread: How repair hole in elastic side pocket

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    How repair hole in elastic side pocket

    The elastic side pockets on my pack have these gaping holes. They are in the middle of the fabric, not at the edge. I suspect they got started when my pack scraped against trees or other objects. Almost to the point where contents will drop through to the ground.

    Looking for good ideas on how to patch. Suspect elastic is more difficult to create a long-lasting fix than non-stretch material. I have no experience working with elastic.
    散步 Sanbu

  2. #2
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanbu View Post
    The elastic side pockets on my pack have these gaping holes. They are in the middle of the fabric, not at the edge. I suspect they got started when my pack scraped against trees or other objects. Almost to the point where contents will drop through to the ground.

    Looking for good ideas on how to patch. Suspect elastic is more difficult to create a long-lasting fix than non-stretch material. I have no experience working with elastic.
    You could try this Gear Aid Tenacious Tape iron-on patch for stretch fabric. Or, if you have a sewing machine, take a swatch of stretch fabric and use an stretch stick, such as an overedge stitch, to sew it on. Or send the pack to Rainey Pass Repair.

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    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEO View Post
    You could try this Gear Aid Tenacious Tape iron-on patch for stretch fabric. Or, if you have a sewing machine, take a swatch of stretch fabric and use an stretch stick, such as an overedge stitch, to sew it on. Or send the pack to Rainey Pass Repair.
    I don’t need a repair right now but this is great info for future reference. Thanks!
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

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    Senior Member bignslow's Avatar
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    I've had mice eat through elastic hip pockets of a backpack when they were stored in my garage, and I've also had abrasion wear through side pockets of another pack. My solution was to simply sew multiple stitches across the elastic portion of the pocket where the hole was located. This has the unfortunately side effect of reducing the overall volume of the pocket, but it works just fine.

    This was done with plain-old needle and thread and no fancy stitching (other than making sure to pull tight between stitches)
    Warning: BigNSlow may not actually be all that slow

  5. #5
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bignslow View Post
    I've had mice eat through elastic hip pockets of a backpack when they were stored in my garage, and I've also had abrasion wear through side pockets of another pack. My solution was to simply sew multiple stitches across the elastic portion of the pocket where the hole was located. This has the unfortunately side effect of reducing the overall volume of the pocket, but it works just fine.

    This was done with plain-old needle and thread and no fancy stitching (other than making sure to pull tight between stitches)
    Many of my repairs are done with just a needle, thread, and simple hand stitching, too. I'm still a hack when it comes to using my sewing machine.

    Another idea: put your hard-earned hiking patches to use as patches. Most of my patches live in file cabinet, but I did use my 111er patch to patch a hole in the lid of my pack after I left GORP in it over the winter and some mice discovered the stash.

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    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    At a loss as to how to patch something and in too much of a hurry or considered the product was not worth much effort, I used duct tape. After all, it holds Alaska together. I found it to last quite a while ... longer than I expected to keep it ... decided to reinforce the effort with clear duct tape on the outside. Be sure to clean the surfaces first and cut the tape to shape so that its easier to fit into place ... and I said I wasn't making a project of it ... overlapping layers help ... calls for a tailgate celebration.

  7. #7
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    At a loss as to how to patch something and in too much of a hurry or considered the product was not worth much effort, I used duct tape. After all, it holds Alaska together. I found it to last quite a while ... longer than I expected to keep it ... decided to reinforce the effort with clear duct tape on the outside. Be sure to clean the surfaces first and cut the tape to shape so that its easier to fit into place ... and I said I wasn't making a project of it ... overlapping layers help ... calls for a tailgate celebration.
    Even better use "Gorilla Tape"!
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

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    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    I repair my gear and clothes with a needle and thread. I have an assortment of heavy duty needles and I use upholstery thread. This thread is far superior to standard thread. You can find it at any store that sells cloth and such.

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    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    I repair my gear and clothes with a needle and thread. I have an assortment of heavy duty needles and I use upholstery thread. This thread is far superior to standard thread. You can find it at any store that sells cloth and such.
    If you hike and Back Pack you gotta have one of these. http://www.speedystitcher.com/#the-basics
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  10. #10
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    If you hike and Back Pack you gotta have one of these. http://www.speedystitcher.com/#the-basics
    That's pretty cool.

  11. #11
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    If you hike and Back Pack you gotta have one of these. http://www.speedystitcher.com/#the-basics
    That is pretty cool, but I have been sewing for years and could get the job a lot faster then that tool can.

  12. #12
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    That is pretty cool, but I have been sewing for years and could get the job a lot faster then that tool can.
    I bet you can. Especially at 18000 feet in a 20 below zero snow storm. I too have been sewing for years and even have a heavy duty machine which resides here at almost sea level in my warm cozy home. I guess I should have probably clarified that the “Speedy Stitcher” shines best as a field repair unit. My first experience with this unit was back in the late 70’s on a Winter Crawford/Franconia traverse. We made it into Z-Land and my partner’s shoulder strap on his pack was detaching from his pack. Fortunately the Care Taker had a “Speedy Stitcher” in his bag of tricks and lent it to us. Saved our trip. Speed and delicate is one thing but survival is another. I have done countless repairs with the speedy stitcher most of which have been on long term expeditions where sitting in a lazy boy with the heat on was not an option.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  13. #13
    Senior Member nartreb's Avatar
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    Those corner pockets get repeatedly abraded when you negotiate steep rocks on your butt. Duct tape works great, and it prevents further damage. I initially tried it as a field repair, found it lasted for years. Tape both inside and outside the pocket, so the tape sticks to itself. A bit of creativity and you can shape the pocket into an exact fit for your water bottle or whatever you keep there.

  14. #14
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    I carry a small spool of 30-lb braided fishing line along with Gerber Dime on my hikes in case I had to make backpack repairs while on trail.

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