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Thread: Hiker rescue on Mt Washington (was Scary.)

  1. #16
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  2. #17
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    The four thousand Footer Committee has spoken also:http://www.amc4000footer.org/
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  3. #18
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Hiking down the Cog in winter has always been on the list of winter escape routes for winter presi traverse groups. its a terrain feature that can be located and followed in very nasty conditions. The Jewell and Ammo are both far harder to locate in marginal conditions unless wanded. I and expect many others would not want to have to try the find the opening into the trees from the broad featureless terrain above treeline for Jewell. Obviously the cog is far more exposed to wind but its tends to get scoured by those same winds so it remains prominent.
    As one of the bad weather escapes, that makes sense if doing a Presi-Traverse,. If escaping weather, trespassing is not your first thought. While wide and easy to follow, it's not really graded for walking, in winter you hope the snow fills in some of the bumps. I'm not thinking it's a preferred route up or down Washington on a good day.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  4. #19
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dailey7779 View Post
    You pay inside or feed the iron ranger for hiking / skiing access.

    I know Ashley well as I hike and ski with her regularly. She had hiked and skied the cog before. She is tremendously thankful for everyone who was involved in rescuing her.

    -Chris
    Thanks, Chris. I hope she makes a full and speedy recovery.
    | 63.8% W48: 19/48
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  5. #20
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    And the WMNF Position

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  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P. View Post
    As one of the bad weather escapes, that makes sense if doing a Presi-Traverse,. If escaping weather, trespassing is not your first thought. While wide and easy to follow, it's not really graded for walking, in winter you hope the snow fills in some of the bumps. I'm not thinking it's a preferred route up or down Washington on a good day.
    I have newer hiked it but have run into many who have in the winter. In the winter if the conditions are right, its the most direct route to the summit and shortest of the three options that start at the base station. Looking at the profiles of the Cog, Ammo and Jewell, the Cog is the steadiest profile which would be expected for a railroad track. The rough road built for the powerline construction that folks usually walk on was "improved" two years ago by the cog up to treeline which caused them some issues with the county although it was ultimately resolved. Over the years I have never heard of any aggressive attempts to prevent hikers from using their strip of privately owned land for climbing to top beyond some signage at the bottom. They claim to operate under special federal railroad regulations which gives them special rights to their right of way so perhaps they do not need to post no trespassing signage like other properties in NH. The claim of special rights was a source of conflict with respect to the summit operations but I have never heard of any attempt to exclude hikers from the right of way during times when the cog is not in operation. The electrical utility clearing is definitely on Cog land and is used by many as more direct route to the summit after it crosses the west side trail. This was a non issue prior to plowing the base station road as the hiker traffic was far lower.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 03-25-2020 at 05:46 PM.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    The four thousand Footer Committee has spoken also:http://www.amc4000footer.org/
    Part of the reason the GF and I walked the Eastern Trail Saturday from Biddo to Scarborough marshes. About as flat as can be. 16 miles was still a long day and we are pretty sure that it was harder because we had no relief from using different muscles walking up and down hills and around roots and rocks. Still better than sitting on the couch.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom_Murphy View Post
    You are exaggerating people's positions. Support does not need to be unconditional support.

    I support the Cog and Auto Road Operations and appreciate both Companies' assistance with rescues and stranded hikers.

    I support the Cog parking fees for hikers using their lot.

    I do not support either Company building a hotel above the tree line.
    Yes, this

    need more characters

  9. #24
    Senior Member Salty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    Another great help/rescue by the Cog. How many now since 1869? And still no one comes out and thanks them from the many in the hiking communty. Always scorn or other odd comments.
    I don't come onto Views to thank the S&R groups, NHFG (which always seems to involve CO Lucas getting out of bed, at least on TV :-) ), USFS, nor the Cog or any others that helped in a rescue every time one happens, if at all. That doesn't mean I'm not grateful to these organizations for being there and going the extra mile to help, and I am deeply grateful.

    I don't also like to speak for others, but I think my opinion is widely shared.

    And not speaking for anyone but myself, I am not grateful for cries of victim from every corner of life.

  10. #25
    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
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    In keeping with practicing caution in hiking excursions I opted to hike my local favorite Plymouth Mountain which is generally low risk outing, yet provides interesting terrain. As trail involves north facing slope I encountered generous snow cover. I knew I'd need traction so I carried micro-spikes and Hillsounds. The trail at lower elevations was a well packed trail turned super icy by recent rains and subsequent freezing temps. The light traction was OK used with caution, but crampons would have been the best traction. Unfortunately icy packed trails appears to be the norm what with rains and freezing temps.

    Hikers coming up from southern NE (where daffodils are in bloom) are probably underestimating ice hazards thinking all they need is light traction. IMO People have gotten out of the habit of carrying and using crampons thanks to proliferation of micro-spikes and Hillsounds. This is particularly true on higher summits, but can even be the case on more moderate peaks. Insufficient traction is putting even experienced hikers and SAR at risk as shown by this recent accident on cog RR.
    Last edited by Jazzbo; 03-25-2020 at 09:17 PM.
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  11. #26
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    I have newer hiked it but have run into many who have in the winter. In the winter if the conditions are right, its the most direct route to the summit and shortest of the three options that start at the base station. Looking at the profiles of the Cog, Ammo and Jewell, the Cog is the steadiest profile which would be expected for a railroad track. The rough road built for the powerline construction that folks usually walk on was "improved" two years ago by the cog up to treeline which caused them some issues with the county although it was ultimately resolved. Over the years I have never heard of any aggressive attempts to prevent hikers from using their strip of privately owned land for climbing to top beyond some signage at the bottom. They claim to operate under special federal railroad regulations which gives them special rights to their right of way so perhaps they do not need to post no trespassing signage like other properties in NH. The claim of special rights was a source of conflict with respect to the summit operations but I have never heard of any attempt to exclude hikers from the right of way during times when the cog is not in operation. The electrical utility clearing is definitely on Cog land and is used by many as more direct route to the summit after it crosses the west side trail. This was a non issue prior to plowing the base station road as the hiker traffic was far lower.
    Just because it's constant wouldn't make it for walking. I was thinking graded, as what a road grader does or how Edmands made his trails as opposed to the degree of incline. The Cog does incorporate trestles when needed. The constant incline reminds me more of a ski slope, (hence the ski train attempts), not a green trail like pole-cat that takes a fairly wide circuitous route down Wildcat D but more like the run under the ski-lifts. My thoughts on hiking up ski slopes is that they are designed for swift travel downhill while wearing boards on your feet designed to limit friction with an slick surface.

    Due to the conditions of Caribou Valley Road one autumn, it was how I had to approach Sugarloaf. I've walked up them in PA and at Mammoth also. Mammoth was just to the top of the bunny slope to get used to walking uphill above 8000 feet & to take pictures while my avatar was still sleeping I hope I never have to walk up one again.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  12. #27
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Me and my dog hiked on Wednesday. We chose Waterville Valley, barely an hour from my house. I did not stop anywhere going up, or on the way home. When encountering people on the trail, I stepped well off the trail and asked them to pass. Had to stop two people from trying to pet my dog. Ran into Ed H. he's still kicking around to no surprise.

  13. #28
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    Me and my dog hiked on Wednesday. We chose Waterville Valley, barely an hour from my house. I did not stop anywhere going up, or on the way home. When encountering people on the trail, I stepped well off the trail and asked them to pass. Had to stop two people from trying to pet my dog. Ran into Ed H. he's still kicking around to no surprise.
    Just a little curious here - how does your dog contribute to choosing?
    Last edited by iAmKrzys; 03-26-2020 at 02:37 PM.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    Part of the reason the GF and I walked the Eastern Trail Saturday from Biddo to Scarborough marshes. About as flat as can be. 16 miles was still a long day and we are pretty sure that it was harder because we had no relief from using different muscles walking up and down hills and around roots and rocks. Still better than sitting on the couch.
    I love that trail. We bicycle on it every August during our annual visit to southern Maine. Here's to happier times

  15. #30
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    Just a little curious here - how does your dog contribute to choosing?
    I suspect he does not want infected people touching his dog, thereby making him more susceptible to getting the virus as well.
    Tom Rankin
    Volunteer Balsam Lake Mountain
    Past President Catskill 3500 Club
    CEO

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