Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: The Moose are out and active

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    6,230

    The Moose are out and active

    I was making a run up through Pinkham Notch around 6 PM last evening and had a yearling moose come trotting out of the woods and across the road with no regard for social distancing. Luckily I didn't get to see how a 5 1/2 ton Unimog would fare with a 500 pound moose. The winter tick most likely had a high mortality on young moose (I have not seen any numbers yet). Given the lower traffic count, it will be interesting to see if motor vehicle/moose mortality increases or decreases. I havent seen tracks on the end of my road adjacent to RT2 so it may be early.

    BTW, NH is doing fairly heavy speed enforcement in the region.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Lewiston, and Biddeford Maine
    Posts
    671
    you have an Unimog? Why have I never seen that driving around? Its not like those don't stick out.

  3. #3
    Senior Member TomK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Home: Northwest CT / Avatar: Madison 1985
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Given the lower traffic count, it will be interesting to see if motor vehicle/moose mortality increases or decreases.
    ...

    BTW, NH is doing fairly heavy speed enforcement in the region.
    Despite the speed enforcement, I wonder if there will be fewer collisions, but the ones that occur are more damaging.

    TomK
    Never loved your plains, your gentle valleys/Your drowsy country lanes and pleached alleys.
    I want my hills, the trail that scorns the hollow/Up, up the ragged shale where few will follow.

    High on my hills of dream, dear hills that know me/And then how fair will seem the lands below me
    How pure at vesper time, the far bells chiming/God, give me strength to climb, and hills for climbing. "Hills" - Arthur Guiterman

  4. #4
    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Waltham, MA Jazzbo & Marty meet Bigfoot on Kennebago Divide
    Posts
    1,142

    Wink

    HA!!! Good opportunity to test out photo insertion features of new software. Which one were you driving? This one?



    Or this one?



    You should seek help for you have too many vehicles.
    On #67 of NE67
    On #99 of NEHH
    On #46 of WNH48

    An atom walked up to me and said "i think I've lost an electron"
    I said "are you sure?"
    It reply "I'm positive."

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Lewiston, and Biddeford Maine
    Posts
    671
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzbo View Post
    HA!!! Good opportunity to test out photo insertion features of new software. Which one were you driving? This one?



    Or this one?



    You should seek help for you have too many vehicles.
    I think the top one, in the Guard, we called a CEE. Pretty amazing vehicle. It had an air compressor with pneumatic tools, including a chainsaw. That thing wouldn't even slow down cutting up timbers. We had a few AT's where that was the most requested piece of equipment for engineering missions.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    6,230
    Thanks for the photos Jazzbo. The Ambulance is now a cargo body (flat bed with swing up sides). Folks turn the ambulances into overland adventure vehicles. It had a 40 thousand BTU furnace in the back with room for four stretchers and jump seats for two. The cargo body is a little more practical than the ambulance (which came equipped with the complete interior including stretcher racks sitting in the weeds to the right). Its rated for about 40" of water depth for fording. For some reason I expect the 4 K committee might frown on my using this as my standard vehicle for judging where a hike should start. There is an importer in Effingham NH so there are several of them that I know about in NH. The cargo body is the last series that didnt have electronics in it which makes it more practical to fix. Sadly its too wide to be allowed into Baxter. The Special Emplacement Excavator (SEE) is US army surplus, they ordered 2000 plus from Mercedes through their Freightliner division to fight a ground war in Europe against the USSR, by the time they got delivered and sent out to the troops the Soviet Union was gone. They mostly sat in storage for 25 years, this one had 430 hours on the engine and 400 miles on the odometer. The hours and miles are probably mostly from periodic operational testing.

    Sadly I ran out of VFTT stickers so I cant put one on them so someone recognizes it in parking lot.

  7. #7
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Posts
    2,605
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Thanks for the photos Jazzbo. The Ambulance is now a cargo body (flat bed with swing up sides). Folks turn the ambulances into overland adventure vehicles. It had a 40 thousand BTU furnace in the back with room for four stretchers and jump seats for two. The cargo body is a little more practical than the ambulance (which came equipped with the complete interior including stretcher racks sitting in the weeds to the right). Its rated for about 40" of water depth for fording. For some reason I expect the 4 K committee might frown on my using this as my standard vehicle for judging where a hike should start. There is an importer in Effingham NH so there are several of them that I know about in NH. The cargo body is the last series that didnt have electronics in it which makes it more practical to fix. Sadly its too wide to be allowed into Baxter. The Special Emplacement Excavator (SEE) is US army surplus, they ordered 2000 plus from Mercedes through their Freightliner division to fight a ground war in Europe against the USSR, by the time they got delivered and sent out to the troops the Soviet Union was gone. They mostly sat in storage for 25 years, this one had 430 hours on the engine and 400 miles on the odometer. The hours and miles are probably mostly from periodic operational testing.

    Sadly I ran out of VFTT stickers so I cant put one on them so someone recognizes it in parking lot.
    You must be enjoying the drop in the price of Fuel.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Lewiston, and Biddeford Maine
    Posts
    671
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Thanks for the photos Jazzbo. The Ambulance is now a cargo body (flat bed with swing up sides). Folks turn the ambulances into overland adventure vehicles. It had a 40 thousand BTU furnace in the back with room for four stretchers and jump seats for two. The cargo body is a little more practical than the ambulance (which came equipped with the complete interior including stretcher racks sitting in the weeds to the right). Its rated for about 40" of water depth for fording. For some reason I expect the 4 K committee might frown on my using this as my standard vehicle for judging where a hike should start. There is an importer in Effingham NH so there are several of them that I know about in NH. The cargo body is the last series that didnt have electronics in it which makes it more practical to fix. Sadly its too wide to be allowed into Baxter. The Special Emplacement Excavator (SEE) is US army surplus, they ordered 2000 plus from Mercedes through their Freightliner division to fight a ground war in Europe against the USSR, by the time they got delivered and sent out to the troops the Soviet Union was gone. They mostly sat in storage for 25 years, this one had 430 hours on the engine and 400 miles on the odometer. The hours and miles are probably mostly from periodic operational testing.

    Sadly I ran out of VFTT stickers so I cant put one on them so someone recognizes it in parking lot.
    Do you have the unit stenciled on the bumpers? I see the co-driver's name is on the windshield.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    6,230
    No bumpers on the SEE, the numbers on the loader arms are it. The 1300 had its ID removed but I traced it to a military hospital in Bavaria.

    The price of fuel is not much of an issue. They are road going tractors, not much horsepower but plenty of torque and the gearing is numerically high. The tires limit both of them to 62 MPH. The short wheelbase and loader bucket hanging off the front of the SEE means much over 35 MPH is not something I want to repeat. The 1300 runs out of gearing around 56 mph.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    MA & NH
    Posts
    263
    What do you use them for? Not that here needs to be any purpose. I saw one in front of the Starbucks in N. Conway last year as we were driving by.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    6,230
    83 Acres of steep wood lot in Randolph, possibly a snow plow for a driveway on same lot. The 1300 may become a camper in a few years. Unlike a similar capacity newer vehicle, these are designed to last a long time and be repairable. No computers. I paid less for the SEE than a small size Kubota with backhoe and loader and got a lot more capacity. Not obvious is its got a rock bucket on the backhoe with ripper claws and hardened steel tips that work real well in the rocky soil up north plus it has an auxiliary hydraulic system with hose reel to run hydraulic power tools, it came with a rock drill and jackhammer. The US paid around $110K for the SEEs in 1987.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    MA & NH
    Posts
    263
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    83 Acres of steep wood lot in Randolph, possibly a snow plow for a driveway on same lot. The 1300 may become a camper in a few years. Unlike a similar capacity newer vehicle, these are designed to last a long time and be repairable. No computers. I paid less for the SEE than a small size Kubota with backhoe and loader and got a lot more capacity. Not obvious is its got a rock bucket on the backhoe with ripper claws and hardened steel tips that work real well in the rocky soil up north plus it has an auxiliary hydraulic system with hose reel to run hydraulic power tools, it came with a rock drill and jackhammer. The US paid around $110K for the SEEs in 1987.
    Thx. I checked out the website for the dealer in Effingham. Very interesting. I wish I had a need!

  13. #13
    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Waltham, MA Jazzbo & Marty meet Bigfoot on Kennebago Divide
    Posts
    1,142
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    83 Acres of steep wood lot in Randolph, possibly a snow plow for a driveway on same lot. The 1300 may become a camper in a few years. Unlike a similar capacity newer vehicle, these are designed to last a long time and be repairable. No computers. Not obvious is its got a rock bucket on the backhoe with ripper claws and hardened steel tips that work real well in the rocky soil up north plus it has an auxiliary hydraulic system with hose reel to run hydraulic power tools, it came with a rock drill and jackhammer. The US paid around $110K for the SEEs in 1987.
    I was wondering whether or not to post shot of the backhoe end. You would cause quite a stir if you were to show up with the SEE at your local antique car meetup.

    On #67 of NE67
    On #99 of NEHH
    On #46 of WNH48

    An atom walked up to me and said "i think I've lost an electron"
    I said "are you sure?"
    It reply "I'm positive."

  14. #14
    Senior Member Barkingcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Верхоянский хребет
    Posts
    1,092
    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    you have an Unimog? Why have I never seen that driving around? Its not like those don't stick out.
    Years ago, we drove a 1972 Land Rover FC-101. It did stick out, not only because of the way it looked but also because, on the few times it had to be driven on the highway, I had to keep it in the slow lane at about 55 or 60 mph.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Lewiston, and Biddeford Maine
    Posts
    671
    Quote Originally Posted by NHClimber View Post
    What do you use them for? Not that here needs to be any purpose. I saw one in front of the Starbucks in N. Conway last year as we were driving by.
    The SEE's we used in the Army, you could build a timber trestle bridge with the tools it came with. Matter of fact, that;s what I used one for up in Beddington Maine during an Annual Training. Pretty damn capable piece of engineering equipment. They took the place of our JD410's during one of the TOE re-alignments we had during the 1st Gulf War. Transitioned from fighting a war in Europe, to the desert. Not much desert up here in New England.

    Unimogs are used as a base for Overlanding Expedition Vehicles. Some of them can get pretty spendy.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •