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Thread: The Virus, Tourism and Risk in the North Country

  1. #16
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P. View Post
    My son & I are used to spending a week in the Allagash with limited facilities. He eats a very limited menu, bagels, Chex Mix, Crackers and Cheese, dry cereal and instant breakfast. I'll eat everything, and have, so cold bagels, cliff & fig bars, Cheese, bananas are fine.
    You need to do the Allagash with my younger brother. Last June we dined along the river on Chicken Provençal; Deftig-würziger Wirsingeintopf mit Kasseler (German Hearty-tasty Savoy Stew—smoked pork chop, savoy cabbage, carrots, onion, herbs & spices); Penne Carbonara; and on the final morning, scrambled eggs with Gruyere, smoked salmon, and carmelized onion. Dinners included wine and beer pairings. All were cooked in his cast-iron Dutch oven. (Our lunches were PB&J on homemade sourdough, provided by the wife of a trip-mate.) There was a good reason why I assigned my brother as Chef de Cuisine. Our two other trip-mates, on the other hand, thought he was joking with his proposed menus and were blown away.


  2. #17
    Senior Member Mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    Just read an interesting stat out of NH: 80% of all of COVID deaths state wide have been in nursing home and care facilities.
    Up here, too. We've had 58 deaths in total in Nova Scotia, of which 52 were from one retirement facility. Tragic, but not indicative of significant community spread outside of those types of institutions.

  3. #18
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEO View Post
    You need to do the Allagash with my younger brother. Last June we dined along the river on Chicken Provençal; Deftig-würziger Wirsingeintopf mit Kasseler (German Hearty-tasty Savoy Stew—smoked pork chop, savoy cabbage, carrots, onion, herbs & spices); Penne Carbonara; and on the final morning, scrambled eggs with Gruyere, smoked salmon, and carmelized onion. Dinners included wine and beer pairings. All were cooked in his cast-iron Dutch oven. (Our lunches were PB&J on homemade sourdough, provided by the wife of a trip-mate.) There was a good reason why I assigned my brother as Chef de Cuisine. Our two other trip-mates, on the other hand, thought he was joking with his proposed menus and were blown away.
    The Scouts go and we try and keep breakfasts to Oatmeal, lunches we do tortillas and canned tuna or chicken and then Mountain House meals. We don't bring coolers & try and bring all our water. We filtered & boiled some last time as one of the jugs had a leak. I'd enjoy your meals, my son would opt to go hungry as probably some other finicky 14 year old scouts. We have nut allergies in the troop so no PB& J

    Your trips sound familiar to a hut to hut trip I took in the 90's. A friend & I went with Mountain House & we went from Franconia to Crawford Notch. When we got to Galehead, we shared the hut with a group that had booked most of the bunks for that weekend. They brought wagons up the Zealand Trail to the junction with the Twinway & they carried their gear up to the hut. They had coolers of real food and beverages. The night we were there we quickly finished our freeze dried pasta and they were still preparing their veal scaloppini. At 34, my friend & I did our best to look pathetic and we were rewarded with some of their extra food & wine. I always said I would go back that weekend but never have.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  4. #19
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P. View Post
    The Scouts go and we try and keep breakfasts to Oatmeal, lunches we do tortillas and canned tuna or chicken and then Mountain House meals. We don't bring coolers & try and bring all our water. We filtered & boiled some last time as one of the jugs had a leak. I'd enjoy your meals, my son would opt to go hungry as probably some other finicky 14 year old scouts. We have nut allergies in the troop so no PB& J.
    Mike, what's the logic behind bringing along all of your water? That's a lot of extra room and weight, not to mention extra gas on the drive up.

    We had oatmeal with Vermont Maple Syrup for most breakfasts.

  5. #20
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEO View Post
    Mike, what's the logic behind bringing along all of your water? That's a lot of extra room and weight, not to mention extra gas on the drive up.

    We had oatmeal with Vermont Maple Syrup for most breakfasts.
    The main logic is the troop owns several five gallon plastic jugs, we fill them at our outfitter in Allagash before we are driven to our put in spot just below Churchill Dam. We are in Canoes so weight isn't much of an issue, we need some to offset the 120 pound scout in the front of the boat with the maybe 260 pound adult in the back.

    River water has a bit of tannin and taste to it. Not harmful, however, when I have six scouts from different backgrounds and some leaders who think of car camping as being out in the great outdoors, if carrying water keeps them hydrated and not whining, I'm all for it. We did fine that while no one was suffering from dehydration, I'd don't believe they were on the low side of being hydrated. You start with 2.5 to 3 gallons per person plus the water in their water bottles for day one. By the time we get to the portage at Allagash Falls, we have half of what we started with.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  6. #21
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    Interesting article on health risks associated with various activities https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...=pocket-newtab

    Short version a lot of the outdoor activities we participate in are low risk, just plan on tailgating.

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