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Thread: 9 Circles of Hiker Hell

  1. #16
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    On the "who gets out of the way" question, common courtesy and awareness of one's surroundings are the only real rule that matters. On our narrow Adirondack trails, there are fairly long stretches where it's hard to find a decent place to step off the trail. Paying attention so you know in advance that there is a party wishing to pass (in any direction) helps a lot. Sadly there are lots of folks out there who don't notice anything until it's right in front of them.

  2. #17
    Senior Member dug's Avatar
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    Unless it's winter and the downhill has gone sledding....then the uphill better the the hell out of the way.

  3. #18
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Metsky View Post
    Yielding to those walking faster, sure. But the uphill/downhill thing is arbitrary and bogus, IMO. And I feed the Jays as well.
    No reference to unleashed dogs either, that's a clear oversight.
    Oh yeah, hikers with unleashed dogs proceed to the center of the circle.

    Here's a first for me: Last week a hiker on Belknap arrived at the summit with two unleashed dogs. As the bowsers were drawing a bead on our lunch items on the picnic table below the fire tower he asked if we wanted him to leash his dogs! We said yes, please do and that was the end of it. Dogs near him and under control.

    A very nice interaction but alas, rare.
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
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  4. #19
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Metsky View Post
    I'm a VFTT Moderator. I'm already in hell.
    Rolling on the floor, laughing, Dave. Well played sir!

  5. #20
    Senior Member jniehof's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Eagan View Post
    Quick search finds REI, American Alpine Institute, Modern Hiker, Lonely Planet, American Hiking Society, Colorado 14ers, Wiki "Trail Ethics," Zion National Park, etc., etc. all saying uphill hiker has right of way. I couldn't find any sources saying downhill hikers have right of way.
    Mountaineers also say uphill. Apparently the Boy Scout manual used to say downhill has RoW but has since changed to uphill. Not that that's stopped the occasional scoutmaster who wanted to chew me out.

  6. #21
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    Looks like something from a Leave No Trace training. Ever play the Ethics game?

  7. #22
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jniehof View Post
    Mountaineers also say uphill.
    Are you pertaining to Class 4 and 5 terrain? If so IMO that would literally and figuratively put the discussion in a different realm. If so I would totally agree. In more technical terrain the hazards and risk are heightened from above. Disrupted falling rock and ice from a climber above for example. Also even a falling climber from above presents a hazard to those below. With the above climber yielding to those below it is pertinent to everyone’s safety. Owl’s head slide and N. Tripyramid Slide would IMO would be areas of concern where falling debris present hazards from above. Another example would be Flume Slide and Huntington’s Ravine where the potential of a hiker from above slipping and taking out someone from below is a possibility. Within one’s own party these elements are somewhat easier to control. Individuals from other parties not so easily. Therefore it is important to be aware and hopefully maintain good position in the event of potential falling debris or individuals. Having gone to a presentation by The Author of Accidents in North American Mountaineering many years ago these points were hammered home. The Presenter emphasized how a very high percentage of all accidents in the Mountains were due to poor position.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    Are you pertaining to Class 4 and 5 terrain?
    I assumed he was referring to The Mountaineers from Seattle.
    Last edited by jfb; 06-07-2020 at 11:16 PM.

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