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Thread: 9 Circles of Hiker Hell

  1. #1
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    9 Circles of Hiker Hell

    Funny, and also true, from Outside magazine.

    Brian

    # # #

    9 Circles of Hiker Hell

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    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    I've seen this before, not sure where, but #1 is surely debatable (search the archives).

    Wild flowers, I think you can pick a small quantity, right? I know in NY you can pick berries, or ramps, etc. for personal consumption.

    And I guess I'm condemned, I feed the Gray Jays!
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    Moderator David Metsky's Avatar
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    Yielding to those walking faster, sure. But the uphill/downhill thing is arbitrary and bogus, IMO. And I feed the Jays as well.

    It's missing postholing, which should be close to the inner circle, except fortunately for those folks a lot of their punishment is here on earth. Postholing on ski trails is the worst. No reference to unleashed dogs either, that's a clear oversight.
    You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself, any direction you choose. -- Dr. Seuss

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    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Metsky View Post
    But the uphill/downhill thing is arbitrary and bogus, IMO.
    Honestly, I prefer to yield to people going downhill as it gives me a chance to catch a breath without having to admit that I really need it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Metsky View Post
    Yielding to those walking faster, sure. But the uphill/downhill thing is arbitrary and bogus, IMO.
    I'm not sure it is arbitrary, it's more difficult to regain momentum when heading uphill and the downhill hiker has a better view of the trail to locate an appropriate place to pull aside.

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    Senior Member jniehof's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Metsky View Post
    Yielding to those walking faster, sure. But the uphill/downhill thing is arbitrary and bogus, IMO.
    Driving on the right side of the road is also arbitrary...some things are arbitrary but you really need a societal agreement.

    Clicking the quote button on IamKrzys's post isn't getting the quote in here, so I'll just say: uphill having RoW means that, when uphill is gassed and wants to take a break, they get the chance to be the good guy and yield RoW. Everybody's happy, brief "no you, no you" and along we go.

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    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    I'm not sure it is arbitrary, it's more difficult to regain momentum when heading uphill and the downhill hiker has a better view of the trail to locate an appropriate place to pull aside.
    I find it a lot that it depends on the terrain and where it is good to stop. Sometimes whether your uphill or downhill your just in a better place to pull over than the other guy. I personally don’t get my panties up my crack about it. I have had bc Skiers on a two way trail and even within groomed XC centers say just the opposite of hikers and get all pissy about it at the same time. Again I find it is just the situation of your position. Be considerate to the next guy whether he is uphill or downhill.
    Last edited by skiguy; 06-03-2020 at 02:57 PM.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

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    Moderator David Metsky's Avatar
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    I prefer small groups yield to large groups, that way fewer people step off the trail. An arbitrary choice would be fine if there was a need, but I don't really see the need for a rule.
    You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself, any direction you choose. -- Dr. Seuss

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    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    Honestly, I prefer to yield to people going downhill as it gives me a chance to catch a breath without having to admit that I really need it!
    It also lets you look courteous at the same time !

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    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    Wild flowers, I think you can pick a small quantity, right?

    And I guess I'm condemned, I feed the Gray Jays!
    As Depeche Mode reminds us, everything counts in large amounts. If people thought it appropriate to pick trillium to put behind their ears for a selfie, every flower within sight of a trail would be gone before 9am. A simpler rule is to say, "if you find it in the woods, leave it there."

    As for feeding birds, here's what the NPS has to say:
    "Do not feed birds or any other wildlife in national parks. This is dangerous to you and the animal, and it’s against the law."
    https://www.nps.gov/subjects/watchingwildlife/gear.htm

    Dave & Tom, you both seem like smart, decent people. The Parks Service asks you not to feed birds, so please don't feed them. It's illegal, and it's bad for them. Plus, when you die, you don't want to go to hiker hell.

    Thanks!

  11. #11
    Moderator David Metsky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post
    Plus, when you die, you don't want to go to hiker hell.
    I'm a VFTT Moderator. I'm already in hell.
    You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself, any direction you choose. -- Dr. Seuss

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    Senior Member Steve-o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post
    As Depeche Mode reminds us, everything counts in large amounts. If people thought it appropriate to pick trillium to put behind their ears for a selfie, every flower within sight of a trail would be gone before 9am. A simpler rule is to say, "if you find it in the woods, leave it there."

    As for feeding birds, here's what the NPS has to say:
    "Do not feed birds or any other wildlife in national parks. This is dangerous to you and the animal, and it’s against the law."
    https://www.nps.gov/subjects/watchingwildlife/gear.htm

    Dave & Tom, you both seem like smart, decent people. The Parks Service asks you not to feed birds, so please don't feed them. It's illegal, and it's bad for them. Plus, when you die, you don't want to go to hiker hell.

    Thanks!
    It's also bad etiquette to crack open a can of tuna fish in a lean-to that your hiking party is staying in but, it doesn't matter because, you are tenting..
    Not illegal but, you get the point.

  13. #13
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    When it comes to passing other people on the trail I think the more delicate situation is when a slightly faster hiker catches up to someone else who is a bit slower ascending a narrow trail. Then it is really all about courtesy of the person (or a group of people) up front.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    I'm not sure it is arbitrary, it's more difficult to regain momentum when heading uphill and the downhill hiker has a better view of the trail to locate an appropriate place to pull aside.
    Quick search finds REI, American Alpine Institute, Modern Hiker, Lonely Planet, American Hiking Society, Colorado 14ers, Wiki "Trail Ethics," Zion National Park, etc., etc. all saying uphill hiker has right of way. I couldn't find any sources saying downhill hikers have right of way.

    Reasons include momentum and field of vision. Of course conditions and situations may vary.

  15. #15
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    On the "who gets out of the way" question, common courtesy and awareness of one's surroundings are the only real rule that matters. On our narrow Adirondack trails, there are fairly long stretches where it's hard to find a decent place to step off the trail. Paying attention so you know in advance that there is a party wishing to pass (in any direction) helps a lot. Sadly there are lots of folks out there who don't notice anything until it's right in front of them.

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