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Thread: Kayak Car Roof Rack Question

  1. #31
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Let me off one more factor - The after-market Thule on my Forester definitely makes it more difficult to remove the snow. My wife has a Highlander with factory cross bars and they are much lower profile, much more aerodynamic, and much less in the way of snow removal.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  2. #32
    Senior Member JustJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post

    That said... the towers mounted to the Subaru factory rack are IMO are more impervious to theft.



    There is a lock cylinder on the front of the Hull-A-Port to prevent it from being removed from the rack as well.

    Tim
    I have those on my Rouge. With a box cutter, they'll be off and gone in 5 minutes.
    Joe

  3. #33
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Are yours rubber or rubber-coated steel?

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  4. #34
    Senior Member JustJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    Are yours rubber or rubber-coated steel?

    Tim
    Good question. They're so flexible I assumed just heavy duty rubber. if there's a steel core it has to be pretty thin. But if so, I stand corrected. Tin snips. 😉 But seriously, I've had some sort of rack system for 25 years. Never once did I see evidence of tampering.
    Joe

  5. #35
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    They are supposedly rubber coated steel straps. I don't even have locks and have never had the racks stolen. However, when my bike is on the roof, I never leave it for more than a few minutes.

  6. #36
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    My reasoning (I am not a thief) is that there are more ways to pry the clip-on towers off with hands, sticks, random tools, then there are to cut those rubber-coated steel straps.

    https://www.thule.com/en-us/roof-rac...t-pack-_-17852

    Features
    Durable and easy-to-mount foot attaches to broad range of raised railings
    Built-in tool enables quick installation and removal
    Rubber-coated steel strap securely attaches foot to raised railings


    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    I have a Thule Hullavator and selected the footers based on the recommendation in Thule's website. When I changed cars the same footer was prescribed but for the vehicle I'm considering now, it would required a different footer.

    In both vehicles I attached the stern line to the tow hitch but needed to install a brush guard up front for the bow line. I like that the brush guard also clears brush away a bit and is likewise effective for pedestrians.

    I always bring the kayak to the Canadian Maritimes and Maine but rarely to NH. Likewise, I always bring it to Florida but rarely elsewhere outside New England though I'd consider it in a number of east coast destinations. Based upon these long distance journeys, I lose about 2 MPG when carrying the kayak. Its an easy calculation to determine whether you'd be better off financially leaving the boat at home and renting depending on the frequency of the use but I have found there are more "ideal" places to paddle than there are convenient outfitters and the freedom of coming and going as you please is priceless.

  8. #38
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfb View Post
    This car looks like it has factory crossbars: https://www.autotrader.com/cars-for-...ckType=listing
    That is what I got installed. If I remember right I didn't opt for it when I got my car but it was one of the options. They seem pretty sturdy and I haven't really noticed a change in noise level. I got them installed the same day I got new tires. Kind of wish I had split those events so I could evaluate the noise and mpg impact better.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  9. #39
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Can anyone comment on the straps/strapping process on these racks (the straps that hold the kayak)? Seems to be a lot of variation in type. Would be wiling to pay extra for a rack with an idiot proof system such as a clip that tightens like a backpack hip belt or similar set up versus threading through holes, looping, etc. Many of my hopeful kayak trips will involve lengthy rides so I really want a bullet proof system for securing. The https://www.amazon.com/Thule-Hull-Po.../dp/B00152TUUI seems to have such a nice set up. Any thoughts?
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  10. #40
    Senior Member JustJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    Can anyone comment on the straps/strapping process on these racks (the straps that hold the kayak)? Seems to be a lot of variation in type. Would be wiling to pay extra for a rack with an idiot proof system such as a clip that tightens like a backpack hip belt or similar set up versus threading through holes, looping, etc. Many of my hopeful kayak trips will involve lengthy rides so I really want a bullet proof system for securing. The https://www.amazon.com/Thule-Hull-Po.../dp/B00152TUUI seems to have such a nice set up. Any thoughts?
    There's probably a ton of videos on YouTube so I won't post a link to one. But the straps that tie down the kayak are ridiculously easy to do. They don't work how in your mind you'd think they do (at least not for me), but do it once and you can do it with ease. Very, very, simple. And other than something like the Thule Hullavator Pro, they pretty much all work the same way. No matter what brand or model.
    Joe

  11. #41
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustJoe View Post
    There's probably a ton of videos on YouTube so I won't post a link to one. But the straps that tie down the kayak are ridiculously easy to do. They don't work how in your mind you'd think they do (at least not for me), but do it once and you can do it with ease. Very, very, simple. And other than something like the Thule Hullavator Pro, they pretty much all work the same way. No matter what brand or model.
    Excellent. Thanks.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  12. #42
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    I use 3/8 in. nylon ropes to tie down my canoe, with the truckers hitch knots.

  13. #43
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    The clips provide tension and locking in one device, and allow for a variability in length of the strap - you may not get it over the exact same spot on the kayak every time. Once you get comfortable with where you strap it, you can always cut the longer straps to length so you don't have to tie up the excess. As Joe says above, it's really not that hard.

    Do be careful to put a half twist in any length of strap greater than a few inches to minimize the flapping/vibrations. Also, make sure they are not going to rub on each other or you will cause wear, leading to failure and likely to disaster!

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  14. #44
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    When it comes to moving either one of my sea kayaks, 18'6" and 19' respectively, its two straps on my rack, a rope to the front of vehicle tied in triangle (two points under bumper and the rope on the bow and a similar rope to the back. Long boats can really have quite a sail effect with cross winds and transfer the loads to the front and back make a big difference.

  15. #45
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    Do be careful to put a half twist in any length of strap greater than a few inches to minimize the flapping/vibrations. Also, make sure they are not going to rub on each other or you will cause wear, leading to failure and likely to disaster!

    Tim
    I'll be sure to check that. I assume long tag ends would also do a number on the cars paint job if they're slapping against it for hours on a long ride.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

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