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Thread: Multiple Hiker Rescue by other hikers on a Presi

  1. #1
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    Multiple Hiker Rescue by other hikers on a Presi

    https://www.concordmonitor.com/Peter...-Game-34810825

    Once you scroll through the ads there is a good level of detail. Hard for folks from away to realize that even though there are still small patches of snow in the mountains that the temps are getting high even up north.

    I usually have some NUUN and couple of Oral Rehydration packets in my daypack. I have handed out a few Nuun on long distance meetup hikes for folks who had symptons of electrolyte imbalance.

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    Member Rhody Seth's Avatar
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    Good on those young folks for being prepared and knowing what to do!

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    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    From the article linked to above:
    "Meanwhile, Emergency Medical Services were telling Leddy that it might take three or four hours to get a rescue squad up to them and they’d have to foot the bill, she said."

    When will someone is going to decline to be rescued upon hearing that they will be billed and sustain serious injury or death as a result?

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    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEO View Post
    From the article linked to above:
    "Meanwhile, Emergency Medical Services were telling Leddy that it might take three or four hours to get a rescue squad up to them and they’d have to foot the bill, she said."

    When will someone is going to decline to be rescued upon hearing that they will be billed and sustain serious injury or death as a result?
    I did a double take when I read that. That cannot be considered a standard practice, I hope. Get them down an then worry about charging them.

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    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEO View Post
    From the article linked to above:
    "Meanwhile, Emergency Medical Services were telling Leddy that it might take three or four hours to get a rescue squad up to them and they’d have to foot the bill, she said."

    When will someone is going to decline to be rescued upon hearing that they will be billed and sustain serious injury or death as a result?
    The fact that we put people in such a dilemma is ethically reprehensible.
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    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    911/EMS is not the ones who go out - F&G does (or the WMNF Snow Ranger's in the bowls in winter). It's on F&G to decide, based on preparedness and your Hike Safe or other $upport (fishing/hunting license or OHRV/Boating...) whether or not you should be billed. 911/EMS/Ambulance will typically bill you or your insurance even in town.

    I think

    Tim
    Last edited by bikehikeskifish; 06-18-2020 at 12:48 PM.
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    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    911/EMS is not the ones who go out - F&G does (or the WMNF Snow Ranger's in the bowls in winter). It's on F&G to decide, based on preparedness and your Hike Safe or other $upport (fishing/hunting license or OHRV/Boating...) whether or not you should be billed. 911/EMS/Ambulance will typically bill you or your insurance even in town.

    I think

    Tim
    That makes sense, EMS told them that, not F&G. Good catch.

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    In past rescues F&G has reportedly given out similar advice that their response time was not instantaneous and those calling for rescue may be responsible for rescue costs. I dont see why other posters object to what is essentially the truth.

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    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    In past rescues F&G has reportedly given out similar advice that their response time was not instantaneous and those calling for rescue may be responsible for rescue costs. I dont see why other posters object to what is essentially the truth.
    If they called in the first place what are the chances of them saying..."Ah forget it if your going to charge me. I'll just lie here and die". On the other hand it's argued that folks may not call in the first place knowing they may get charged. In either case negligence or recklessness is the underlying reason for being charged. How do we decrease those underlying behaviors? Better education possibly. Although IMO there will always be an underlying ignorance amongst the outdoor population. I have no hard facts. But if the last week is any indication it seems as if the unprepared is on the rise. Is this because of increased population and or an increased user base. Hopefully not an increase in baseline ignorance.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

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    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    But if the last week is any indication it seems as if the unprepared is on the rise. Is this because of increased population and or an increased user base. Hopefully not an increase in baseline ignorance.
    I would say there has definitely been a noticeable increase in non-hiker/first time hiker/less experienced hikers hitting the trail this year, presumably from the lack of recreation options due to COVID. Seeing a lot of people in jeans, no packs, groups which are clearly families, etc, etc. I did my first hike back in the Whites last week and foot traffic definitely seemed higher. (I went up the Skook to Lafayette; got a really early start and saw no people until I hit ridge, passed 14 people above treeline ALL attempting 1 day pemi-loops; On way down I passed over 20 people on Skook and many of them were definitely not "normal" hikers). Several told me they had been to 1-2 other trail heads but they were mobbed. So I presume this year will involve a lot of folks like this story just looking to get out there and having no idea what they are getting into.
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    Senior Member JustJoe's Avatar
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    It's the new normal. Get used to it.

    https://www.einnews.com/pr_news/5197...m-jewell-trail
    Joe

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    That's a great adventure for a 8-year-old kid. Good thing his father knew exactly who to call for assistance.
    Last edited by jfb; 06-18-2020 at 04:17 PM.

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    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustJoe View Post
    It's the new normal. Get used to it.

    https://www.einnews.com/pr_news/5197...m-jewell-trail
    So that makes it a "Hat Trick" for the last week. Get out the lawn chairs and the popcorn. It's going to be an entertaining Summer.
    Last edited by skiguy; 06-18-2020 at 04:54 PM.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

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    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustJoe View Post
    It's the new normal. Get used to it.

    https://www.einnews.com/pr_news/5197...m-jewell-trail
    I like the part where F&G try TWICE to talk this guy out of a rescue. "Come on buddy, you can do it! You got 50% battery life in that iPhone."

    Well if he's really from tony Westport CT he'll have no trouble paying for this little misadventure.

    On they good side they did summit!
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    I think somewhere in the past on VFTT, probably pre facebook was a report of a upset hiker who had decided to publicize their poor treatment by the AMC LOC hut crew. They had ended up near the hut late in the day and demanded that the hut crew let them stay the night. The hut was full so the hut crew offered to sell them a flashlight and point them down Ammo trail. The individuals were unhappy about this option and I think the AMC offered them to contact Fish and Game to declare an emergency. They grudgingly ended up walking down and then proceeded to try to bad mouth the AMC.

    Many if not all rescue related services have emergency protocols in place, before they are executed someone in authority has to make the decision to declare an emergency. F&G has that authority, they dont leave that decision to the person asking for rescue as every rescue response has the potential to cause other unplanned for impacts.To the person asking for rescue their priority is going to be the highest. Its sad to say but ATV accidents are now the number one user of F&G resources in Coos county (not so sure about Grafton). A typical F&G response to a hiker rescue potentially ties up more F&G staff than an ATV rescue. Once those staff are committed they are not readily available to respond to other rescues. So the decision to send a couple of rangers up to walk some under equipped hikers in warm conditions could mean not having the resources to respond to a more serious event. This happens all the time and at some point the state runs out of resources. Volunteer groups can help staff the rescues bu a F&G officer has to be in charge.

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