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Thread: Welch Dickey Fatal

  1. #1
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Welch Dickey Fatal

    Looks like possible hot-weather cardiac event on Welch-Dickey on 6/21/2020. RIP tramper.

    Temps on NH seacoast were in the 90s with significant humidity.

    Take it easy out there gang.
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
    .

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    My prayers for his family. With gyms closed and people inside for a couple of months or more and the heat wave, let's all be extra careful outside.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

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    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P. View Post
    My prayers for his family. With gyms closed and people inside for a couple of months or more and the heat wave, let's all be extra careful outside.
    This kind of news scares me being 71yrs old and over weight. A lot of my friends are dropping dead left and right. Scary. Oh well. Least my wife is with me if I croak on the trails. I only hike with her and no one else.

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    Senior Member Hillwalker's Avatar
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    This Tuesday, whilst camping for a couple of days at the Basin Pond Campground, I hiked from the campground up to Rim Junction where many years my late wife and I used to go to just sit and marvel at nature. The climb up is around 1300 feet gain in about two miles and a bit steep. At the junction sitting on the ledges looking out over Basin Pond and "my" Maine i experienced couple of dizzy spells which I have found normal at my age (80). My days are numbered as everyone's are, but my number gets lower every year. Twenty years ago or so when I used to hike a lot with MEB and Dr Wu (long time VFFT members) I used to joke about my carrying a filled out toe tag and black bivy sack for the big event. Still hiking after all these years.

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    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillwalker View Post
    This Tuesday, whilst camping for a couple of days at the Basin Pond Campground, I hiked from the campground up to Rim Junction where many years my late wife and I used to go to just sit and marvel at nature. The climb up is around 1300 feet gain in about two miles and a bit steep. At the junction sitting on the ledges looking out over Basin Pond and "my" Maine i experienced couple of dizzy spells which I have found normal at my age (80). My days are numbered as everyone's are, but my number gets lower every year. Twenty years ago or so when I used to hike a lot with MEB and Dr Wu (long time VFFT members) I used to joke about my carrying a filled out toe tag and black bivy sack for the big event. Still hiking after all these years.
    Good for you. I did Mt. Monadnock via Cliff Walk (longer then White Dot,etc) one very humid day. It had a heat index of 75 which was the worst in the whole state according to WMUR. I went anyway. Well I've done that hike a million times. I got pretty dizzy ( and I drank plenty of fluids and energy snacks) too towards the last mile or less. At the summit I felt funny still. Never usually get like that so I went to see a doc after and had a complete testing for heart. Ultra sound on a tread mill etc. I was clear and good to know.

    I don't tolerate the heat anyway I have that condition inherited were you sweat a bunch often while others don't.

  6. #6
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillwalker View Post
    This Tuesday, whilst camping for a couple of days at the Basin Pond Campground, I hiked from the campground up to Rim Junction where many years my late wife and I used to go to just sit and marvel at nature. The climb up is around 1300 feet gain in about two miles and a bit steep. At the junction sitting on the ledges looking out over Basin Pond and "my" Maine i experienced couple of dizzy spells which I have found normal at my age (80). My days are numbered as everyone's are, but my number gets lower every year. Twenty years ago or so when I used to hike a lot with MEB and Dr Wu (long time VFFT members) I used to joke about my carrying a filled out toe tag and black bivy sack for the big event. Still hiking after all these years.
    Great work, still playing outside! I'm only 64. My friends and I have joked for years about tying on the toe tag before putting on your shoes in the morning.

    For those familiar with triage, I always wanted to start a grim guide service, and call it "Black Tag Mountaineering." In alpinism, gallows humor is just fabulous. Thanks!

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    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    I don't tolerate the heat anyway I have that condition inherited were you sweat a bunch often while others don't.
    Me too Capt, in this heat, I'm usually sweating and I can still see the car. Don't need to wear too many layers in the other seasons either.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

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    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    Good for you. I did Mt. Monadnock via Cliff Walk (longer then White Dot,etc) one very humid day. It had a heat index of 75 which was the worst in the whole state according to WMUR. I went anyway. Well I've done that hike a million times. I got pretty dizzy ( and I drank plenty of fluids and energy snacks) too towards the last mile or less. At the summit I felt funny still. Never usually get like that so I went to see a doc after and had a complete testing for heart. Ultra sound on a tread mill etc. I was clear and good to know.

    I don't tolerate the heat anyway I have that condition inherited were you sweat a bunch often while others don't.
    What you both describe Iíve also experienced on two recent very hot hikes: early symptoms of heat exhaustion.

    Iíve started to keep track of my pulse rate and doing so serves as a throttle on my pace. For my age 145 is it. Over that I slow down or stop till it drops.

    On both recent hikes (Green Mountain loop and Turtle Back Mtn]. I remained a bit loopy until the post-hike dunk into a lake.

    Iíve since decided some days are just too hot to hike and the couch is a better/safer option!
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
    .

  9. #9
    Senior Member hikerbrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    Good for you. I did Mt. Monadnock via Cliff Walk (longer then White Dot,etc) one very humid day. It had a heat index of 75 which was the worst in the whole state according to WMUR. I went anyway. Well I've done that hike a million times. I got pretty dizzy ( and I drank plenty of fluids and energy snacks) too towards the last mile or less. At the summit I felt funny still. Never usually get like that so I went to see a doc after and had a complete testing for heart. Ultra sound on a tread mill etc. I was clear and good to know.

    I don't tolerate the heat anyway I have that condition inherited were you sweat a bunch often while others don't.
    About 18 months ago, my dad (very fit, 70 at the time), and my mom (less fit, 67 at the time) hiked Manadnock. Inexplicably, my dad was having a hard time keeping up with my mom. Felt funny at the top. Felt funny at the bottom. Still felt funny the following morning. Went to see PCP. Rushed to hospital, ended up having emergency bypass surgery (quad) the next day. He didn't actually have a heart attack, but he was 97% blocked in one artery, and mostly blocked in 3 others. None of us would have ever suspected. He's simply not a candidate for coronary artery disease according to any biomarkers. I'm not either, except for the genetic factor, which is probably the most important one. That and age.

    Grappling with one's own mortality is not that much fun. But if that reckoning puts us on a path to make the most of every day, there's value in it. Huge value.

    I'm sorry for this family for their loss. It'll probably be me someday. On a bike ride, or a hike, or moving dirt around in my yard when it's just a little too hot. Best to make the most of today, and tomorrow.
    Sure. Why not.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Hey, have any of you guys every had one of those arterial scans that can detect blockages?

    About once a year I get a come-on in the mail that the "The Mobile Scanner will be in my area soon" and for $150 I can cheat death by getting my arteries scanned. And they'll throw in a bone density test too.

    I talked to my doc about it and he said get it if you're curious or concerned. But it kinda smelled of snake oil so I never did it.

    What do you think? Worth getting or not?
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
    .

  11. #11
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    Yes, you are talking about Lifeline Screening. I've done it a couple times; they have been very professional.

    It generates useful data for your doctor to review, at a reasonable price.

  12. #12
    Senior Member maineguy's Avatar
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    Definitely not snake oil. I've had the arterial ultrasound done as well as the bone density scan, which is radiography. They are worthwhile tests which can reveal unseen problems before they become big ones.

  13. #13
    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    Hey, have any of you guys every had one of those arterial scans that can detect blockages?

    About once a year I get a come-on in the mail that the "The Mobile Scanner will be in my area soon" and for $150 I can cheat death by getting my arteries scanned. And they'll throw in a bone density test too.

    I talked to my doc about it and he said get it if you're curious or concerned. But it kinda smelled of snake oil so I never did it.

    What do you think? Worth getting or not?

    After that high heat index day hike I had the ultra sound and treadmill test (with dye?) done and the tech said nothing will show unless it's more then 60% of the artery blockage or what ever they were looking for. If it can't be detected until 60% that's not great. Been years now since that test. Maybe they have better methods now for detecting these issues.

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