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Thread: TY Gagne's new book is out (Spoiler Alert!)

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  2. #17
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    Where are you folks buying this book?

    It’s out of stock on Amazon, not listed on Mountain Wanderer, and unknown on Barnes and Noble.
    I got my copy on Amazon but I ordered the day it came out thanks to Sierra's post. It indicated a one month lead time but it wound up shipping in about a week. IIRC his last book didn't have a lot of copies initially either and I had to wait a bit to get that one.
    “Sometimes when you’ve lost something in your life that matters, the only thing left to do is go and find it.” Renan Ozturk

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    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    This shows as backordered now too although it does list actual local shops that may have a copy.
    “Sometimes when you’ve lost something in your life that matters, the only thing left to do is go and find it.” Renan Ozturk

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    Senior Member jniehof's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    It’s out of stock on Amazon, not listed on Mountain Wanderer, and unknown on Barnes and Noble.
    Steve said he'll list it once he has them in stock; there were definitely printing delays.

  5. #20
    Senior Member kmac's Avatar
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    Just finished a virtual Zoom with Gibson Books and the author Ty Gagne and his new book The Last Traverse. I am looking forward to reading the Last Traverse, just finishing, "Where You'll Find Me"

    .
    "Experience is a difficult teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson last."
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    Where You'll Find Me by Ty Gagne

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    Senior Member roadtripper's Avatar
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    Thanks for the heads up on this. Added it to the wish list. His first book is the one of the best SAR-related books of all time, anywhere.

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    Just finished it; terrific read. In particular the chapter on human factors and the discussion on "heuristic traps" was really interesting. Its a concept developed from avalanche accident research.
    https://www.summitpost.org/human-fac...cidents/188636

  8. #23
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmac View Post
    Just finished a virtual Zoom with Gibson Books and the author Ty Gagne and his new book The Last Traverse. I am looking forward to reading the Last Traverse, just finishing, "Where You'll Find Me"

    .
    I attended that Zoom meeting as well. I was not that impressed and as a result cancelled my book order.

  9. #24
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazzert View Post
    Just finished it; terrific read. In particular the chapter on human factors and the discussion on "heuristic traps" was really interesting. Its a concept developed from avalanche accident research.
    https://www.summitpost.org/human-fac...cidents/188636
    One of the references in Ty's first book was for another book on this topic (another author - not him). I wound up reading and enjoyed. I believe the author called it Type 1 and Type 2 thinking and how the whole way that the vast majority of decisions we make is done on autopilot to save processing power for more important stuff so it doesn't totally bog down the mind and prevent action of any kind. Can lead to many logic traps based on our experiences.
    “Sometimes when you’ve lost something in your life that matters, the only thing left to do is go and find it.” Renan Ozturk

  10. #25
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    One of the references in Ty's first book was for another book on this topic (another author - not him). I wound up reading and enjoyed. I believe the author called it Type 1 and Type 2 thinking and how the whole way that the vast majority of decisions we make is done on autopilot to save processing power for more important stuff so it doesn't totally bog down the mind and prevent action of any kind. Can lead to many logic traps based on our experiences.
    One way out of that trap is the use of checklists. Not done in hiking but a given in aviation. When things go wrong and don't seem to add up, go to the list for a logical and clear problem solving strategy. Doing so pulls you out of the moment and allows you to get some perspective on the bigger picture.

    I also think social pressure is a factor in many accidents. Who wants to be the sissy that first cries wolf? Folks will literally walk off a cliff to avoid that stigma.

    I am reading Ty's book now and I find it engaging. His research is thorough and exhaustive. It is heartbreaking that these two victims, who successfully survived so much and came very close to escaping their fate, were overcome in the end. They actually did a lot right.

    A sobering story for all of us that venture up high in Winter.
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  11. #26
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    I totally agree with that. I think that is probably the result of one of the hikers surviving and being able to fill in many of the details we were only able to guess at with Kate. I don't know if it was just me too but there were what seemed to me to be some pretty epic blunders by the SAR teams that went out onto Little Haystack from a navigational point of view. Anyone else question some of the things done from a procedural point of view, not so much judgements made?
    I just finished the book and thought it was extremely well done and very meticulously detailed. I'm not sure if we can openly discuss it yet but it has been out for a month now. While the search of the summit of Little Haystack was not perfectly coordinated, I am curious as to what you characterized as "epic blunders . . from a navigational point of view." I thought they did well to find both hikers given the absolutely horrendous conditions.
    "I am a pilgrim and a stranger"

  12. #27
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    I attended that Zoom meeting as well. I was not that impressed and as a result cancelled my book order.
    Hey Sierra, what did you hear at that Zoom meeting that soured you on the book and caused you to cancel your order?
    Last edited by Grey J; 12-30-2020 at 11:00 AM. Reason: spelling
    "I am a pilgrim and a stranger"

  13. #28
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    One of the heroes, or central figures, in Kate's story becomes a victim in this story. We all make mistakes when we are younger. We call them learning experiences when we are older.

    I keep wanting to turn the heat up in the house thinking about these two books.
    Who is that? A hero in the Matrosova book that becomes a victim in this story? Although I read it, I don't have the Matrosova book to reference. Are you referring to Ober?
    I know what you mean about wanting to turn up the heat. Wind chills of -50* to -60* sent a shiver up my spine every time I started a new chapter.

    One final comment: Perhaps because they were not involved in the actual rescue, Tim Martel and Steve Dupuis (MRS 3) did not receive enough recognition (imo) for their heroic efforts to reach the scene that night. They were the only team to complete a loop hike over a 1.8 mile stretch of Franconia Ridge, breaking trail in deep snow until their descent down Falling Waters Trail. The other teams all turned around or, in the case of MRS 1, were helicoptered out. An 8 mile night hike under these conditions was an incredible feat of strength, endurance, and determination.
    "I am a pilgrim and a stranger"

  14. #29
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey J View Post
    Who is that? A hero in the Matrosova book that becomes a victim in this story? Although I read it, I don't have the Matrosova book to reference. Are you referring to Ober?
    I know what you mean about wanting to turn up the heat. Wind chills of -50* to -60* sent a shiver up my spine every time I started a new chapter.

    One final comment: Perhaps because they were not involved in the actual rescue, Tim Martel and Steve Dupuis (MRS 3) did not receive enough recognition (imo) for their heroic efforts to reach the scene that night. They were the only team to complete a loop hike over a 1.8 mile stretch of Franconia Ridge, breaking trail in deep snow until their descent down Falling Waters Trail. The other teams all turned around or, in the case of MRS 1, were helicoptered out. An 8 mile night hike under these conditions was an incredible feat of strength, endurance, and determination.
    Just finished reading the book and agree on all counts. A couple of observations and questions:

    1. Would an ICU nurse really tell a patient who briefly surfaced from a coma his friend was dead? Was this exchange fabricated for drama sake?

    2. Ober -- is carrying a 75 pound pack really useful under these circumstances or a mistake?

    3. How come there are so few tall cairns on Franci Ridge for use in low/no visibility?

    4. Apparently FW trail junction is hard to find in winter. Martel found it due to ice ax left behind by others. Better signage needed?

    Regarding number 4, there have been several winter accidents due to inability to locate a trail as it drops below treeline into scrub. Southern end of Crawford Path and Ammo below Lakes Hut are two that come to mind. Are there others?

    Finally, that Obs wind plot that showed the wind going from 30 to 70 mph in three minutes was amazing. These poor guys were very unlucky.
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
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  15. #30
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post

    Finally, that Obs wind plot that showed the wind going from 30 to 70 mph in three minutes was amazing. These poor guys were very unlucky.
    Kudos to the SAR teams. Much like Kate M. they should have not been there in the first place.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

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