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Thread: Any experience with an Atlas SnowShoe Authorized Repair center?

  1. #16
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    If supplies run really low one can always type in "DIY snowshoes" in YouTube search box...

  2. #17
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remix View Post
    Well I hope I have a better experience than you. Basically he is sending me 2 heel straps and nuts/screws/washers on trust that I will send him a $30 check upon receipt.

    He is listed as an Atlas ARC not sure about Tubbs. Of course there is another ARC listed for Atlas in Oregon.
    I don't know how these heel straps look like or how they are mounted but I bet you can buy some generic synthetic straps (probably 1/2 inch would be strong enough) and some screws / washers / rivets to fix this yourself. It will just take some more effort & care.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    I don't know how these heel straps look like or how they are mounted but I bet you can buy some generic synthetic straps (probably 1/2 inch would be strong enough) and some screws / washers / rivets to fix this yourself. It will just take some more effort & care.
    A dog collar would probably work.

  4. #19
    Senior Member griffin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remix View Post
    K & D Tent & Awning
    1131 Milwaukee Ave
    South Milwaukee, WI 53172-2012
    414-764-8820
    kdtent@outlook.com
    That's the same outfit that replaced the bindings on my old Atlas 833's. I can't remember exactly what broke, but I sent the a picture and they recommended replacing the entire binding/suspension on both shoes. They had already been relegated to spare/loaner/stomping pee-paths-in-the-yard-for-the-dog status but the cost was reasonable and I think it only took a few weeks. Granted, that was a few years ago and we weren't dealing with COVID-related shortages and shipping delays. They did a nice job.
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  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    If your snowshoes are 18 years old and the material became brittle then it seems quite likely that you might experience similar problem in other parts of the snowshoe that uses the same type of material (perhaps just on the other snowshoe.) While I generally prefer to repair things rather than throw the away I think at some point you need to evaluate if it is really worth fixing and what is the risk if, for example, you experienced another failure on the trail? If it can be remediated with a simple field repair then perhaps trying to repair is the way to go, but if the failure on the trail is non-trivial then maybe a new pair of snowshoes is the right choice to make.
    By coincidence, my 17 year old Atlas 1025 snowshoes just had a similar failure on one of the urethane straps between the crampon and binding straps. There doesn't seem to be any damage that may have caused the failure and the material is still flexible. I noticed the failure as I was attaching them to my boots at a trailhead. Time for a new pair, maybe they will outlast me this time.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    I talked to him, described the issue I had and he said he'd send me a part. He never did. My repeated text messages were ignored.

    He did say that due to Covid his hours of operation were greatly reduced.
    ChrisB- You were right. The guy ghosted me despite several texts. I let Atlas know because I was really convinced that the snowshoes would be all set by now.
    Last edited by Remix; 01-20-2021 at 05:19 PM.

  7. #22
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    I just got parts from this guy for my Tubbs FlexAlps, and it was painless (USPS delivery delays not withstanding). You should also know he had a delay in receiving hardware he'd ordered in mid December and told me yesterday he'd just received it. This could be the cause of your delay (I agree a reply to that effect would have been nice.)

    He answered my texts pretty promptly, usually with a phone call, but he is quite busy and also short parts as far as snowshoe repairs go - for the same reason(s) the manufacturers are - high demand and (no) low supply.

    Tim
    Last edited by bikehikeskifish; 01-20-2021 at 07:11 PM.
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  8. #23
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    Maybe he does not have parts for Atlas 1225's but he got my photos and led me to believe I would have new straps in a week. I will call Atlas as and see if they can spare a strap. But if anyone is going to toss out a pair of Atlas 12XX pls pm me.
    Last edited by Remix; 01-22-2021 at 05:02 PM.

  9. #24
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remix View Post
    ChrisB- You were right. The guy ghosted me despite several texts. I let Atlas know because I was really convinced that the snowshoes would be all set by now.
    Bummer. This is not good PR for either Atlas or Tubbs.

    I'd hate to rat on the guy but jeez, is it so hard to follow through or tell a customer you can't? Maybe to be expected from an awning shop rather than an outdoor store.

    We all might have better luck with the repair outlet in Oregon.
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  10. #25
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    I had done the heel strap repair 2 years ago on my Atlas 1233's, that I think I bought around 2002. I have the habit of collecting various straps from outdoor gear destined for refuse and used that red super durable neoprene strapping Tubbs was using on wood snowshoes and bindings, along with screw/post fastener. I thought I was all good, but since I mainly use my wooden snowshoes numerous times a week, I didn't notice a more serious problem with the 1233's until too late.

    So I met up with a friend in Walpole, NH this weekend to check out a new trail he was building on his land, and when I pulled out the Atlases the grey rubbery plastic binding foot harness was crumbled along pressure/fold seams and just falling apart- there was nothing solid anymore to fashion any type of repair. Thinking back it kind of looks like they may have spent a summer in the cab of my truck under a pile of gear with heat extremes attacking the material and weight on the folded down binding. Luckily my friend had a pair of all things- Sherpa's from the 1990's for me to use.

    Reading this thread makes me unlikely to contact the company for any repair or warranty. Most likely I will attach an extra old Tubbs neoprene A type binding to the crampon plate with screw/post fasteners. Iverson makes them now https://iversonssnowshoes.com/produc...prene-binding/

  11. #26
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew View Post
    Reading this thread makes me unlikely to contact the company for any repair or warranty. Most likely I will attach an extra old Tubbs neoprene A type binding to the crampon plate with screw/post fasteners. Iverson makes them now https://iversonssnowshoes.com/produc...prene-binding/
    Why? We have one person with a bad experience and a whole host of people egging the OP on. I had a good experience, as did the person who recommended this service to me. We've all discovered the downside of the pandemic and outdoor activities - they are crowded and gear is hard to find.

    Tim
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  12. #27
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    I use the linked Iverson AA bindings on my army surplus magnesium powder shoes (the US military bindings are the worst and almost unusable). In general they are great replacement for conventional (non pivoting) snow shoe bindings.

    The Iverson's are quite robust but would require some mods to mate up with a Sherpa type rotary binding. My guess is it would need to be riveted or screwed to the old baseplate. I suspect it may be more of a challenge to mate up with a MSR rotary binding. They work better with rigid boots and can squeeze a bit on soft boots. One of the old Sherpa designs had a front strap with a hook that flipped up over the front toe that got laced in to keep the boot from sliding forward. It was important for kick stepping up steep slopes. It worked but made lacing up a bit more challenging. Definitely not as quick or convenient as modern bindings.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 02-09-2021 at 08:47 AM.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    Why? We have one person with a bad experience and a whole host of people egging the OP on. I had a good experience, as did the person who recommended this service to me. We've all discovered the downside of the pandemic and outdoor activities - they are crowded and gear is hard to find.

    Tim
    Tim, just my natural tendency to find it easier to fix things myself. If there is any difficulty sourcing things, in my world it is often easier to make do and possibly find a better way with less complication. I also find appeal to more simple and maybe old-fashioned gear. Ironically the Sherpa's borrowed from my friend were a flimsier consumer version of the old standard that was produced for a few years. I remember seeing those and the simple floppy looking binding that were on them and thinking "ok looking snowshoe, but what's up with the crappy binding?". Lo and behold that crappy binding outlived the fancy ones on my Atlases!

    When I bought the 1233's I had some reservation towards the fancy binding with all it's little clicky things and springs and hoped for the best. The one thing I really liked was the open-toe design which would accommodate 3-pin boots when needed, but also I like to be able to adjust the foot placement for best rocker point. My first ever snowshoes were a pair of Alaskan 10x56 wood/leather and the first I ever bought were Green Mountain Bearpaws which are still today my go-to shoes in the woods. I have worked for years in the woods with GreenMt Bearpaws and every imaginal 'quick-binding' to account for work such as going on and off roofs, chainsawing and tree work etc. and find the A binding as the best of all worlds- including an open toe design.

    added
    This thread made me think of when I had a pair of Green Mt Bearpaws that had split on the wooden frame right on a natural wood grain with no traumatic force. It was right when Tubbs had moved to Stowe and became the Stowe Snowshoe and Canoe Company. I arrived at their new location sometime in 1993 with broken shoe in hand and asked if they had a replacement. They questioned my standing on a warranty and luckily I had some info in my pocket from them from the past that listed "Lifetime Warranty".

    The look between the 2 new owners spoke volumes at that moment, like "what did we buy into". I wonder if this is what new buyers of some of these outdoor equipment companies are thinking now.

    Peakbagger- I seem to have no issue with the foot slide since I have a high volume forefoot on the top of my foot, so they hug me like a glove but can see that as a problem for sure for some.
    Last edited by Andrew; 02-09-2021 at 11:27 AM.

  14. #29
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    It turns out I didn't have the spare A bindings on hand that I wanted to use as replacements on my Atlas 1233's. So trying not to be such a curmudgeon I decided to contact Atlas for a repair or repair supplies today. Surprisingly I found the original invoice from 2001, and the helpful person from Atlas quickly had me on track to send them for a full replacement. Problem is they have no shoes right now to send me as a replacement, and besides I want to keep these shoes since they are the last year the frame was all aluminum with the tails welded, not with the plastic tail-joiner they use ever since.
    I tried to pry it out of the rep that I heard about authorized repair centers as an option to receive repair parts, but he was not offering this option and said they don't have bindings to send out.
    So it looks like I'm back to being a curmudgeon due to my unwillingness to try new gear and will order some old reliable bindings instead.

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