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Thread: Hiking shoes for those who need support: Hoka TenNineGTX

  1. #1
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Hiking shoes for those who need support: Hoka TenNineGTX

    Outside's Gear Guy has a review of the Hoka TenNineGTX, and it's extremely positive.

    The reviews are fantastic, if you can get over the looks of them. I use different Hoka One One shoes both for road and trail running, and they're fantastic products.

    Brian

  2. #2
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    I tried Hoka and found them to be way to cushy. Fortunately I got them from REI so I returned them. The salesman said either you love ‘em or hate them. I was in the latter category.
    Last edited by skiguy; 03-11-2021 at 01:14 PM.
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    Senior Member Rhody Seth's Avatar
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    Those things look wild.

    I've had a couple pairs of Hokas for road running and enjoyed them. I tried a pair for the trails but found they rolled on me too much and relegated them to road use instead.

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    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    I have a friend, he has a few extra pounds on him, and when we hike, his knee bothers him. I was thinking these shoes might be good for him, providing just a tad more cushion that might allow him to keep hiking without doing permanent damage.

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    Senior Member maineguy's Avatar
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    I have seen lots of literature (an Oregon State study in 2018 comes to mind) that states that these super cushioning shoes actually result in increased impact loads on your legs. It sounds counterintuitive, but it has been studied for a few years now. Now these were dealing with running shoes, but I would think that they would apply to hiking shoes as well.
    Last edited by maineguy; 03-12-2021 at 06:57 PM.

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    Senior Member Barkingcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post
    I have a friend, he has a few extra pounds on him, and when we hike, his knee bothers him. I was thinking these shoes might be good for him, providing just a tad more cushion that might allow him to keep hiking without doing permanent damage.
    I know that it may seem like a chicken and egg situation, but just losing a few pounds (through lower food intake) can really, really help alleviate the knee stress and pain. And that makes the hiking more enjoyable, which can then lead to more weight loss.

    Quote Originally Posted by maineguy View Post
    I have seen lots of literature (an Oregon State study in 2018 comes to mind) that states that these super cushioning shoes actually result in increased impact loads on your legs. It sounds counterintuitive, but it has been studied for a few years now. Now these were dealing with running shoes, but I would think that they would apply to hiking shoes as well.
    Yes; this study out of Finland was one that I had seen. It helped convince me to stick with trail runners that are less cushioned; same with my hiking boots.

    On a related subject, I don't know how long those Hokas would last with some of the hiking that I do -- they don't look particularly rugged?

  7. #7
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    The problem with the Hokas which were highly cushioned trail runners I had was what seemed like reduced energy transfer. They were so cushy I felt very little rebound from the shoe itself while hiking. I felt I actually had to put more energy into each step to get the same propulsion than if I were using a lighter weight shoe.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  8. #8
    Senior Member Barkingcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    The problem with the Hokas which were highly cushioned trail runners I had was what seemed like reduced energy transfer. They were so cushy I felt very little rebound from the shoe itself while hiking. I felt I actually had to put more energy into each step to get the same propulsion than if I were using a lighter weight shoe.
    Good point.

    One other thing that I thought of, regarding use of a highly cushioned hiking boot: because of the cushioning of the shoe, I would think that there might be more unwanted lateral movement of the knee, which might increase stress?

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