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Thread: Fatality on Hunter Mountain (Catskills)

  1. #1
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Fatality on Hunter Mountain (Catskills)

    Tom Rankin
    Web Master - NY Forest Fire Lookout Association
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    Past President - Catskill 3500 Club
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  2. #2
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Tom,

    How technical is that trail? The rescue report says...

    The steep, icy trail forced rangers to rig rope systems and a sked rescue stretcher for the technical descent down Becker Hollow trail.
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
    .

  3. #3
    Senior Member Puma concolor's Avatar
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    It’s a regular old hiking trail. Nothing particularly noteworthy. Steepish in parts in the upper reaches but still solidly class 1 ... was up it with with my 10-year-old a couple of summers ago. I think the extrication was probably made more complicated by the melt and refreeze cycles of the last couple of weeks.

    Sorry to hear about this.
    Last edited by Puma concolor; 03-19-2021 at 11:20 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    The trails up from 214 all have pretty steep pitches, no scrambling but similar to NH's Ammo above Gem Pool or Beaver Brook from 112. (Steep staircase for several tenths of a mile)

    Like Beaver Brook, it's a place with little afternoon sunshine. I did this hike for Y2K, it seemed a good place where all that failing tech was going to fall out of the sky. After the warm weather the days before, it likely could be icy.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Puma concolor's Avatar
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    ... and just because it’s not technical hiking/climbing terrain doesn’t mean it’s inaccurate to call the extrication (recovery) technical. Ropes and other equipment were required for it, thus making it technical.
    Last edited by Puma concolor; 03-19-2021 at 01:41 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    It's moderately steep and it's side-hilling quite a bit. It it was icy, even worse. I'm not sure why they did not go up to the clearing where there was a waiting snowmobile. ??
    Tom Rankin
    Web Master - NY Forest Fire Lookout Association
    Volunteer - Balsam Lake Mountain
    Past President - Catskill 3500 Club
    CEO - Views and Brews

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Do we know how far from the top and clearing they were and can you connect a winch to a snowmobile? Assuming the terrain was such that you could not walk down, or up very easily carrying a litter, lowering would be easier. With a couple of ropes some padding to make sure you did not fray the ropes or damage the trees (like you were setting up a top roping anchors, and some people to guide the litter, gravity could assist you in lowering the body.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Puma concolor's Avatar
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    A little more detail including the identity of the hiker ... Robert Gerity, said to be an avid hiker who died doing what he loved.

    https://www.hudsonvalley360.com/news...942fd7ac8.html

  9. #9
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P. View Post
    Do we know how far from the top and clearing they were and can you connect a winch to a snowmobile? Assuming the terrain was such that you could not walk down, or up very easily carrying a litter, lowering would be easier. With a couple of ropes some padding to make sure you did not fray the ropes or damage the trees (like you were setting up a top roping anchors, and some people to guide the litter, gravity could assist you in lowering the body.
    The stated half mile is mostly on a mellow part of the trail. But I wasn't there. In any case, glad we have the Rangers to assist with these tough situations.
    Tom Rankin
    Web Master - NY Forest Fire Lookout Association
    Volunteer - Balsam Lake Mountain
    Past President - Catskill 3500 Club
    CEO - Views and Brews

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