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Thread: So what are you plans 3 years from today April 8th 2024

  1. #16
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    Mt Aziscohos on the Me NH border might be a nice place to view it. Its prominent summit with open views 360 degrees.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 04-11-2021 at 01:18 PM.

  2. #17
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    I think I will be officially retired, collecting social security and a pension and living as a nomad in a converted cargo trailer. I think I'll go view it in Texas.

  3. #18
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Nessmuk is of course correct. I've witnessed 3 eclipses, and you can use your eyes, binoculars, or even a small telescope to view a TOTAL eclipse. There are other safe ways to view it. You can project it onto a piece of paper thru binocs or a scope (but this can heat up the internals, do it briefly). You can watch the shadows on the ground start to become sharper and see crescent shaped points of light where before there were circles. A welder's glass rated 14 or higher is safe. An eclipse is something that can not be adequately described with words. And it's more than just a few minutes of totality, the experience lasts over an hour.

    And yes, the local area can become quite crowded with people, but this eclipse will cover quite a bit of the US. I doubt people will travel to small towns in upstate NE, unless they are already close by, (or the towns start huge publicity campaigns!)

    And for peakbaggers, Katahdin is almost dead center in the path, but good luck with that!
    Tom Rankin
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  4. #19
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    In general, mountainous regions are poor places to view an eclipse--the probability of clear skies is low and if the local area is cloudy the roads will clog up rapidly.

    In 2017, I was with a group of serious eclipse watchers. We met at a hotel in central Missouri with a local viewing site and an alternate in western Missouri. Both were predicted to be cloudy, so we did a last-minute 5-hr dash to a site in Illinois just short of the Tennessee border. We had a few passing clouds, but the sky was clear for the main event.

    Yes, you need eye (and camera) protection (sun-viewing glasses or a solar filter) if any part of the sun's disk is visible. Naked eye viewing and unfiltered camera use is safe during totality (a max of ~6 minutes--depends on the eclipse and your location).

    A total eclipse is an amazing and spectacular event--I highly recommend viewing one if you get the chance. (Some of the members of the above group have traveled world-wide to view them.)

    Doug
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  5. #20
    Senior Member maineguy's Avatar
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    Viewing from the Grand Teton...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKFryKqXWFo

  6. #21
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    In 2017, I was with a group of serious eclipse watchers. We met at a hotel in central Missouri with a local viewing site and an alternate in western Missouri. Both were predicted to be cloudy, so we did a last-minute 5-hr dash to a site in Illinois just short of the Tennessee border. We had a few passing clouds, but the sky was clear for the main event.

    Doug
    Interesting, I was in the town of Union in eastern MO, right on the center line under a perfectly clear blue sky at the time. My friend and I had two telescopes for direct optical viewing, wives had binoculars doing the same. I learned from previous eclipses that for this one I was going to simply enjoy the view for the maximum time rather than mess round wasting time with phoography. There would be plenty of available photos later better than I could make.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

  7. #22
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessmuk View Post
    Interesting, I was in the town of Union in eastern MO, right on the center line under a perfectly clear blue sky at the time. My friend and I had two telescopes for direct optical viewing, wives had binoculars doing the same. I learned from previous eclipses that for this one I was going to simply enjoy the view for the maximum time rather than mess round wasting time with phoography. There would be plenty of available photos later better than I could make.
    Our base was in Columbia (central MO) and our observing site was a church-yard in Marion, IL. The pastor was observing it himself and invited us to join him. All 130 of us... The traffic jam on the way home was pretty impressive.

    Yes--one does have to be careful that one does not spend all of one's attention on the cameras and miss the eclipse. I used a lot of automation to minimize my workload and was able to devote most of my attention to the eclipse:
    * Camera 1 near totality:
    - automatic 7-exposure brackets (preset 1)
    - solar filter
    - triggered by an intervalometer
    * Camera 1 during totality:
    - automatic 7-exposure brackets (preset 2)
    - no filter
    - manually triggered by camera sounds (didn't need to look at camera)
    * Camera 2: timelapse. Required no attention near totality.
    * The cameras were mounted on a tracker so aim was not an issue.

    I'm now 2 for 3. Success in 1970, skunked in 1991...

    Doug

  8. #23
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maineguy View Post
    Viewing from the Grand Teton...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKFryKqXWFo
    I was not on the summit, but I was pretty close by, down on the flats. It was spectacular!
    Tom Rankin
    Web Master - NY Forest Fire Lookout Association
    Volunteer - Balsam Lake Mountain
    Past President - Catskill 3500 Club
    CEO - Views and Brews

  9. #24
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    I was not on the summit, but I was pretty close by, down on the flats. It was spectacular!
    I would recommend a clear sky summit with a view toward the southwest if you can arrange that configuration. I was on an elevated area in 1970 overlooking Chesapeake Bay and the sight of the dark shadow edge rushing toward me at 1000mph almost made me dive for cover. It was as if a solid steel door was closing over me, and I almost had to wonder why there was no sound from the slam. Viewing the same from a high mountain peak with open views toward the oncoming shadow would be even more impressive.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

  10. #25
    Senior Member Cumulus's Avatar
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    I was thinking of North Percy. What I'll probably do, though, is reserve a place to stay in the area the nights before and after and decide where to go at the last minute based on weather forcasts.

    --

    Cumulus

    NE111 in my 50s: 115/115 (67/67, 46/46, 2/2)
    NE111 in my 60s: 76/115 (53/67, 21/46, 2/2)
    NEFF: 50/50; Cat35: 39/39; WNH4K: 41/48; NEHH 89/100
    LT NB 2009; CT NB 2017

    "I don't much care where [I get to] --" said Alice, "-- so long as I get somewhere," ...
    "Oh, you're sure to do that," said the Cat, "if you only walk long enough."
    - Lewis Carroll

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cumulus View Post
    I was thinking of North Percy. What I'll probably do, though, is reserve a place to stay in the area the nights before and after and decide where to go at the last minute based on weather forcasts.

    --

    Cumulus

    NE111 in my 50s: 115/115 (67/67, 46/46, 2/2)
    NE111 in my 60s: 76/115 (53/67, 21/46, 2/2)
    NEFF: 50/50; Cat35: 39/39; WNH4K: 41/48; NEHH 89/100
    LT NB 2009; CT NB 2017

    "I don't much care where [I get to] --" said Alice, "-- so long as I get somewhere," ...
    "Oh, you're sure to do that," said the Cat, "if you only walk long enough."
    - Lewis Carroll
    The one caveat with North Percy is that the Nash Stream road gate may not be open yet. The summit is still accessible but its either a mountain bike ride up the closed road or the Coos Trail coming in from the SE side . My guess is the campsite on the CT on the NE slope of Percy will be popular. Of course if the gate is closed there will be less crowding. Nevertheless a great pick!

    In that same area, Sugarloaf just up the road is another good summit.

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