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Thread: So what are you plans 3 years from today April 8th 2024

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  1. #1
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    So what are you plans 3 years from today April 8th 2024

    https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/april-8-2024

    Looks like the edge of totality might just skim the northern edge of the WMNF but the centerline is farther north in Errol and Pittsburg or parts of Northwestern Maine and over towards Moosehead lake. BSP is in the path but its typically closed this time of year. Les Otten had best get going on his resort as accommodations up in that area are pretty slim. Pittsburg bans all overnight camping except at private campgrounds.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 04-09-2021 at 12:38 PM.

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    My plan for this one was originally Roger's Ledge but now I'm thinking I'll need to find another option if I don't want a lot of company.

  3. #3
    Member JToll's Avatar
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    Looks a good time to go the the Northeast Kingdom in Vermont.
    NH 4K: 48/48, VT 4K: 5/5, NY 4K: 2/46

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    Weather in that part of April can be iffy and private roads can be closed due to mud season. In general the road network can get plugged up with traffic and my guess many folks will be heading north on I 91 so gettingto where you want to go will be the challenge.

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    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    In general, mountainous regions are poor places to view an eclipse--the probability of clear skies is low and if the local area is cloudy the roads will clog up rapidly.

    In 2017, I was with a group of serious eclipse watchers. We met at a hotel in central Missouri with a local viewing site and an alternate in western Missouri. Both were predicted to be cloudy, so we did a last-minute 5-hr dash to a site in Illinois just short of the Tennessee border. We had a few passing clouds, but the sky was clear for the main event.

    Yes, you need eye (and camera) protection (sun-viewing glasses or a solar filter) if any part of the sun's disk is visible. Naked eye viewing and unfiltered camera use is safe during totality (a max of ~6 minutes--depends on the eclipse and your location).

    A total eclipse is an amazing and spectacular event--I highly recommend viewing one if you get the chance. (Some of the members of the above group have traveled world-wide to view them.)

    Doug
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    In 2017, I was with a group of serious eclipse watchers. We met at a hotel in central Missouri with a local viewing site and an alternate in western Missouri. Both were predicted to be cloudy, so we did a last-minute 5-hr dash to a site in Illinois just short of the Tennessee border. We had a few passing clouds, but the sky was clear for the main event.

    Doug
    Interesting, I was in the town of Union in eastern MO, right on the center line under a perfectly clear blue sky at the time. My friend and I had two telescopes for direct optical viewing, wives had binoculars doing the same. I learned from previous eclipses that for this one I was going to simply enjoy the view for the maximum time rather than mess round wasting time with phoography. There would be plenty of available photos later better than I could make.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

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    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessmuk View Post
    Interesting, I was in the town of Union in eastern MO, right on the center line under a perfectly clear blue sky at the time. My friend and I had two telescopes for direct optical viewing, wives had binoculars doing the same. I learned from previous eclipses that for this one I was going to simply enjoy the view for the maximum time rather than mess round wasting time with phoography. There would be plenty of available photos later better than I could make.
    Our base was in Columbia (central MO) and our observing site was a church-yard in Marion, IL. The pastor was observing it himself and invited us to join him. All 130 of us... The traffic jam on the way home was pretty impressive.

    Yes--one does have to be careful that one does not spend all of one's attention on the cameras and miss the eclipse. I used a lot of automation to minimize my workload and was able to devote most of my attention to the eclipse:
    * Camera 1 near totality:
    - automatic 7-exposure brackets (preset 1)
    - solar filter
    - triggered by an intervalometer
    * Camera 1 during totality:
    - automatic 7-exposure brackets (preset 2)
    - no filter
    - manually triggered by camera sounds (didn't need to look at camera)
    * Camera 2: timelapse. Required no attention near totality.
    * The cameras were mounted on a tracker so aim was not an issue.

    I'm now 2 for 3. Success in 1970, skunked in 1991...

    Doug

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    Senior Member maineguy's Avatar
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    My sister lives in Jackson Hole and has first hand experience of what happens when the eclipse comes to town. I don't plan on being anywhere near that path.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    My home in northern NY is barely within the zone of totality. 60 miles away, my brother has a camp on the shore of Lake Ontario, very close to the cener line. I may go there, or to my daughter's home in Plattsburgh, also near the center line.

    Given favorable weather, I think it would be easy to avoid any annoying crowds in my region. Either way, even under clouds, a total solar eclipse is a life experience not to be missed. You will never forget the experience. My first total eclipse expedition was in 1970, when I drove with college buddies to the north end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. I was on an overlook where I could see the edge of the shadow russhing toward me over the water at 1000 mph. A truly ominous feeling. The next year I traveled north to Cap Chat Quebec for a mostly clouded out event, though still an impressive experence. In 2017 I visited a retrired military buddy whose home was on the center line in Missouri under perfectly clear skies. I don't have a lot of hope for clear skies in April 2024, but may travel if necessary to a forecast clear area if it is bad near my home area. Don't miss it!
    Last edited by Nessmuk; 04-09-2021 at 06:56 AM.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

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    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    It's a Monday a week after Easter which falls on 3/31/2024. VRBO or Air BNB might the how to take three of four days to enjoy

    Also looks like part of the ADK falls under the path also, as well as Rochester and Buffalo and Niagara Falls. Since you can't look directly at an Eclipse, is above treeline where I want to be or looking at Niagara Falls under that kind of lighting?
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

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    You went up to Saratoga
    and your horse naturally won
    Then you...

  12. #12
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldEric View Post
    You went up to Saratoga
    and your horse naturally won
    Then you...
    Wow you really are Old...Eric! I'm thinking Jamestown, NY.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  13. #13
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldEric View Post
    You went up to Saratoga
    and your horse naturally won
    Then you...

    That was the Eclipse in Nova Scotia, the one where I was clouded out in Cap Chat, Quebec.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

  14. #14
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    You can look at an eclipse through the proper shade filter. The last time around all sorts of folks were selling filters that were not certified and could cause eye damage. And of course the former president declared that squinting real hard was good enough.

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    I just hope I'm still breathing

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