Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: Black Pond and Brutus bushwacks

  1. #1
    Member peakbagger-paul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Brewster, MA
    Posts
    90

    Black Pond and Brutus bushwacks

    On May 22, a user posted the following comment in New England Trail Conditions:

    Black pond and Brutus bushwhacks are trails at this point.

    Has anyone been there more recently? Would I be able to follow them without a GPS? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    MWV NH
    Posts
    333
    Wow. Not surprised though. Was on them a couple times years ago and you most certainly needed a GPS. In fact, one time I wondered off course I want to say around 3200 feet on Owls and it was dense as it could be (I turned north too soon). Eventually wandered north until I hit the then herd path. I suppose that path is a wider trail now.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    6,765
    Two years ago BPB was very easy to find heading out of the Pemi where it diverges off Lincoln Brook trail at the crossing, but not as easy leaving the pond while heading in, there were several false paths that diverged right that would end west of the brook crossing. Brutus was the same, easy heading down not so easy heading up. In the first case if you come out along the brook, just follow the various paths east and you will hit the crossing. If in doubt bear left uphill.

  4. #4
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,940
    They are both well-defined herd paths (went in April and again in May of 2021.) Black Pond has cut saplings for easier navigation in winter, no less. Almost easy to find but easy to follow.




    Tim
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2021-06-01_8-00-39.jpg 
Views:	603 
Size:	113.2 KB 
ID:	6664  
    Last edited by bikehikeskifish; 06-01-2021 at 07:03 AM.
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,164
    My opinion is that if one goes into either "bushwhack" without the ability to navigate off-trail, they may become disoriented or lost. If one goes into the "bushwhacks" expecting to bushwhack, they will likely find it very easy navigationally speaking.

    There are way too many herd paths in both areas at this point. By not establishing official trails in these areas, the environmental impact has been staggering.

    The Black Pond Trail should be sustainably extended to the Lincoln Brook Trail. Likewise, a sustainable path should be established to Owl's Head.

  6. #6
    Member peakbagger-paul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Brewster, MA
    Posts
    90
    Is the GAIA app on an Android phone a reliable GPS? The GAIA map shows both bushwhacks. My only problem with it is that it drains the battery fairly quickly while using it to track your route.

  7. #7
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,940
    The GAIA maps accurately show both the Black Pond and skidder "bushwhacks".

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    MWV NH
    Posts
    333
    Oh the memories. I remember when it was a big deal to traverse over to the “new” summit…

  9. #9
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Middle o Nowhere
    Posts
    1,164
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger-paul View Post
    Is the GAIA app on an Android phone a reliable GPS? The GAIA map shows both bushwhacks. My only problem with it is that it drains the battery fairly quickly while using it to track your route.
    Remember that you can run in Airplane mode when using Gaia. That saves a lot of batt, especially when the phone cannot find service.
    In addition, turn off the Gaia compass and altitude functions to save additional juice.

    cb
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
    .

  10. #10
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,940
    For an Apple/iPhone XR/iOS 14 and GAIA, using airplane mode only (no changes to compass or altitude), I can easily record the presi traverse and pemi loops and still have 40%+ battery left, which includes occasionally leaving airplane mode, and taking pictures. Obviously, not directly applicable to Android, but I do believe the real power drain comes from talking to the towers which requires full power when you are in remote locations.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Scubahhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Woodstock VT
    Posts
    246
    Hmmm... the Gaia map shows what it calls "Owls Head Path" and "Brutus Bushwhack," converging at about 3450' and continuing as the Owls Head Path to the summit at 5026'. It also shows "Black Pond Bushwhack" as a continuous trail from Lincoln Woods Trail to Lincoln Brook Trail. It's quite a sad paradox that "they" prohibited official trails in the "Wilderness" (i.e., north and east from Black Pond) in the name of conservation, thus creating even more of an ecological mess and making it easier rather than more difficult for the uninitiated to get out there and get lost. next thing you know they'll want to put a tramway up Cannon and a train tot he top of Washington.
    Add life to your years!

  12. #12
    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Waltham, MA Jazzbo & Marty meet Bigfoot on Kennebago Divide
    Posts
    1,163
    Other things to know when using Gaia is to turn off Wireless and Bluetooth in phone to conserve battery. Otherwise you phone will consume power hunting for wireless and BT devices. Also important thing with Gaia is you must download a topo map or the Open Streets map you intend to use that will show the "trails" before entering Pemi region which generally does not have line of sight to cell towers except from higher summits where you might be able to pick up cell tower on Loon. Remember Gaia gets map data from cell towers (not GPS Satellite) and if you can't see a cell tower Gaia app will not be able to download the map to show in the App. Therefore you must download map area for region you plan to hike in prior to entering remote areas like Pemi.
    On #67 of NE67
    On #99 of NEHH
    On #46 of WNH48

    An atom walked up to me and said "i think I've lost an electron"
    I said "are you sure?"
    It reply "I'm positive."

  13. #13
    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    AHH....SKYLINE
    Posts
    596
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger-paul View Post
    Is the GAIA app on an Android phone a reliable GPS? The GAIA map shows both bushwhacks. My only problem with it is that it drains the battery fairly quickly while using it to track your route.
    There is a thing called power banks for phones which if I was relying on a phone in the woods I would certainly carry.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Colchester, CT
    Posts
    3,258
    Having the initials of MAP (so APP = appetizer) and looking at the picture bikehikeskifish sent, that would seem like a hard path to lose when there is no snow. At this point, I'd be curious what percentage of people are using the Black Pond BW over the regular trail.

    Having used the Fisherman's bushwhack twice and finding it easy (walk along the river) what is the advantage of using the Black Pond path? Looking at the picture again and just that spot, it looks like it may have little or no bushes/brush to whack and therefore may be easier to avoid walking through brush. That would mean that the BP would have less, when wet, car washing and when dry would be less conducive for picking up ticks.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Ipswich, MA
    Posts
    694
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P. View Post
    Having the initials of MAP (so APP = appetizer) and looking at the picture bikehikeskifish sent, that would seem like a hard path to lose when there is no snow. At this point, I'd be curious what percentage of people are using the Black Pond BW over the regular trail.

    Having used the Fisherman's bushwhack twice and finding it easy (walk along the river) what is the advantage of using the Black Pond path? Looking at the picture again and just that spot, it looks like it may have little or no bushes/brush to whack and therefore may be easier to avoid walking through brush. That would mean that the BP would have less, when wet, car washing and when dry would be less conducive for picking up ticks.
    Every trail report displaying on the current TrailsNH map (12) has used Black Pond. It's a lot easier whacking through open hardwoods than whacking through a riparian zone plus you don't have to navigate the circus that is Franconia Falls. I'm not sure if anyone uses the fisherman's whack anymore.

    Other than lower elevations in the Sandwich and Berlin areas, where are people finding ticks in the Whites?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •