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Thread: GAIA Acquired by Outside Magazine Organization

  1. #46
    Senior Member maineguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post
    I think you're referencing the International Herald Tribune. When I was a graduate student at Oxford, we Americans read it daily, like religion. It pulled the best from the New York Times and the Washington Post. It was fantastic newspaper. I now subscribe to both papers, largely because the IHT got me hooked on them.
    No, I think he is referring to the World Journal Tribune.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Yo...ournal_Tribune

    The IHT was published in Paris

  2. #47
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maineguy View Post
    No, I think he is referring to the World Journal Tribune.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Yo...ournal_Tribune

    The IHT was published in Paris
    https://youtu.be/hQrPyfwDyyE
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  3. #48
    Senior Member maineguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    I love the smell of Gore-Tex in the morning...

  4. #49
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maineguy View Post
    I love the smell of Gore-Tex in the morning...
    One thing is for sure. It smells a lot better than first generation polypro.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  5. #50
    Senior Member hikerbrian's Avatar
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    I was out in fairly chilly temps on Saturday, -8 when we got out of the car in the morning, and -12 when we got back in well after dark. I'm guessing temps were in the -15 range while we were still up high later in the day. I had my iPhone 12 in my pocket, not protected from moisture, and also not really protected from the cold. I was pleased to find that, even though I hadn't fully charged the battery in the morning, it seemed to fully hold its charge through the day (I kept it in airplane mode). This is in contrast to my older iPhone (6s, maybe?), which would not function, no matter how fully charged, once temps dipped to around 0. It was cold enough that I only took my hands out of my gloves/mittens for a max of half a minute or so to take a picture. I also glanced at Gaia to be certain we were at the actual summit at one point. No issues. It was nice to have a big, color screen, to pinch-zoom, and to not have to fiddle with weird menus. I find Gaia to be very intuitive, which is nice because I don't use it much. I hope that does not change. Figured the temp data point might be useful to folks who are wondering how the iPhone functions in colder weather. The only hassle was that it couldn't do face ID when only a narrow eye slit was visible - I had to punch in the numbers.
    Sure. Why not.

  6. #51
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerbrian View Post
    I...wondering how the iPhone functions in colder weather. The only hassle was that it couldn't do face ID when only a narrow eye slit was visible - I had to punch in the numbers.
    I simply unlock mine when using it on a hike. More convenient than thumb print or trying to enter the code.
    A man needs to know his limitations -- Dirty Harry / Clint Eastwood

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    I simply unlock mine when using it on a hike. More convenient than thumb print or trying to enter the code.
    That's all well and good until you pocket dial 911 swimming through spruce somewhere near the summit of SW Twin.

  8. #53
    Senior Member hikerbrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    Just plain rugged,versatile,acccurate and works anywhere anytime in this world.
    Absolutely not trying to talk you out of anything, just one more data point: a close friend recently completed a masters in outdoor leadership from Oregon State. As part of their final project, his cohort planned a 2 week excursion to somewhere way way off the beaten path in Asia. Although navigation was a critical component of the masters program, during the trip not a single person ever pulled out a map. And no one brought a dedicated GPS. They downloaded maps of some kind to their phones in advance of the trip, used Gaia for navigation, and recharged using solar cells and power banks. My friend was a bit disappointed in how much phone use there was, actually (despite considerable training throughout the program in map and compass navigation). To me, this says 1) you can rely on a phone at least as much as you can rely on a dedicated GPS really anywhere; and 2) the 'kids these days' are not being dissuaded from using them as their primary means of navigation, even in some of the more rigorous outdoor leadership training programs (I don't know what NOLS is doing). While map and compass is still a requisite skill, it seems to be the backup plan rather than the primary plan. Interpret all of this how you will. Personally, if I were to go trekking in Africa again, I'd bring my phone rather than my Garmin. But that's just me.
    Sure. Why not.

  9. #54
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    That's all well and good until you pocket dial 911 swimming through spruce somewhere near the summit of SW Twin.
    Thatís why youíre in airplane mode unless you need to make a call. ( My iPhone will not override it even if you dial 911.)
    A man needs to know his limitations -- Dirty Harry / Clint Eastwood

  10. #55
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerbrian View Post
    Personally, if I were to go trekking in Africa again, I'd bring my phone rather than my Garmin. But that's just me.
    That's it in a nutshell. Personally....what works for one individual does not so necessarily work for the next. People's minds work differently and interpret information differently. Comparing the Pros and Cons of Navigation does not make one better than the other. It's the user and the context where the particular tool works best for the individual. IMO redundancy is what matters in a survival situation. When we only had map and compass and no electronics a stick in the sand on a sunny day or which side moss was growing on the side of a tree worked pretty good. Now we still have Map and Compass and some of these electronic gizmo's work really well also. Again having more than one tool in your kit is prudent.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    That’s why you’re in airplane mode unless you need to make a call. ( My iPhone will not override it even if you dial 911.)
    My phone will turn off airplane mode to make emergency calls.

  12. #57
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Here (what I happen to think) is an important tidbit that (I happend to think) gets overlooked. We often see recommendations or lists or "requirements" that people bring

    * Map and compass
    * Ice axe and crampons

    but in reality (I happen to think) most outdoor enthusiasts are not experienced users of these tools and thus they can be a false sense of security or even dangerous.

    Instead of eschewing it, we should embrace it, because that's what "kids these days" are comfortable with and for sure they'll figure out GAIA (or similar) far faster than map + compass. Ice axe and crampons is a different animal altogether.

    My $0.02... IANAL... HYOH... etc

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  13. #58
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    That's all well and good until you pocket dial 911 swimming through spruce somewhere near the summit of SW Twin.
    My swimming moment was several years ago, somewhere on Big Slide in the ADK. Once we got to the highest of the Brothers that had a clear line to a nearby tower, they called me and said they had been trying to reach me and wanted to know what the scope of my emergency was.

    On the Airplane mode thing, as a luddite, the commercials with Apple Watches called for a rescue because they sense the wearer's vitals changing. (he's unconscious after a bike fall) Would that work in airplane mode?
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  14. #59
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    Here (what I happen to think) is an important tidbit that (I happend to think) gets overlooked. We often see recommendations or lists or "requirements" that people bring

    * Map and compass
    * Ice axe and crampons

    but in reality (I happen to think) most outdoor enthusiasts are not experienced users of these tools and thus they can be a false sense of security or even dangerous.

    Instead of eschewing it, we should embrace it, because that's what "kids these days" are comfortable with and for sure they'll figure out GAIA (or similar) far faster than map + compass. Ice axe and crampons is a different animal altogether.

    My $0.02... IANAL... HYOH... etc

    Tim
    I'll agree to a point. IMO it's a matter of attenuation to what you embrace. I embraced and learned how to use an Ice Axe, Crampons and snowshoes for that matter. GPS, Cell phones, and beacons which was also a whole other animal to embrace which I did upon my own volition. You allude to Ice Axe and crampons and not knowing how to use them as being a false sense of security. Well I will say the same of electronic devices even more so. Folks new to the hobby thinking they can get by with a cell phone as a flashlight for instance would be one example. The issue with electronic instruments is they provide a level of stimulation of instant gratification rather than honing a skill over time in a delayed gratification methodology where true outdoor skills are spawned. This is where the attenuation of what you embrace comes into play. Not to say many hours can't be spent learning GPS and cell phones to a high degree. But my intuition is the newbie can easily be lead astray through the use of electronics and therefore creating a false sense of security.
    Last edited by skiguy; 01-19-2022 at 02:13 PM.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  15. #60
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    Reminds me of early in the GPS and cell phone era when someone got caught in the Dry River area. He knew his exact coordinates and reported them on his cell but was totally clueless on where he was and how he needed to head out. My guess is even if he was following breadcrumbs he still would have needed to be hauled out.

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