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Thread: Are gas prices affecting your hiking?

  1. #1
    Senior Member SpencerVT's Avatar
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    Are gas prices affecting your hiking?

    I live in VT just north of the Mass border. Yesterday I drove to Canaan/Lemington Vt to hike what's informally known as Alder Brook Peak, approx 2,500' as well as some other peaks on the VT500 highest list.
    The gas prices in Island Pond Vermont were a full $5.
    I am so glad this wasn't in the period were I was hiking the Maine 3Ks, otherwise I would be filing for bankruptcy!!
    As it is, the trip yesterday cost me $600,000 and I had to sell my kids to afford the gasoline.

    Lately, I have been curtailing some of my weekday driving and expenses so I can save to be able to drive my usual 2-4 hours away on the weekend.
    These gas prices are definitely affecting where I hike and to some extent how much I hike. How about you?
    Spencer
    Bigfoot

  2. #2
    Member JToll's Avatar
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    I did think about it when I put $85 in my tank for the trip back to Rhode Island, but do not plan any changes.
    NH 4K: 48/48, VT 4K: 5/5, NY 4K: 2/46

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    Those trips within 43 round trip miles of my plug in range on my plug in hybrid are really tempting these days. Nice to get home and just plug in to my excess solar to fill the battery backup.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Short answer yes, to stay outdoors, I'm walking more in the neighborhood and there is a 1/4 acre puddle on our street with a few bass in it so I'm fishing again after a few years off. If I am looking for a training trip outside of town. I'll likely do Mt. Tom from the North. From Route 5, it's approx. 11.2 miles RT and if you stay on the NET the whole way, total elevation gain is close to 2,000 feet to climb a 1202 ft. peak.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  5. #5
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    Fewer trips of longer length. At least 3 days in the woods and accessible via rt16 at times of low traffic (slower speed limit, better gas mileage.) I picked the wrong time to buy an older truck.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rhody Seth's Avatar
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    My wife and I are both very fortunate to be able to work fully remote so we don't do much driving as is (I spent 15 years driving two hours a day for work and remember the pain at the pump the last time gas prices skyrocketed). As a result I don't plan to change my driving habits this summer and intend to visit the Whites several times.

  7. #7
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    No but rental car prices are.

    Living in Manhattan I haven't owned a car since 1993. Up until the pandemic it was a lot cheaper to rent a car 10 or 12 times a year, even for a week or two at a time.

    Now a midsize car approaches $200 a day. That's $1000 to camp for a weekend in the Whites or ADKs, before any other expenses. $250 for a day hike like Schunemunk or Timp Torne.

  8. #8
    Senior Member maineguy's Avatar
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    Short answer is no. Before retiring I used to drive (commute) 500 miles a week plus whatever I drove on weekends. Now I do about 500 miles a month.

  9. #9
    Member briarpatch's Avatar
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    I had two options when heading out for a hike. Now real only one when heading out. 1977 Chevy Van with 292 Inline 6 that gets around 12 mpg or Chevy Bolt that travels 250 miles plus on less then $9 on electric. $100 to fill the van for slightly less distance.

    In the winter our distance we can travel in the Bolt does lower to around 150 to 175 miles. But after a winter day of hiking and getting back to the car at dusk with temperatures hovering around zero. It is nice to have nearly instantaneous heat.

    SpencerVT - Now that you have sold the kids. You should have plenty of disposal income to buy a second home in the mountains.

  10. #10
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    “I picked the wrong time to buy an older truck”. If your eyes were open, you would have seen it coming a year and a half ago.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard View Post
    “I picked the wrong time to buy an older truck”. If your eyes were open, you would have seen it coming a year and a half ago.
    The truck was purchased in 2019.

  12. #12
    Senior Member nartreb's Avatar
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    Gas is not high on my list of worries. I no longer commute to work, so my car expenses generally are very low. (Or were, until my car died over the weekend. Bad time to be looking for a replacement. I've been putting it off for months, hoping the pandemic supply chain issues would go away.) My (now defunct) hybrid would get to Franconia Notch and back on one tank of gas, that has roughly doubled in price over the past year or two from $20 to $40, but that's no big deal compared to, say, food and lodging.
    Last edited by nartreb; 05-24-2022 at 11:25 AM.

  13. #13
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshandBaron View Post
    The truck was purchased in 2019.
    Oh, 2019. My bad. That was in the good ol’ days, when the cost of gas was less than $2.00 a gallon!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard View Post
    Oh, 2019. My bad. That was in the good ol’ days, when the cost of gas was less than $2.00 a gallon!
    It was glorious.

  15. #15
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    My hiking hasn't yet been affected by high gas prices because I live in an area that has a good selection of interesting trails and I'm not interested in frequently driving several hours each way to hike. I still head up to the WMNF a few times each year and climb some peaks that I haven't done yet or others that I've done more than once, sometimes with new friends who haven't been there before. I remember living in South Jersey during the 1979 gas shortage and driving 4 hours each way to climb at the Gunks. Although gas prices were lower than today, at least the long lines are gone.

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