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Thread: Hiker Rescue - I think they didnt have a map

  1. #46
    Senior Member JustJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post


    I used a QR Code sign as an example because it could very small and inobtrusive to the overall view versus a giant billboard style sign like JustJoe and others posted. And it could potentially alleviate a constant drain on SAR time and resources. An example where the technology everyone here seems to dread could improve the overall views of the wilderness by not using billboards
    No one here ever mentioned putting up billboards, never mind in wilderness. My suggestion is only to add some additional signage to the 5 problem trail-heads, already covered by the WMNF trail steward program. Those 5 trail-heads, already have a good sized Kiosks. A separate and easily smaller one dedicated to safety and navigation, could be helpful. QR codes could possibly be helpful but it depends on the type. The information you'd like to be able to access with one, would require a Dynamic QR Code and that would require internet service. For just text, and a URL web link to more info., would only need to be a Static QR Code and no internet service is required. However, if you got a URL to a web link such as a map, weather, etc. from it, you will need internet service to open it. Relying on a good internet connection, is not good idea. It is pretty clear, that the US Forest Service and or the NH Fish & Game Dept., do not want hikers to relay on electronics to stay out of trouble.
    Joe

  2. #47
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    Just me, but I think that you guys should stop bickering and knit picking and trying to out do each other !

  3. #48
    Senior Member Cumulus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by briarpatch View Post
    There is a large sign on the Long Trail North that reads, "Long Trail North does NOT return to the day hiking parking lots in Huntington or Duxbury".
    There is, or at least was in 2015, a similar sign in the Belknaps.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #49
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Correct and there are lots more especially around Mt Major.

    And these signs have helped a lot of confused rookies find their way home.
    Last edited by ChrisB; 07-26-2022 at 08:10 AM.
    Don't let your mind write a check your body canít cash

  5. #50
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    I'm not a big believer in signs; many people ignore them. But signs like these do make sense, especially if they are large, simple, and clear.

    I have seen these in other parts of the country as well.

    (Over here in the Adirondacks, we have forests of unmaintained signs with dozens of lines of info in fine print, half of which is incorrect (sign distances are notoriously wrong here). All these signs here accomplish nothing, which is part of the reason I don't believe much in signs.)

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustJoe View Post
    No one here ever mentioned putting up billboards, never mind in wilderness. My suggestion is only to add some additional signage to the 5 problem trail-heads, already covered by the WMNF trail steward program. Those 5 trail-heads, already have a good sized Kiosks. A separate and easily smaller one dedicated to safety and navigation, could be helpful. QR codes could possibly be helpful but it depends on the type. The information you'd like to be able to access with one, would require a Dynamic QR Code and that would require internet service. For just text, and a URL web link to more info., would only need to be a Static QR Code and no internet service is required. However, if you got a URL to a web link such as a map, weather, etc. from it, you will need internet service to open it. Relying on a good internet connection, is not good idea. It is pretty clear, that the US Forest Service and or the NH Fish & Game Dept., do not want hikers to relay on electronics to stay out of trouble.
    Yah so I don't literally mean a billboard. Just exaggerating for effect. I meant a large concentration of signs creating an eyesore on the landscape. And I get the potential tech problems of needing versus not needing internet. Like I said, just thinking out loud and trying to take the point of view of the people getting lost, not our more informed point of view. The way we approach hiking is not the problem...

  7. #52
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    This same thing happened a couple years ago to a group from Mass. I attributed it to being so many signs in Mass, that it becomes 2nd nature to ignore them. That sign on top of Lafayette is pretty damn hard to not see. On a clear day, you can see the hut, so probably on a rainy, misty day, maybe they had their faces down and just motored along.

  8. #53
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    A couple/few Summers ago I had a string of passing 5 "lost" groups early evening on that ridge over the course of 3 trips. More than the total I had previously encountered over several decades! I never regarded them as emergencies, perhaps wrongly treating them too lightly. In one case a person was having bad cramps and even giving them my extra flashlight & batteries was not going to work, so I settled them down sheltered for the night as best possible with my mylar blanket. It seemed I was handing out mylar blankets & headlamps like party favors that Summer. But I admit I continued my own journey without even a twinge of conscience.

    It never even occurred to me to try to contact "rescue" (I did have a cell phone packed away, I'm surprised though to learn there is even service on that ridge) or to abandon my trip to babysit.

    Maybe the weather on this occasion was bad, or there were other mitigating circumstance I missed in my quick read, but WTH? I am not without empathy, but discomfort seems to me a fair price to pay for one's mistake. A Grand Canyon Ranger told me in a conversation a couple of months ago, "people have the right to die." Emergency rescues are for emergencies, not for guaranteeing comfort.

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