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Thread: Are we ruining the earth or ruining the experience?

  1. #31
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    My 2 cents. IM not worried about the earth or the mountains. I feel no guilt when traveling in the mountains, I think LNT is a catch phrase that people adopted to ease their concience. We all impact the mountains when we enter them, I do the best I can not to make that impact any worse then it need be, beyond that I sleep good at night. My belief is that the earth and the mountains are for us to use and enjoy.
    Imagine no herd paths and no trails, yes people certain people would still hike, but to be perfectly honest, Im not a fan of thick brush or bushwacking in the east, although I live for cross-country travel in the Rockies and Sierras. If we didnt create herd paths or trails, yes the mountains would be more pristine, but so what? what good is it if nobody is out there to enjoy it?
    People are oversensitive about this issue, the fact is, the Adirondacks and the Whites are small and the amount of people (which will only increase) that have access to them is overwhelming from a use perspective, you cant make an omelet without breaking some eggs.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Pete_Hickey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by post'r boy
    i'm wondering if anyone has come up with a solution yet??
    No. There is none. Just realize what is happening, so that when it does, you don't say, "What happened?"
    There's no place like 127.0.0.1

  3. #33
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    Thumbs up

    i believe that there will always be wilderness if you look for it. there are plenty of places. try walking to the tip of the ungava pennisula. yes i know there are inuit villages and camps widely spotting the landscape but give it a go you can dodge them and hunt little bunny rabbits and eat spruce needles for sustanance until that vast wilderness swallows you up and spits you out,hopefully back at your home instead of turning into forest duff.
    there are also plenty of places left to get yourself into sufficient trouble to make you think,whew!!! my gosh,i almost died on that trip,but it sure did feel great!!
    p.s. I.M.H.O. the sky is NOT falling!!!!
    Last edited by post'r boy; 10-18-2005 at 05:38 AM.

  4. #34
    Senior Member WhiteMTHike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by forestnome
    I really don't think there is too much traffic on the trails in the White Mountains, however.
    I agree. The first week of this month (October) I was hiking Mt. Potash and Welch/Dickey both the same day. I think I saw 2 or 3 people on Welch/Dickey and I had Potash all to myself. Now granted, this was during the week but we are talking October which is primetime in hiking season.

    Personaly I don't think the amount of traffic on the trails is a problem. I live in a state where people would rather go to the area shopping malls than go on the few (pretty good) hiking trails we have. Hey, works for me, nobody else on the trails.

    What we need to worry about is making sure hiking trails stay hiking trails and we don't lose our wilderness areas. Just my $.01 after taxes.


  5. #35
    Senior Member spaddock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteMTHike
    What we need to worry about is making sure hiking trails stay hiking trails and we don't lose our wilderness areas.
    Exactly. A bulldozer coming in would erode the terrain much faster than hikers would.

    In my hometown we used to have a great area for mountain biking/hiking and cross country skiing and now houses are slowly starting to replace those trails!

    Not that trail erosion isn't a problem, but I personally think mankind is going to destroy the earth via global warming or some kind of nuclear disaster before hiking boots destroy the forest.


    -Shayne

  6. #36
    Senior Member funkyfreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spaddock
    Exactly. A bulldozer coming in would erode the terrain much faster than hikers would..........Not that trail erosion isn't a problem, but I personally think mankind is going to destroy the earth via global warming or some kind of nuclear disaster before hiking boots destroy the forest. -Shayne
    I agree. if we want to talk about destroying the earth and who's responsible.... well I would put the vast majority (at least the ones I know) of mountain climbers and peakbaggers at the bottom of the list. Not that peakbaggers, hikers, etc, shouldn't be mindful of their impact but in my experience they are, at least the people I've hiked with from this newsgroup. I think the gas we use getting to the mountains does more harm than climbing them.

    Now if we wanted to discuss whether the human race is destroying the earth then I would say, yes, undoubtedly - it is in many areas and in many ways. The human species is the most destructive species to have lived on this planet and our numbers are multiplying rapidly as I type this - BUT - here's the rub - human beings are also the most creative species that has lived on this planet so far, so with our great powers come great responsiblities!

    I think it's up to each of us to ask ourselves what kind of world we wish to leave behind us. Do we want to preserve wilderness areas w/o trails, w/o roads, and with viable grizzly bear, mountain lion and other predator populations? Do we want to leave undisturbed the Artic National Wildlife Refuge? Do we want to leave behind undeveloped farmland and undeveloped woods in areas in or close to Boston, NJ, NYC?

  7. #37
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    Trail traffic.

    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteMTHike
    I agree. The first week of this month (October) I was hiking Mt. Potash and Welch/Dickey both the same day. I think I saw 2 or 3 people on Welch/Dickey and I had Potash all to myself. Now granted, this was during the week but we are talking October which is primetime in hiking season.

    Personaly I don't think the amount of traffic on the trails is a problem. I live in a state where people would rather go to the area shopping malls than go on the few (pretty good) hiking trails we have. Hey, works for me, nobody else on the trails.

    What we need to worry about is making sure hiking trails stay hiking trails and we don't lose our wilderness areas. Just my $.01 after taxes.

    I do most of my hiking within a 60 mile radius of New York City! I hike every area, and almost every day! On weekdays, I can hike all day and am lucky to see 2 or 3 other people on the trails! Even on weekends, there are limited areas that draw high traffic!
    Come to think of it, maybe I am wearing out the trails all by myself by hiking every day!!

    Fred

  8. #38
    Senior Member Neil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funkyfreddy

    Now if we wanted to discuss whether the human race is destroying the earth then I would say, yes, undoubtedly
    Nah, no way. All the human race is destroying is its own habitat and the biosphere. The earth will be here, intact, way beyond our extinction.
    Hoping to see you there....

  9. #39
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    Extinction

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil
    Nah, no way. All the human race is destroying is its own habitat and the biosphere. The earth will be here, intact, way beyond our extinction.
    Hoping to see you there....
    I've been told I am already extinct!

    Fred

  10. #40
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    We are changing the earth and the experience, not necessarily ruining the earth and the experience.

    On the hikes that I do (mostly in the Catskills) I see few if any people. It's reassuring for me to see at least a few people on the trail - if I want solitude it can be found easily about 200 yrds off any given trail.

    As far as viewless peaks - I personally think that every peak should have a view. It's our reward for making the effort to climb them. So for those inclined to cut views...cut away. Cutting 3 or 4 trees will not affect the balance of nature.

    If my history serves me correctly, the Catskills were nearly barren 100 years ago. Nature marches on in spite of mankind's intrusions.

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