Pertex Shield Rain Gear

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DayTrip

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Been looking awhile now for a very light weight rain jacket and pants for shoulder seasons/Summer use (like 40 deg F and above weather in "typical" light rain, drizzle and showers - not crazy conditions). I have a pair of Outdoor Research 2-in-1 gloves for many years now that is a fleece glove with Pertex Shield "over glove" shells/covers and they work extremely well. My go to glove on almost all my normal hikes. Add a lot of warmth without making my hands sweat, very waterproof and shells work well on their own. Some companies appear to have been making rain gear out of Pertex (which has many "flavors" now it appears) and it is super light. Only concern is if the performance I get in the gloves translates into a full garment (i.e. breathability but still reasonably waterproof).

Anybody using Pertex rain gear? I believe the Outdoor Research Helium jacket has a Pertex version. I've also seen models from RAB and Marmot. Curious to get feedback on how it performs if anyone owns it. Thanks in advance.
 
When I hike my metabolism keeps me warmer than most other people and I tend to perspire if over dressed. I really like light weight performance garments that breathe well. In winter I'm using a Marmot windshirt over a polypro tee. The outer layer is thin pertex like nylon lined with a very thin fleece. For me it hits that sweet spot for wind protection with breathability and is the perfect balance from 10F to 35F. It is not waterproof at all but a light rain will evaporate off from body heat.

I recently bought a pertex jacket from Mountain Hardware. It lacks the light fleece lining of the Marmot windshirt. It is super light weight and would tear at just the thought of whacking a bush. But it too offers great wind protection with breathablility. That said, if you are looking for a pertex rainlayer I would imaging you will need to have a DWR coating and/or a membraine backing to block the water. I think this will defeat (what I find to be) the best property of the pertex. And I expect the membraine will add weight. All this is a guess and I await the voice of others with field expereince. OP thanks for your inquiry.

On a side note I now use a pair of RAB vapour rise gloves. They are goat skin palms with vapour rize (thin breathable nylon) backing. They are quite nice for 25-35F temps that I often experience. A nice balance of themal and light moisture (snow) protection without overheating. Prior to them I used unprotected liner gloves that offered no snow protection, got wet, and required changing. Adding a mitten shell for snow protection of the liner would result in overheating.
 
When I hike my metabolism keeps me warmer than most other people and I tend to perspire if over dressed. I really like light weight performance garments that breathe well. In winter I'm using a Marmot windshirt over a polypro tee. The outer layer is thin pertex like nylon lined with a very thin fleece. For me it hits that sweet spot for wind protection with breathability and is the perfect balance from 10F to 35F. It is not waterproof at all but a light rain will evaporate off from body heat.

I recently bought a pertex jacket from Mountain Hardware. It lacks the light fleece lining of the Marmot windshirt. It is super light weight and would tear at just the thought of whacking a bush. But it too offers great wind protection with breathablility. That said, if you are looking for a pertex rainlayer I would imaging you will need to have a DWR coating and/or a membraine backing to block the water. I think this will defeat (what I find to be) the best property of the pertex. And I expect the membraine will add weight. All this is a guess and I await the voice of others with field expereince. OP thanks for your inquiry.

On a side note I now use a pair of RAB vapour rise gloves. They are goat skin palms with vapour rize (thin breathable nylon) backing. They are quite nice for 25-35F temps that I often experience. A nice balance of themal and light moisture (snow) protection without overheating. Prior to them I used unprotected liner gloves that offered no snow protection, got wet, and required changing. Adding a mitten shell for snow protection of the liner would result in overheating.
I also own a Marmot Precip jacket with that thin microclime fleece lining. Awesome jacket. Use quite regularly but as you mentioned it doesn't hold up to light rain or worse and can be pretty warm. More of an early/late shoulder season choice for me.

With Pertex there are versions that don't have the membrane backer, which makes it much lighter than other options. I don't believe they have a DWR coating either with this fabric but I don't know that for a fact. I know the gloves I have don't. They also have a "Diamond Weave" technology now which I guess reduces the gaps in the filaments without a backer so it is durable without the need for the backing fabric. I need to read more about it. OR's Helium line is 40% off right now at Backcountry so I want to make a decision while they still have stuff in my sizes.

As far a liner fabric I don't want it to be lined. I really just want it for lightweight shell over a t-shirt or light mid layer when the weather is consistently moist (heavy fog, drizzle, light intermittent rain, etc). I listened to an interesting Backpacking Light podcast last year from a guy who does all sorts of 3rd party membrane testing for waterproof fabrics. He basically said what we all know already: everything gets wetted out eventually and there is no such thing as a breathable waterproof garment. Those two properties are a contradiction and the marketing of these products is highly misleading. When he hikes in heavy rain he uses an ultra light waterproof shell (it was the GoreTex that is ultra light - I forget the brand name) and a hydrophobic shirt/rash much like you would wear for watersports. He feels this is the best combination for staying as dry as possible. I've yet to test this out because I haven't bought either an ultralight rain jacket or a hydrophobic shirt. Both pricey items to buy for a scenario I don't hike in very often.
 
I also own a Marmot Precip jacket with that thin microclime fleece lining. Awesome jacket. Use quite regularly but as you mentioned it doesn't hold up to light rain or worse and can be pretty warm. More of an early/late shoulder season choice for me.
The Marmot windshirt I have is different from the Precip jacket. The widshirt is lightly lined. The Precip is an unlined membraine waterproof breathable.
 
The Marmot windshirt I have is different from the Precip jacket. The widshirt is lightly lined. The Precip is an unlined membraine waterproof breathable.
Yes I have both - the lightly lined and the unlined version. I thought they were both "Precips". No matter. Great products. I don't find the unlined one all that waterproof. Fine for occasional drizzle or a quick shower. I use that one more for the wind than rain.
 
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