Rain Gloves

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DayTrip

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Yesterday I went up and did a cruise in the wind and driving rain on Adams and was reminded of something I've wanted to add to the gear list for quite awhile: some sort of rain gloves. I've tried various things over the years but never been overly happy. I have a pair of OR Versaliner fleece gloves that comes with cool Pertex Shield glove covers that works OK in lighter rain but I wanted something more dedicated to pouring, never ending rain in the 30-50 degree temp range. Awhile back I had come across a "rain mitt" from someone's AT post that was what I had in mind but I can't for the life of me remember who made it. It was a basic, no frills breathable rain proof mitt and fairly inexpensive. Googling this morning trying to identify I found some other interesting ideas, such as an Andrew Skurka recommendation for Showa 281 gloves (which do not seem easy to find) and other products. All I really had to use with me yesterday was the Gore Tex shells of my heavy duty Winter gloves and they soaked right through after about 2 hours. When I got below tree line and took off I actually wringed a substantial amount of water out of them and this morning they're still wet.

What does everyone here use on their hands for those truly cold and rainy days? Don't really want anything insulated. Just a "liner" to slip over bare hands or a liner glove to stay dry and comfortable. My hands get cold extremely easily.
 
You could wear a pair of dishwashing gloves over Smartwool liners. Change the liners when they get wet.
 
https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/product/event-rain-mitts/

Try those. I bought some OR Shukasan mitts, but the sizing was unisex, so the large was too small for my hands. My GF and her tiny hands wear them in shoulder season. Glove liners and those mitts and her hands stay toasty. She bought pacerpoles and now uses neoprene mitts that attach to them.

We hiked Edmands path yesterday to do some redlining and we got to the Col between the peaks and the wind was pretty brutal. First time I had rain blowing up my nose.
 
If just in the rain, you might want to try what cold water paddlers use. I have a couple of different kinds of gloves that work pretty well for race training in colder shoulder seasons. Mits are also available for more protection and warmth. Do a search for "cold water paddling gloves". Most are not great for truly cold frozen ice conditions, but for above freezing temps you should be able to find something that works for you.
 
I have used the REI Minimalist Mitt. They are a Gore-Tex shell with no fleece liner and I have used them alone or with a pair of glove liners. I have also use them on the motorcycle over a pair of leather riding gloves in the rain. On the motorcycle a better shaped and form fitting shell with a longer gauntlet would be nicer but for hiking they works well. Believe they are around $45.

I have considered a rain shell over glove for the motorcycle riding but have not made the purchase. Mitts make braking and shifting a bit more interesting on the motorcycle but warm dry hands are better. Dainese makes a pair for around $45 that I have looked at but I am unsure if they are breathable.
 
Cold rain is one of the most difficult conditions to be out in. My general rule is, if it's doing that, I don't go.

Some of the above suggestions may work for you. I would lean towards the totally impervious rubber or vinyl options. Goretex or other "waterproof" fabrics don't usually hold up long term in hand wear.

Your hands may sweat in the fully waterproof set up, which may require you to keep a slower pace.

Regardless, the best solutions to this problem are to carry multiple (read "several") sets of hand wear, bring chemical heaters, and be ready to hike some of the time with your hands in your pockets, if it's feasible in the terrain.
 
Not "fairly inexpensive", but I use Ourdoor Research Revel mitts. Haven't used them a lot (I don't hike a lot in 30 degree rain) but they definitely do the trick.

Was on the 'cats yesterday and Adams certainly looked spicy from that end.

I have had those OR Mitts on the radar for awhile now. The sticker price has been the only deterrent. Maybe I'll finally pull the trigger next time someone starts emailing % off coupons. :)

Adams was not actually that bad. Summit was 44 deg with 20-25 mph winds. Tedious walking on those wet rocks coming off summit down Airline but not as bad a weather as I had hoped. I did a loop up Short Line > Randolph Path > Gray Knob Trail (which I had never done and was the main point of the hike) > Israel Ridge and then down Gulfside and Valley Way.
 
https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/product/event-rain-mitts/

Try those. I bought some OR Shukasan mitts, but the sizing was unisex, so the large was too small for my hands. My GF and her tiny hands wear them in shoulder season. Glove liners and those mitts and her hands stay toasty. She bought pacerpoles and now uses neoprene mitts that attach to them.

We hiked Edmands path yesterday to do some redlining and we got to the Col between the peaks and the wind was pretty brutal. First time I had rain blowing up my nose.

I think these were the ones I had initially read about! Thanks for jolting my memory. I think the reason I didn't get was the need to seam seal and the ML product video listing one of the requirements being "a lot of patience". I am not that guy....

The highest winds I saw for the day were just above there on Isreal Ridge Path leaving Randolph Path and wrapping around SW corner of Sam Adams. Measured some gusts of 24-25 mph on my Kestrel although I'm pretty sure I got a few pops into the lower 30's when I didn't have my gauge out.
 
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Why go? Why do Adams on a washout? The view of the clouds and wet rocks looks the same on Pierce Moriah and South Carter those days if you need to hike a 4K that day with no or barely any exposure.. Even Madison is about 4/10's of mile out in the open Vs. Adams' near mile from Madison Hut.

That said, for days not expected to be very cold yet very wet and raw is a pair of G-Tex Mitts that I can wear either liners of wind-bloc fleece gloves underneath. I picked mine up at KTP years ago and they worked well on the rare 38 degree rain. I'm getting better at staying home on those days, yet I did go out on a cold June rain on the Tri's when I was wrapping up the NH 4K solo list.
 
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Cold rain is one of the most difficult conditions to be out in.

Absolutely. 2-3 times a year I usually go out intentionally in awful conditions just to stay sharp on managing myself in that kind of weather and make sure if I ever NEEDED to function in that weather I'm experienced at it. I actually enjoy it...every now and then. I do like my sunny day views too.
 
If just in the rain, you might want to try what cold water paddlers use. I have a couple of different kinds of gloves that work pretty well for race training in colder shoulder seasons. Mits are also available for more protection and warmth. Do a search for "cold water paddling gloves". Most are not great for truly cold frozen ice conditions, but for above freezing temps you should be able to find something that works for you.

I hadn't even thought of that. Makes a lot of sense. I'll check it out. Thanks for the idea.
 
Why go? Why do Adams on a washout? The view of the clouds and wet rocks looks the same on Pierce Moriah and South Carter those days if you need to hike a 4K that day. Even Madison is about 4/10's of nile out in the open Vs. Adams' near mile from Madison Hut.

That said, for days not expected to be very cold yet very wet and raw is a pair of G-Tex Mitts that I can wear either liners of wind-bloc fleece gloves underneath. I picked mine up at KTP years ago and they worked well on the rare 38 degree rain. I'm getting better at staying home on those days, yet I did go out on a cold June rain on the Tri's when I was wrapping up the NH 4K solo list.

Uh because it was fun. Route I took involved about 4 miles above tree line. As far as Gore Tex mitts, that is actually what I had and they were an epic fail. To be fair they were my Winter gloves and no doubt have some sort of wind stopping material in the fabric which wetted out. Was like having soaking wet dish towels wrapped around my hands. Didn't really get cold per se with my liner gloves but if it had been mid 30's instead of mid-40's that might have been a different story.
 
Ragged Mountain Equipment makes mitten shells, too. I've looked at them a couple times, but never pulled the trigger. Same deal as the MLD mitts, need to be seam-sealed.
 
Whatever happened to 'hike your own hike' ? :D

Paradox, (who was a dentist), wore rubber gloves as a liner. Being a medical professional, he might have been more used to such than most. I could never do it. My solution is to bring multiple changes of gloves (and other layers).
 
Paradox, (who was a dentist), wore rubber gloves as a liner.

I learned that trick from him and I have used it successfully during the coldest days of winter - more to keep the insulating layer dry and reduce the number of pairs of liners I have to bring with me. Hard to believe he's been gone 2 years :( RIP John!

Tim
 
Whatever happened to 'hike your own hike' ? :D

Paradox, (who was a dentist), wore rubber gloves as a liner. Being a medical professional, he might have been more used to such than most. I could never do it. My solution is to bring multiple changes of gloves (and other layers).

Sometimes when it is really cold I'll use nitrile gloves under a liner glove as a vapor barrier of sorts. Works pretty well. But just by itself I don't find it helpful because cold conducts right through it. Want the reverse situation for the cold rain - something waterproof over a liner that stays dry to provide warmth.

EDIT- Although I suppose if I used a vary large nitrile glove over a liner glove that could work. Something to consider. Durability of those gloves can be problematic though in my opinion. When I've worn alone I frequently tear a hole in the thumb or pointer finger operating zippers or handling other gear, which would compromise the set up in rain.
 
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Sometimes when it is really cold I'll use nitrile gloves under a liner glove as a vapor barrier of sorts. Works pretty well. But just by itself I don't find it helpful because cold conducts right through it. Want the reverse situation for the cold rain - something waterproof over a liner that stays dry to provide warmth.

EDIT- Although I suppose if I used a vary large nitrile glove over a liner glove that could work. Something to consider. Durability of those gloves can be problematic though in my opinion. When I've worn alone I frequently tear a hole in the thumb or pointer finger operating zippers or handling other gear, which would compromise the set up in rain.

You'd have to have tint hands or find nitrile for NBA and NFL Lineman gloves. I wear a pair of XL's when cooking for a volunteer group and they are snug. I'd probably need XXL's or bigger for a liner underneath.
 
I am not a large person but I have to use XL nitrile gloves to fit these racing paddler's size hands and they are barely large enough. I have not tried to wear them under insulating gloves in cold weather , but I have to wonder... anytime I have worn them for First Aid training sessions (indoors or outside in summer), I could pour a cup of sweat out of them within minutes. Terribly uncomfortable. My hands need to breathe.
 
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