Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 47

Thread: bike training

  1. #16
    Senior Member Lawn Sale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Nobleboro, Maine Avatar: Even my shadow hikes!
    Posts
    900
    Quote Originally Posted by kaseri View Post
    Get a fixed gear bike and your legs will become iron.

    I agree. The fixed gear did more for my riding than anything else in the past, including just putting a boatload of mileage on my road bike.
    Appearances are not everything, it just looks like they are.




  2. #17
    Senior Member Stash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Westbrook, ME
    Posts
    736
    Quote Originally Posted by Peakbagr View Post
    In the next couple of years there will be a 9 mile rail trail going in about 1/4 mile from our home. That should be a great assistance.
    Something you may notice about the rail trail, especially on those nice days, is that there are many pedestrians and you become the "car". Be aware of three baby carriages walking abreast.
    Stash

    What matters is what I do. Not what they do.

    Hiking Pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/35709829@N08/

  3. #18
    Poobah Emeritus darren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    S. Dartmouth, MA
    Posts
    1,615
    One of my observations on road / mtn biking:

    I was a road only rider for many, many years. Got to the point where I was pretty good. I then moved to an area that was not bike friendly and stopped road riding for several years. Then I got into mtn biking and loved it. I thought the fun of it blew away road riding. So I did mtb only for several years. Then on a whim I got back out on my road bike and rediscovered the joy of leaning into downhill corners at 40mph. I started doing group rides again and focused on my cadence (I like to hold around 95 rpm). When I got to the point where I could hold 95 rpm for hours straight I got back on my mtn bike and was blown away at how much better my hill climbing was. My overall speed on the mtn bike was a lot faster and I had much better endurance.

    Mtn biking is an awesome workout, but it is a lot of sprints. Which by the way, help my sprinting ability on my road bike. Road biking really helps you build endurance. That is the key to the game if you want to do long rides. My 2 cents, but I would say that you need to get another set of wheels with slicks on them so you can easily switch between road / woods on different days, or just bite the bullet and get a road bike and work on your cadence. I bet you will be glad you did.

    - darren
    Kūlia i ka nuu

  4. #19
    Senior Member jrichard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Hampshire Avatar: night noisemaker
    Posts
    247
    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    Yum. Cyclocross!



    That will get your butt in shape!

    Tim
    Sigh. Like lots of us, I just don't have the cycles (ugh) to get into an organized sport.

    But, the bikes are supposed to be pretty sturdy, for riding over muddy trails, etc... (as the photo implies) and they have the drop bars for road riding. Both those describe my ride to work.


    BTW:I agree with the conventional wisdom that high cadence is the way to go most of the time, to save the knees. But I find that it just doesn't work for me when climbing dirt fire roads. I need to be out of the saddle, using body english with the weight shifted to the rear for traction. I also lower my cadence a bit and get out of the saddle when climbing steep paved roads. This gives me a chance to use some different muscle groups and catch my breath. (IIRC, this is the technique described in Mountain Bike.)

  5. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    near Albany, NY
    Posts
    525

    Thumbs up My 2cents:

    You can never have enough bikes!!!
    Whatever you have just get out and ride.
    It is tough to get injured ON a bike.


    If you are in the Albany area and are free midweek, send me a PM.

  6. #21
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA; Avatar: eggs anyone?
    Posts
    10,690
    Quote Originally Posted by iceNsnow View Post
    It is tough to get injured ON a bike.
    But it is easy to get injured immediately after leaving the bike...

    Doug

  7. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    near Albany, NY
    Posts
    525
    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    But it is easy to get injured immediately after leaving the bike...

    Doug

    Sounds like you know as well!

  8. #23
    Senior Member MonadnockVol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    162

    Street Slicks

    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    First, you can get high-pressure slicks for your MTB which will increase your comfort on the road. ...

    Tim
    Ooohh, you took me back. I had a pair of Kevlar high pressure street slicks for my mountain bike. Because they were Kevlar, they took all kinds of abuse. My buddy and I rode from Albuquerque, NM to Phoenix, AZ. He was using his road bike and I had my mountain bike. There was A LOT of broken glass on the road and he went through four inner tubes and two outer tubes, and I didn't have a single flat over the whole trip. Those tires were amazing.

    Anybody know if anyone still sells Kevlar street slicks?
    My hiking photos

    Map of Mountains I've climbed: Map

    35/35 Catskill 3500

  9. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by MonadnockVol View Post
    Anybody know if anyone still sells Kevlar street slicks?


    click here for link to these tires.

  10. #25
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,605
    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    But it is easy to get injured immediately after leaving the bike...

    Doug
    It's hard to get injured leaving the bike. It's the impact with the ground that does it.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  11. #26
    Senior Member jrichard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Hampshire Avatar: night noisemaker
    Posts
    247
    Quote Originally Posted by iceNsnow View Post
    It is tough to get injured ON a bike.
    Obviously this is a joke, but seriously...

    I can't figure how road bikes don't have more accidents.

    Drivers often turn right (into driveways) after passing me, and I've impacted cars twice while still on the bike. I've actually been incredibly lucky and been able to lean-turn-skid-and-glancing-impact so I haven't been seriously injured. But I sometimes replay those moments trying to decide if staying on the bike was the right move. My speed was relatively low and I could have 1) bailed, or 2) braked straight and taken the chance of t-bone and doing an endo onto the hood. And what would I have done had I been riding a road bike?

    Then there's the endos after being forced off the road (grateful for the helmet). Technically that's "off" the bike though.

    And the roads around here are lined with deep frost heave cracks. I worry about them with 2.5 inch tires!
    Last edited by jrichard; 01-31-2010 at 10:15 PM.

  12. #27
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA; Avatar: eggs anyone?
    Posts
    10,690
    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    But it is easy to get injured immediately after leaving the bike...
    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    It's hard to get injured leaving the bike. It's the impact with the ground that does it.
    The issue isn't leaving the bike--its what happens shortly thereafter as a result... and

    Doug

  13. #28
    Senior Member jniehof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Dover,NH
    Posts
    1,066
    Quote Originally Posted by jrichard View Post
    Drivers often turn right (into driveways) after passing me, and I've impacted cars twice while still on the bike. I've actually been incredibly lucky and been able to lean-turn-skid-and-glancing-impact so I haven't been seriously injured. But I sometimes replay those moments trying to decide if staying on the bike was the right move. My speed was relatively low and I could have 1) bailed, or 2) braked straight and taken the chance of t-bone and doing an endo onto the hood. And what would I have done had I been riding a road bike?
    I'm not sure what sort of difference you're implying with type of bike, but there are two standard ways to manage the "right hook" problem you're talking about: first, riding at least a few feet off the curb improves your visibility. If someone hooks you anyhow, that gives enough space for a quick turn to avoid a collision. John Allen's booklet gives a good intro, but this sort of thing is well-covered in the League of American Bicyclists' classes. (We've not done as good a job as we should in having classes in MA; unfortunately most of us who are into the education are overcommitted on other things, mysel included.)

    I've never had a true right hook problem, but most of my riding is on streets with narrow lanes and on-street parking, so I need a pretty far-out lane position to avoid the doors. I also tend to keep an eye on my mirror and adjust my pace slightly to avoid being at a driveway or intersection at exactly the same time as a motorist is passing me. I've used the quick-turn to avoid a left cross, though.

  14. #29
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA; Avatar: eggs anyone?
    Posts
    10,690
    Quote Originally Posted by jniehof View Post
    I've never had a true right hook problem,
    I've been right hooked into a McD's parking lot. I managed to out-turn the car, go around the McD's and out the other entrance. My friends only knew that I had dropped back a bit...

    Doug

  15. #30
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,845
    A friend was "left hooked" last year. She was coming down a long hill on a straight, well paved road, in daylight. The driver coming the other way turned left directly into her path. My friend was going fairly fast, but she was lucky to be able to brake, and then lay the bike down, and come away with minor abrasions.

    I haven't been hooked, but I've been doored. Guy opened the door on his car without even looking. I was able to shed most of the spped, but he was pretty surprised when my front wheel slammed to a stop right next to him against the door hinge. I was lucky not to get hurt. I always watch for heads in cars.

    TCD

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •