Missing Hiker - Mt Washington Area

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Please pass this message along to any fellow hikers who may be in the area. Although the organized search has concluded, NH F&G is soliciting the public's continued help.
 
Prayers and good thoughts for Peter and his family for a good ending to this worrisome time.

Also prayers of thanks, and many prayers for peace of mind, go out for those who have been searching and are now standing down.

Its a hard thing to be called off/ stood down. Gruff talk, no talk, just the facts jack, stiff lip, " ask Doug"... doesn't change the fact that the SAR participants themselves have no personal closure when things go this way.

So here is a big internet thanks to all who volunteer , serve, turn out, and offer up your time, talent, and passion when someone else may have had a REALLY bad day.

Breeze
 
Thanks Breeze. Very much appreciated.

Though we aren't listed in the F&G reports, Upper Valley Wilderness Response Team fielded as usual with NEK-9. I didn't get to go on this one, but my thoughts are very much with everyone up there.

A nice video showing Mark and Abel with his UVWRT field assistant, Chester Fox: http://www.wmur.com/video/19782183/index.html
 
Sad day for the hiking community. My thoughts and prayers to Mr. Shintani's family. I also salute all of those who participated in the search mission.
 
Had a phone conversation today with a White Mountain local, who offered these bits of hear-say:

The hiker in question, "Peter Shintani, age 70, of Napanee, Ontario," (copied from above) had apparently attempted Washington previously, unsuccessfully, and that this hike represented a redoubled second effort.

He seems not to have turned up anywhere else, nor do any evidence trails lead away from Pinkham Notch, which may lead one to deduce that he meant to hike, not disappear.

He was apparently a member of a church in his home town, which might lead one to conclude that he was a valued participant in his community and that there would be family, friends and neighbors who would take an interest in his absence.

My local friend has contacts in the SAR community, and opined that the likeliest scenario under current discussion includes a probable actual accident at this point, that the guy is still out there somewhere.

My heart goes out to all who are impacted, it seems a real tragedy has likely taken place somewhere on the mountain.

Has no one any further hard information? The case still seems open, and getting more stale every day.

Thanks,

--Mike.
 
Some of Mr. Shintani's family visited the Pinkham Notch area yesterday ( 6/20) guided and briefed by NHFG, for a better understanding of the area where Peter went missing.

I'm not aware of any "newer" hard/on the ground information. NHFG, NHSP, and USFS are still open to public information/input and will mount a response in keeping with any new information.

Breeze
 
It is too bad he didnt sign the book or leave a note in his car. I will always sign the book or leave a note. I wonder if he got lost, if so on that side of Washington, (Tuckers) which trail if you took and went off trail would be bad news?
 
Some of Mr. Shintani's family visited the Pinkham Notch area yesterday ( 6/20) guided and briefed by NHFG, for a better understanding of the area where Peter went missing.

I'm not aware of any "newer" hard/on the ground information. NHFG, NHSP, and USFS are still open to public information/input and will mount a response in keeping with any new information.

Breeze

Thank you.
 
The article portrays him as a sensible, seasoned hiker. It does not seem that he would have taken undue risks. The hypothesis that he may have fallen into some very obscure crevasse is very plausible.

It reminds me that when I hike alone, I need to not wander too much, stick to my plan and not take undue chances, like getting too close to the cliffs. I turn back a lot more when I'm hiking solo. It sounds like Peter would have too, so it more than likely must have been an accident.

In the Mt. Marcy area of the ADKS many years ago I saw several missing person signs at the trailheads and huts. The hypothesis was they wandered off trail and plunged into sinkholes, being buried by leaves and detritus as they plunged, never to be found. Very sad.

I am becoming more and more persuaded to carry an airhorn with me when I hike solo, when things like radios, whistles and phones become useless. It was a tip I learned once from a hunter who used it as a defense against a big-critter attack.
 
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It is too bad he didnt sign the book or leave a note in his car. I will always sign the book or leave a note. I wonder if he got lost, if so on that side of Washington, (Tuckers) which trail if you took and went off trail would be bad news?
According to the article, he did leave a logbook entry in the car. However, the note did not discuss his plan for that day.

I have always been discouraged from leaving a visible note on the car saying "gone for help" or "be back in 4 hours" or similar. The thought is that it will encourage break-ins. What I have learned from this, is that it's important to leave a note in the car, accessible but not visible from the outside with my plans. That way, if I'm missing, the authorities get into my car looking for clues they will find the note. I usually just tell my wife where I'll be, and usually leave a note with her with the specifics, I guess that works too.
 
Has there been any discussion of a mass hike/bushwhack in the area to try to locate him ? Must be horrible for the family. A teenager drowned here last week in the Housatonic near Falls Village and they haven't found him yet. I'm having nightmares about it, can't imagine what it's like for the family.
 
Has there been any discussion of a mass hike/bushwhack in the area to try to locate him ?

SAR was all over the place at the beginning to middle of last week, both on foot and in the air. While I don't know if they did any bushwhacking, they certainly working to cover a tremendous amount of terrain.
 
Received this note from Peter Shintani's niece:

I have been reading the 'View from the Top' blog ever since my uncle, Peter Shintani went missing. His disappearance has greatly sadden our large extended family and I want to thank the volunteers who participated in the search effort. No words can explain how thankful we are that such a large and dedicated group of people took time to search for our family member. He leaves behind three children, two grandchildren, three sisters, and a very close knit community.
 
I also got this email and thought I should post it here:

On Tuesday, June 16, 2009 at approximately 1330, I had just completed the switchback section of the Tuckerman's Ravine Trail headed west towards Hermit Lake Shelter and I encountered an older, Asian man headed east towards Pinkham Notch Visitor Center. As we passed each other I greeted him and he only responded with a low grunt. This wasn't at all that strange in itself, I immediately figured that he didn't speak English but the reason I remember this person so clearly is because at the time I remember being surprised that he had no equipment at all. No backpack, no water bottle, nothing. When I reached the summit of Mount Washington on June 17th, the next day, I saw the picture of the missing hiker and immediately reported to the Ranger desk all the information I had about the man I crossed paths with. I gave them a complete description including time of day, location, what the man was wearing, etc, and I even spoke with Lt. Gralenski of the NH Fish and Game over the phone, after they determined, with much questioning, that my account was consistent and true. He was very interested in the information I had but I felt he doubted it was Peter Shintani because his vehicle was still in the Pinkham Notch Visitor Centers parking lot and they were concentrating their search efforts much higher up on the mountain. I must tell you that I have had much training in information gathering as I am an ex-Army Paratrooper and am very aware of my surroundings, time, location and situations and people that seem strange at all times. I am wise enough to say that I can't 100% say that the man I encountered was definitely Mr. Shintani but I feel that not enough attention has been given to this information. Anyways, I hope this information will be helpful to your forum. Feel free to contact me with any questions you might have or possibly refer me to the forum. Thanks and have a great day.

I have his name and email address if anyone needs to contact him they can email me.

- darren
 
I also got this email and thought I should post it here:



I have his name and email address if anyone needs to contact him they can email me.

- darren

Darren, is he refering to the switchbacks above crystal cascades? Or something higher up on the mountain?

That would truly make it even more odd because it puts Mr Shintani, if its him, headed in the correct direction very close to the PNVC.

Keith
 
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