Traction repair

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sierra

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I carry Zip-Ties to repair my traction devices. I recently read in a forum, that they actually do not work well and will break quite easily. They recommended wire. I took a bad fall last year and broke 3 ribs, so traction is really important to me. I went to Home Depot and they had braided wire, but I couldn't see how this could be used in the field to repair spikes? Any chance this topic was posted in this group? I sure would like the specifics on this field repair. The last few months have been boney as Hell out there, I can't believe my Hillshounds have held up so well.
 
I carry Zip-Ties to repair my traction devices. I recently read in a forum, that they actually do not work well and will break quite easily. They recommended wire. I took a bad fall last year and broke 3 ribs, so traction is really important to me. I went to Home Depot and they had braided wire, but I couldn't see how this could be used in the field to repair spikes? Any chance this topic was posted in this group? I sure would like the specifics on this field repair. The last few months have been boney as Hell out there, I can't believe my Hillshounds have held up so well.
Just doing a quick search I found one guy’s repair kit. He is still carrying zip ties but also .9 mm aluminum wire. Basically the wire should be thick and strong enough but not too much so as it can’t be bent back on itself. A thinner line looped double/tripled/ quadrupled backed is easier to deal with than just a single thicker strand. But not so thin that it is difficult to work with in cold with gloves on. I’m sure others here have a plethora of suggestions. https://www.snowshoemag.com/snowshoeing-education-307-the-homemade-snowshoe-repair-kit/
 
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Zip ties worked for my friend's microspikes in a pinch but yeah they didn't last long. He had to switch 'em out every hour or two. A leatherman with plyers works well as sometimes you can just bend things back into place using them. Last trip my buddy used some paracord which did the trick for a while. But yeah, carrying some fine wire would work well if you wrap it a few times.
 
12ga copper wire with the insulation on.
 
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May be easier to just carry another (single or pair) Microspike than to attempt a field repair. Hopefully snowshoe season will start at the end of the week and render them useless until next fall.
 
May be easier to just carry another (single or pair) Microspike than to attempt a field repair. Hopefully snowshoe season will start at the end of the week and render them useless until next fall.

I agree, looking forward to getting on snowshoes.
 
May be easier to just carry another (single or pair) Microspike than to attempt a field repair. Hopefully snowshoe season will start at the end of the week and render them useless until next fall.
……and keep your fingers crossed your snowshoes don’t break.
 
Solar installers that are in it for the long haul use them in place of plastic zip ties in areas where they are exposed to the sun. The standard plastic zip ties can get degraded by sunlight and in several years they can get brittle and snap, the stainless versions do not.
 
These steel zip ties look like a great item but I am curious about use in the field. Most of the product videos I see for it use a tool to tighten securely and then cut edge off. How is this being accomplished in the field? Is a multi tool sufficient?
 
I have found the multitool cutters to be better than nothing. Depending on the gauge of the strap, it will probably dent it and then you may have to fatigue fracture it by bending it back and forth. Obviously experiment at home before doing a field repair. In most case the end can be wrapped or tucked out of the way to avoid cutting it.
 
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