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Thread: Winter gear list critique

  1. #16
    Senior Member HAMTERO's Avatar
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    Do you need the Coal and a down jacket? What about swapping the down jacket for some primaloft pants and some down booties or a half bag? Maybe a cheap bivi bag?
    I assume i'm going to keep walking unless I break my leg, pelvis, ect and then I don't think i'll be able to move around enough to keep a fire going.
    "I'm on a permanent vacation"

    Don Sheldon

  2. #17
    Senior Member NewHampshire's Avatar
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    I am thinking of buying a Therma-Lite emergency bivy sack and an Emergency tube tent (its not perfect, but I figure it could be the basis for a good snow shelter at least.)

    Any comments on those items?

    I also carry two headlamps. A ZenixIQ (seems like everyone loves them ) and an Energizer LED I got at Wally world (thanks to Arghmans suggestion in another thread!) 2 Compasses as well. Got the GPS, but that I consider a toy....compasses and maps don't run out of battery power . I also have a mini survival kit with all kinds of simple things that might be handy in dire conditions.

    Brian
    Adopter: Wildcat Ridge Trail from Rt.16 to Wildcat "D". If you have any issues please contact me!

  3. #18
    Senior Member onestep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAMTERO
    Do you need the Coal and a down jacket? What about swapping the down jacket for some primaloft pants and some down booties or a half bag? Maybe a cheap bivi bag?
    I use the Coal jacket during rest stops. I've never used the down jacket! I guess it's my security blanket but I like your options to take it's place.


    Quote Originally Posted by HAMTERO
    I assume i'm going to keep walking unless I break my leg, pelvis, ect and then I don't think i'll be able to move around enough to keep a fire going.
    I feel the same way. I'm not even sure I could get inside a bivy bag if I broke a leg, let alone gather wood and build a fire...but you never know!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P.
    I may have missed it but I don't see an insulation layer for your bottom, just the base & shell. Again if you can't move or moving is really slow, they would be nice to have.
    I use to carry a pair of heavy fleece pants, but, I never used them. So far as long as I keep rest stops short my legs keep warm enough with the mid weight base layer & shell pants. Last week in the ADK's it was -10 to start and warmed up to +5. I wore my midweight layer over a light weight layer plus shell pants. I was almost too warm.

  4. #19
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    You have enough if you keep moving, what if you can't move? Seems there is two camps with several options within the two.

    1.) pack sleeping bag & bivy (or more) so if you get cold, you stop & set up camp.

    2.) You pack extra warm clothes so if you have to slow down, or stop you layer up, (because you or a party member sprains an ankle making quick travel impossible or if you have to stop, you stuff extra clothes in a bivy sack or ER blanket taped closed (or wear the clothing inside)

    I prefer option two because IMO, most injuries that occur are minor & just involve twists, cuts, trip & falls with bruises, maybe a sprain. These cause the travel time to increase & add some minor discomfort (along with overly ambitious planning or slightly underestimating conditions, most people don't jump in way over their head, just slightly - in winter that might be enough) The injuries & route finding error we hear about are more severe. For instance had the Lafayette climber gone down Garfield Ridge to Skookumchuck & decided opps, I messed up, I'll go down here, this likely would have been a non-rescue/issue

    You should have enough gear to survive a night outside if necessary, not that you are planning on it. (In theory I guess we could all sleep - or stay out in our yards tonigth to test our gear, I admit I haven't done that but I believe I have enough for that. The Bivy sack I have is the Terma Lite one mentioned above.) In summer an outer shell layer may be enough, maybe a fleece also for an uncomfortable but safe night out.

    Do you think you have enough to last a night out faily immobile at 10 degrees? How about -10? Can you convince your wife/SO/Mom that you do?
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  5. #20
    Senior Member spencer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onestep

    Pack – 3000ci (Gregory Z)

    Crampons (Grivel G10)

    Hiking poles (Black Diamond Flic-loc’s)
    You bushwhack with a Z and haven't shredded it yet? Isn't that the sil-nylon one? I like the idea of the pack but never got too interested b/c I need something that stands up to the thrashing that you know well. Does it really stand up to the abuse?

    I find poles to be horrendous while bushwhacking. I rarely find I want them and when you stow them they end up getting caught on everything imaginable.

    I can't recall ever wanting crampons while bushwhacking but I suppose if you don't ever want to have to adjust your kit based on terrain then you need to include them.

    I like carrying double maps, too. I haven't lost one yet but when I do...

    The sense of adventure is the most important thing to carry! The less you carry, the more you need it...

    Otherwise, it looks pretty good to me.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by spencer

    I find poles to be horrendous while bushwhacking. I rarely find I want them and when you stow them they end up getting caught on everything imaginable.
    Spencer, at your age I never used them either, but in my advanced dotage I use one all the time, it's worth the aggravation for me. Like everything else, it's a tradeoff.

  7. #22
    Senior Member onestep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spencer
    You bushwhack with a Z and haven't shredded it yet? Isn't that the sil-nylon one? I like the idea of the pack but never got too interested b/c I need something that stands up to the thrashing that you know well. Does it really stand up to the abuse?
    I believe their G pack is the sil-nylon one. The Z version is made of a tougher material. I’ve used mine since summer, on probably 40 ‘whacks, without issue. YMMV.

    Quote Originally Posted by spencer
    I find poles to be horrendous while bushwhacking. I rarely find I want them and when you stow them they end up getting caught on everything imaginable.
    I only use poles in the winter. Two for trailed peaks, only one for bushwhackin’
    Quote Originally Posted by spencer
    I can't recall ever wanting crampons while bushwhacking but I suppose if you don't ever want to have to adjust your kit based on terrain then you need to include them.
    I leave the house with crampons and snowshoes strapped to my pack. I’ll leave either one in the trunk (shhhhhhhhh don’t tell anyone) if I don't think I'll need them.
    Quote Originally Posted by spencer
    The sense of adventure is the most important thing to carry! The less you carry, the more you need it...
    Three life essentials… Map, compass, and a sense of adventure!

    Onestep
    Last edited by onestep; 01-30-2007 at 10:38 AM.

  8. #23
    Senior Member DrJJFate's Avatar
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    Great thread so far. My list is much the same as mentioned above.

    Does anyone carry rope or cord? I have about 40m of 3mm cord that I carry when I go above treeline in the case that visibility is bad to nonexistant.

  9. #24
    Senior Member dug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbreen
    For the snowshoe repair kit, I carry five plastic zip ties (about 12 inches long) that I believe I read about here.
    Jim
    Second the Zip ties, too!!! Forgot about them. Go with the white ones. The black ones are often too brittle and stand a better chance of breaking when it's cold.

  10. #25
    Senior Member spencer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onestep
    I believe their G pack is the sil-nylon one. The Z version is made of a tougher material.
    right on. thanks for correcting me.
    yes, zip ties are great to have in the fix-it-bag.

    spencer

  11. #26
    Senior Member hikerfast's Avatar
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    rope

    I keep 50 feet of nylon cord in the pack. might need a splint, repair gear. one time my pack frame broke and i used it, what a relief that was. one thing i have found real handy was this roll of about 5 feet of velcro I got at EMS. you can cut off the size you need. i found this perfect for attached things to my pack, etc. the roll is tiny and hardly weighs a thing. its nice to cut off the exact size i want.

  12. #27
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    comments....and reasons

    Here are some of the differences, tough there are more similarities in my equipment.

    Add:
    2 contractor grade 33 gal plastic bags. One as a sack and the other as a poncho. Excellent waterproofness for an emergency bivy and I will not hesitate in giving them away to an injured or hypothermic hiker unlike my good gear.

    little stuff: sunglasses, sunscreen chapstick, shoe lace, 2 pieces of 4mm x 15 ft climbing utility cord (rated to 400lbs), pencil (to sign in those pencilless canisters), dental floss and pre-threaded needle, extra needels, extra batteries instead of headlamp (though I respect your decision here), LED pinch light, rain cover, 2 sets handwarmers, small stub candle (excellent for morale when things go really bad.)

    I've used the cord to build a litter and evac a hiker with a broken leg.
    I've used the floss to sew up 2 peoples pants - one split the seam for the full length of the leg, the other had a side zip blow out. Also sewed a pack strap back onto the pack. That's a story.
    I've recently stopped carrying the rain cover on colder hikes.
    I also carry LLBean primaloft pants with full side zips.
    Definitely redundant maps on a whack, at least 3 if I'm solo.
    I also have my wallet, keys, and usually my cell phone so it doesn't get stolen from the car.

    A litttle story about having 2 compasses. When you bushwhack alone, it could be life or death to have a back-up as they can get lost. I've seen the center part come out of the baseplate. Look down and there's no compass in your compass. On a remote 3ker in the dacks a quick survey of Sue Eilers, Dennis Crispo, and myself uncovered the fact that we had 7 compasses and 4 altimeters between us. We were all in the habit of bushwhacking solo.

    Lastly, I'm guessing you might be over prepared on the handwear. Of course this is difficult to tell because everyone has different hand characteristics. I'd survey how many times all the gloves and mits are used.

    I usually start with one set of Mechanic's gloves to wear alone as these replaced my habit of hiking in just liners because they are more durable. When these get wet I have a second pair. Then I have a pair of Smartwool gloves (a little thicker than polypro liners) that I wear with mitten shells. I'll use these instead or after the first pair on mechanics gloves when it's colder or wetter. Then I have the really thick double fleece lined mitten shells. These are my back-up for when all else fails. I go to the back-up about 5% of the time and this is usually when everthing else is wet. It's a good ballance. I don't carry too much unused gear.

    Lastly, I carry my zipties by weaving them through the lacing on my sherpas. That way I never carry my snowshoe repair material when I don't hve my snowshoes.
    Last edited by John H Swanson; 02-02-2007 at 06:12 AM.
    "I've been kicked by the wind, robbed by the sleet, had my head snowed in, and I'm still on my feet, and I'm still,...willin"

  13. #28
    Senior Member onestep's Avatar
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    Thanks John, lots of food for thought in your post. Lot’s of food for thought from everyone in this thread!

    Quote Originally Posted by John H Swanson
    A litttle story about having 2 compasses.
    Back in my pre-3k days I was ‘whackin PATN with Papa Bear. After an especially thick spruce-push I looked at my compass to verify direction of travel only to see an empty base plate. The compass part of my compass was gone! I showed it to Papa Bear who then asked “where’s your backup?” My reply was “you”. Since then I’ve carried 2 compasses. Maybe I’ll be proactive and stow away an additional map, too.

    Onestep

  14. #29
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    Vapor barrier for hands

    I sweat a lot going up, including my hands, and have found that my gloves get wet from the inside. I carry, and sometimes use, vinyl or latex medical-type gloves as a vapor barrier. They keep the glove insulation dry and my hands warmer. When you take them off, my hands are wet, so I look for a wind-protected spot so I can dry my hands before they ice up.

    If I were stuck out late or overmnight, I think they would be a big plus under glove liners and mittens.
    Dennis

  15. #30
    Senior Member Mad Townie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dclynch
    I carry, and sometimes use, vinyl or latex medical-type gloves as a vapor barrier. They keep the glove insulation dry and my hands warmer. When you take them off, my hands are wet, so I look for a wind-protected spot so I can dry my hands before they ice up.
    Did that once, years ago. Soaked my sleeves with sweat from wrists to elbows. That was the end of VB gloves for me.
    Mad Townie

    Take long walks in stormy weather or through deep snows in the fields and woods, if you would keep your spirits up. Deal with brute nature. Be cold and hungry and weary. - H. D. Thoreau

    Easy trails, nice days and comfort are good, too. - M. Townie

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