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Thread: Rain Gloves

  1. #16
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    Paradox, (who was a dentist), wore rubber gloves as a liner.
    I learned that trick from him and I have used it successfully during the coldest days of winter - more to keep the insulating layer dry and reduce the number of pairs of liners I have to bring with me. Hard to believe he's been gone 2 years RIP John!

    Tim
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  2. #17
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    Whatever happened to 'hike your own hike' ?

    Paradox, (who was a dentist), wore rubber gloves as a liner. Being a medical professional, he might have been more used to such than most. I could never do it. My solution is to bring multiple changes of gloves (and other layers).
    Sometimes when it is really cold I'll use nitrile gloves under a liner glove as a vapor barrier of sorts. Works pretty well. But just by itself I don't find it helpful because cold conducts right through it. Want the reverse situation for the cold rain - something waterproof over a liner that stays dry to provide warmth.

    EDIT- Although I suppose if I used a vary large nitrile glove over a liner glove that could work. Something to consider. Durability of those gloves can be problematic though in my opinion. When I've worn alone I frequently tear a hole in the thumb or pointer finger operating zippers or handling other gear, which would compromise the set up in rain.
    Last edited by DayTrip; 10-26-2020 at 03:09 PM.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  3. #18
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    Sometimes when it is really cold I'll use nitrile gloves under a liner glove as a vapor barrier of sorts. Works pretty well. But just by itself I don't find it helpful because cold conducts right through it. Want the reverse situation for the cold rain - something waterproof over a liner that stays dry to provide warmth.

    EDIT- Although I suppose if I used a vary large nitrile glove over a liner glove that could work. Something to consider. Durability of those gloves can be problematic though in my opinion. When I've worn alone I frequently tear a hole in the thumb or pointer finger operating zippers or handling other gear, which would compromise the set up in rain.
    You'd have to have tint hands or find nitrile for NBA and NFL Lineman gloves. I wear a pair of XL's when cooking for a volunteer group and they are snug. I'd probably need XXL's or bigger for a liner underneath.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  4. #19
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    I am not a large person but I have to use XL nitrile gloves to fit these racing paddler's size hands and they are barely large enough. I have not tried to wear them under insulating gloves in cold weather , but I have to wonder... anytime I have worn them for First Aid training sessions (indoors or outside in summer), I could pour a cup of sweat out of them within minutes. Terribly uncomfortable. My hands need to breathe.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

  5. #20
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessmuk View Post
    I could pour a cup of sweat out of them within minutes.
    Yeah, me too, but I put up with it when it's super cold out as it saves glove liners.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  6. #21
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    Paddlers use gloves that have a rubber gasket which touches the rubber gasket of a dry or semi-dry suit. Latex needs to touch latex to seal water out....latex on skin will leak and the only way to get good results is to use alot of it or make as tight as possible---like a neck gasket

    I use nitriles in the winter to get the same effects as a vapor barrier liner. But of course if you are putting weight on poles and squeezing the grips, they will flood out much sooner.....
    Last edited by Remix; 10-26-2020 at 07:14 PM.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remix View Post
    Paddlers use gloves that have a rubber gasket which touches the rubber gasket of a dry or semi-dry suit. Latex needs to touch latex to seal water out....latex on skin will leak and the only way to get good results is to use alot of it or make as tight as possible---like a neck gasket
    I think the OP was asking about keeping warm hands in rain, not complete submersion under water. I have a couple of different types of gloves for paddling that keep my hands warm enough while paddling in colder, but still above freezing conditions. As a canoe paddler, my hands are never completely submerged while paddling, especially not all the way to the wrists. No need for a dry suit type gasket for protective warmth or to keep my hands working comfortably.
    Last edited by Nessmuk; 10-26-2020 at 08:59 PM.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

  8. #23
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessmuk View Post
    I think the OP was asking about keeping warm hands in rain, not complete submersion under water. I have a couple of different types of gloves for paddling that keep my hands warm enough while paddling in colder, but still above freezing conditions. As a canoe paddler, my hands are never completely submerged while paddling, especially not all the way to the wrists. No need for a dry suit type gasket for protective warmth or to keep my hands working comfortably.
    I went ahead and ordered a pair of paddling gloves to try. They seem like they're what I'm looking for and in the product videos I watched it appears you have pretty good dexterity with them to operate zippers and other misc tasks so they hopefully won't need to actually come off too often, which would be a plus.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  9. #24
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessmuk View Post
    If just in the rain, you might want to try what cold water paddlers use. I have a couple of different kinds of gloves that work pretty well for race training in colder shoulder seasons. Mits are also available for more protection and warmth. Do a search for "cold water paddling gloves". Most are not great for truly cold frozen ice conditions, but for above freezing temps you should be able to find something that works for you.
    Just as a follow up to this idea, I wound up ordering a pair of NRS Catalyst gloves. I went out today for about a 35 minute walk (47 deg F; steady but not overly heavy rain; no wind) and have to say I'm thinking this was an awesome suggestion. Hands were very comfortable even though I was walking pretty slowly so I wasn't heating up like I would hiking. Totally dry. I was even pleasantly surprised that I was actually able to operate my phone with the gloves. I assumed that was not going to be an option. It was also fairly easy to use the zippers on my jacket pockets, use the unlock button on my keychain, etc. Seem reasonably functional which is a huge plus. There is also enough room with the size I got that I'll be able to get a thin liner glove inside and also the Pertex liners I have for my OR 2 in 1 gloves appear to fit over them, which would make them warmer and even more impervious to truly foul weather.

    On the downside, the major issue is that when they get wet they definitely stay wet. They've been hanging on the coat hooks in my entry for about an hour now and they're still very damp. In my case that probably won't matter because they'll generally be for day hikes so when I'm done I'm just flinging them in my trunk, not trying to figure out how to dry them in a tent on a cold, damp night. The fit is also a bit off. The overall length is perfect for my hands and correlated perfectly with their size chart. The pinky finger however is a bit long and when I clench my hand I get a fold at the base of the palm there and about 1/2 inch of space opens up over my pinky. The size chart matched my hand circumference perfectly here too but they definitely appear to run big in that way. The model I went with was only 2mm neoprene and the fingers are "pre bent" so not sure if that was a factor or if this is just normal for this kind of glove. The heavier waterproof and insulated gloves were all at least 3mm neoprene. NRS was a company that seemed to come up repeatedly in "best paddle gloves" searches so I'm assuming it is one of the better brands for water sports but I have no idea on that either.

    Looking forward to trying them out in colder, wetter weather but I think these are going to be perfect for what I was looking for. Thanks for providing an alternative perspective on my question. That's why I love this forum. Recommendations received here always seem to be spot on.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  10. #25
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Boot / Glove Dryer is an awesome gear addition to any outdoor enthusiast's mud room

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  11. #26
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    Boot / Glove Dryer is an awesome gear addition to any outdoor enthusiast's mud room

    Tim
    I own one. Is it OK with neoprene? I know it is a pretty mellow heat but the articles I read on neoprene went out of there way to say avoid drying it because it will degrade quickly. Didn't want to push my luck.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  12. #27
    Senior Member Nessmuk's Avatar
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    During a recent swift water rescue training I did over a 4 day period, students were given a kind of NRS water rescue gloves (rubbery but not fully neoprene) that went with the drysuits we were given to wear. I took my soggy gloves home each night and they dried pretty well opened up on a mitten dryer without heat. Those students who left them at the facility had them and our drysuit insides dried by the staff using a kind of blow dryer octopus looking contraption, also without heat I believe.
    "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

  13. #28
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessmuk View Post
    During a recent swift water rescue training I did over a 4 day period, students were given a kind of NRS water rescue gloves (rubbery but not fully neoprene) that went with the drysuits we were given to wear. I took my soggy gloves home each night and they dried pretty well opened up on a mitten dryer without heat. Those students who left them at the facility had them and our drysuit insides dried by the staff using a kind of blow dryer octopus looking contraption, also without heat I believe.
    I left them on coat hooks overnight and they are perfectly dry. So I should be fine. Thanks again for the tip. I think I am going to order their neoprene cap/hat to try as well. It is fairly inexpensive and based on how well the gloves work it may be a good addition. I have an OR Gore Tex cap I usually wear in rainy weather but it only has a light fleece liner so when it gets wet the cold conduction tends to make me cold. I'm actually looking forward to going for a hike in pouring rain to try all this stuff out and dial my system in.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 48/48; ME 4k: 2/14; VT 4k: 1/5; ADK 46: 6/46; Cat 3.5k 10/35

  14. #29
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    I own one. Is it OK with neoprene? I know it is a pretty mellow heat but the articles I read on neoprene went out of there way to say avoid drying it because it will degrade quickly. Didn't want to push my luck.
    The dryer I have (PEET) is almost hard to tell if it's working or not, the heat is so low.
    Tom Rankin
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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    I own one. Is it OK with neoprene? I know it is a pretty mellow heat but the articles I read on neoprene went out of there way to say avoid drying it because it will degrade quickly. Didn't want to push my luck.
    I cycle down to 40f or so F rain with a pair of neoprene cycling rain gloves. They come in various thicknesses, and considering there is always a 15-30mph headwind I feel they work well. That being said I am normally working pretty hard on purpose to keep warm, and am not out in such weather more than a few hours.

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