Mt. Tremont

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sierra

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Me and My dog made our third ascent of this fine peak. Trail is in excellent condition, muddy in the middle area, but that is normal there and it's not a big deal. Completely snow free, not much debris on the trail at all. Still blazed quite well. I am curious why on some peaks, like Tremont there are two Benchmarks on the summit?
 
One is the primary benchmark and the second (and sometimes third) is a reference. If you look at them the reference will have an arrow stamped on it pointing to the primary benchmark.
 
Tremont gets a bad rap by some but I enjoy it. Been up there 10 times, mostly during my time as volunteer adopter for Mt. Tremont Trail. That's a bear of a route to maintain. 😂
 
One is the primary benchmark and the second (and sometimes third) is a reference. If you look at them the reference will have an arrow stamped on it pointing to the primary benchmark.
Forgive my stupidity (which you've been doing patiently for many years now :) ) but why is that necessary? Aren't those reference markers usually set in stone and pretty indestructable? Curious why two or more would really be necessary.
 
Not sure exactly sure why USGS did it, but I can guess. Surveyors normally install reference points around a primary point that can be used to recreate the primary point in case the primary point is lost or removed. Prior to the start of the GPS era, surveying points were of great value as they were the entire basis for land ownership. George Washington was a surveyor before he was a general and president. The markers on tops of mountains were primarily located at prominent points versus the actual tops of mountains. If those point's locations are known accurately, other points can be located using the reference points. The USGS points can be either vertical or horizontal control.

The general public can do something called recovering a disk. Here is a start to read https://geodesy.noaa.gov/datasheets/ If you want to kill some time, look up the instructions on how to get to the top of Carter Dome and its disk.

Part of my AT corridor monitoring assignment in Maine is to find and visit all the boundary markers in my section and confirm that the secondary points are still present. There are normally three points for each boundary marker, but they are nails in trees and trees die. I have an ap on my phone that is GPS enabled that I can use to locate every boundary marker on the AT from Maine to Georgia. When out in the field, I can update the database for each boundary marker.
 
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Tremont gets a bad rap by some but I enjoy it. Been up there 10 times, mostly during my time as volunteer adopter for Mt. Tremont Trail. That's a bear of a route to maintain. 😂
I bet it was. Every time I go through that middle section, I look at ways to mitigate the mud, then on my way down I just think, hey it's just part of the flavor of the trail, lol. It's a trail that maintains a wild feel to it and that is what I enjoy about it. I've done it in cold and warm weather and both seasons have their charm. The old sign on the top is really on its way out, it's nostalgic for sure, but if they want to have it to guide hikers, it will need replacing sometime in the near future.
 

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I am surprised that AMC has not replaced it and put it up on the annual auction ;)
 
Did it once from 302 and remember being surprised by the gain. Trail starts pretty low.
Probably due an approach from the south, this summer as we rev up redlining again.
 
Tremont's great - a unique view. If all the switchbacks were straightened out, people would still complain. 🤷‍♂️Owl's Cliff is well worth the side trip, IMO.
 
Tremont is actually one of a handful of 3K or higher trailed peaks in NH that I have not done. I really ought to make it my #1 priority hike on this year's trip.
 
Once you have done it, you will wonder why you didnt do it before. Its worth spotting a car and going all the way to Bear Notch Road
 
Once you have done it, you will wonder why you didnt do it before. Its worth spotting a car and going all the way to Bear Notch Road
Well, you've never steered me wrong in the past. I think it was 5 years ago that you suggested the North Moat/Red Ridge loop hike that you recently repeated, and that turned out to be the signature hike of that year for me. I don't see how the Mt Tremont Trail connects to Bear Notch Rd though. I just see the Brunel Trail heading south and then connecting to Sawyer Pond Trail and exiting at the Kanc just west of the entrance to Bear Notch Rd. Is that the route you mean?
 
You can follow the old Rob Brook trail or a series of snowmobile/MTB trails to link up to the Rob Brook trailhead or the Meadowbrook trailhead
 
You got it close, the Brunel trail starts at the summit of Mt Tremont, goes past Owls cliff with a spur to a view, then it comes out on Rob Brook road (FR 35) which is a very well improved logging road (that is gated). Then out via FR 35 to Bear Notch road.

BTW, the hike is nice, but it is the view from the summit that makes it worth it. A nice view over Livermore land of the Grafton County Logging Company https://www.lancerspiritonline.com/34775/showcase/forgotten-new-hampshire-episode-1-livermore/
 
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Tremont is actually one of a handful of 3K or higher trailed peaks in NH that I have not done. I really ought to make it my #1 priority hike on this year's trip.
Me and Shay need Tremont for our round 4 of the 52wav list. If you decide to do it and want company, let me know and we can team up. I would consider the standard route from 302 or the route from Bear notch road, whatever you chose.
 
It would be an honor to hike with you and Shay since I've read about your exploits for some time. My plans are still in flux, but I will probably be in NH in mid-August. If I can figure out how to message you directly thru this site, I will do so and keep you informed of my plans. Keep writing up those trip reports on the 52wav. I read them all. Thanks.
 
You got it close, the Brunel trail starts at the summit of Mt Tremont, goes past Owls cliff with a spur to a view, then it comes out on Rob Brook road (FR 35) which is a very well improved logging road (that is gated). Then out via FR 35 to Bear Notch road.

BTW, the hike is nice, but it is the view from the summit that makes it worth it. A nice view over Livermore land of the Grafton County Logging Company https://www.lancerspiritonline.com/34775/showcase/forgotten-new-hampshire-episode-1-livermore/
Got it. I did not see the faint gray line on the map that must be Rob Brook Rd. Thanks for posting the Livermore piece which was very interesting and rather well done by the students. Is Livermore easily accessible or is like a secret place in the woods?
 
LIvermore is normally readily accessible by car from Sawyer RIver road which currently is closed to auto travel, still open for hikers. There is a private camp at the site of the mansion. IMHO, its best visited after frost before significant snow falls as the undergrowth tends to obscure the extensive ruins of the factory and land forms. Reportedly it was some of the best managed forests that the WMNF purchased.
 
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