Mt. Tremont

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sierra

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Me and my dog Shay made our second ascent of Mt. Tremont on 5-15-23. This climb marks #31 on his second round of the 52wav list. Summer conditions which were much easier than the winter conditions that he had for his first-round ascent. This mountain gets a bad rap in some hiking groups, not really sure why, it's a nice hike if you ask me. I like the valley as you approach, nice river that was running really nice, than you climb up onto a plateau that has a unique forest sandwiched into a narrow-sided valley. Lastly, you make your way up a steepening slope that increases in elevation as you approach the summit. A nice ledge featuring a Pemi view and some northern views as well, the Sandwich range is right before you and it looks like you could chuck a rock into Sawyers Pond if you had a good arm. It's a great peak to avoid the crowds.
 
I need to climb Mt. Tremont at some point. I've heard good things about it. :D
I really enjoy your videos, when you do climb it, can you post a trip report? I would be very interested in your take on the peak. I think it's mostly beginners that don't care for it.
 
Thanks for this report. It's on my list for this summer if I make it to NH. One of the few trailed 3K or higher peaks in NH not on my resume. From what I've heard and read, not everyone likes it. Perhaps they are expecting an easier climb given the 3300 foot elevation? I think the trailhead sits pretty low for the Whites, like around 500 feet if I recall. I second your request to Rhody Seth to video this hike, preferably before I get there. ;)
 
Thanks for this report. It's on my list for this summer if I make it to NH. One of the few trailed 3K or higher peaks in NH not on my resume. From what I've heard and read, not everyone likes it. Perhaps they are expecting an easier climb given the 3300 foot elevation? I think the trailhead sits pretty low for the Whites, like around 500 feet if I recall. I second your request to Rhody Seth to video this hike, preferably before I get there. ;)
I think it's not everyone's cup of tea because most of the elevation gain is compressed into the second half of the hike. Once past the tributary crossing the trail is definitely up up up.

Personally, I love Tremont. I used to maintain Mt. Tremont Trail and have been up there many times.
 
Thanks Ken. BTW, your book is a great resource. I should add that the Mt Tremont Trail trailhead sits at 820 feet of elevation on Rt 302 and is not as low as 500 feet. My bad. I hate giving out incorrect information and I should have looked that up before posting it. It still ranks as one of the lower trailheads.
 
I think it's not everyone's cup of tea because most of the elevation gain is compressed into the second half of the hike. Once past the tributary crossing the trail is definitely up up up.

Personally, I love Tremont. I used to maintain Mt. Tremont Trail and have been up there many times.
I noticed that there are old blue blazes still evident in many places, but yellow is the most used blaze. I know yellow is the standard for trails in the WMNF that do not touch the AT, any idea when they changes from blue to yellow on this trail? I'm just curious on the history. Pretty neat that you used to maintain it, I bet that boggy section up above the river was a pain in the neck, that area is always a mess and there are many side paths to avoid the mud bogs. Could sure use some bog bridges in there.
 
Tremont is a great hike. Never done it from the Bear Notch side. Would like to give that a try.
 
I noticed that there are old blue blazes still evident in many places, but yellow is the most used blaze. I know yellow is the standard for trails in the WMNF that do not touch the AT, any idea when they changes from blue to yellow on this trail? I'm just curious on the history. Pretty neat that you used to maintain it, I bet that boggy section up above the river was a pain in the neck, that area is always a mess and there are many side paths to avoid the mud bogs. Could sure use some bog bridges in there.
Not sure when those blue blazes were done. Quite a long time ago. If I recall, the first one is visible as soon as you start up the trail from the highway.

It was indeed a very challenging trail to maintain!
 
It's wonderful from Bear Notch Road. I saw a coyote before reaching Brunell Trail!

In my opinion, the trip up from Owl's Cliff was much more preferable than the zillion switchbacks coming up from 302.

-Edited to correct the name of the flying critter's cliff. Thanks Dr. D!
 
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Hiked Mt Tremont last summer, expecting it to be another somewhat gentle climb to a 3000 ft peak on the 52WAV list. As Ken pointed out, the second half of the hike was surprisingly steep - but the view of Sawyer Pond at the top was magnificent.
 
It's wonderful from Bear Notch Road. I saw a coyote before reaching Brunell Trail!

In my opinion, the trip up from Eagle Cliff was much more preferable than the zillion switchbacks coming up from 302.
Agreed. But do you mean Owls Cliff? Years ago friend and I spotted a vehicle on Rte 302, then began hike at the end of Sawyer River road for a CCW route past Sawyer Pond to Brunel Trail. Hot day and we had to ration water as we did not carry enough.
 
You got me interested, its one of the few mountains in the Whites I never got around to, a penalty for not doing lists. I had a blood donation scheduled this afternoon in Conway, so I gave the trail from RT 302 a try today. Quite a nice hike, it is probably a good place to send someone for just the hike along the cascades. Looking at the upper trail past the last watercrossing, I see the work of a skilled trail builder. Take a look the Grafton Loop trail approach to Mt Speck from the south and its quite similar. Yes switchbacks can get monotonous but if built right they minimize erosion on steep slopes. Sure there are some washouts but my guess this trail has been around for a while. The only thing missing would be stone waterbars at the end of each switchback but in most cases, they were really not needed.

I had my handsaw with me and removed one blowdown down along the brook and partially minimized another PITA one down to a lesser step over. I had left two along the stream for on the way down but ran out of time. There is one big softwood across the trail with a go around route being established above where the trail leaves the original stream and old logging road and cuts across a very flat plateau. It would need an ax or a much larger saw than mine. Trail was mostly dry, a few damp spots but expect they will be gone soon.
 
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You got me interested, its one of the few mountains in the Whites I never got around to, a penalty for not doing lists. I had a blood donation scheduled this afternoon in Conway, so I gave the trail from RT 302 a try today. Quite a nice hike, it is probably a good place to send someone for just the hike along the cascades. Looking at the upper trail past the last watercrossing, I see the work of a skilled trail builder. Take a look the Grafton Loop trail approach to My Speck from the south and its quite similar. Yes switchbacks can get monotonous but if built right they minimize erosion on steep slopes. Sure there are some washouts but my guess this trail has been around for a while. The only thing missing would be stone waterbars at the end of each switchback but in most cases, they were really not needed.

I had my handsaw with me and removed one blowdown down along the brook and partially minimized another PITA one down to a lesser step over. I had left two along the stream for on the way down but ran out of time. There is one big softwood across the trail with a go around route being established above where the trail leaves the original stream and old logging road and cuts across a very flat plateau. It would need an ax or a much larger saw than mine. Trail was mostly dry, a few damp spots but expect they will be gone soon.
What continues to amaze me is how less eroded these trails are to the less popular peaks.
 
Less grid activity? IMO the majority of trail damage happens in spring. My guess is the 52 with View Grid is less of a thing than the conventional Grid?
 
You got me interested, its one of the few mountains in the Whites I never got around to, a penalty for not doing lists. I had a blood donation scheduled this afternoon in Conway, so I gave the trail from RT 302 a try today. Quite a nice hike, it is probably a good place to send someone for just the hike along the cascades. Looking at the upper trail past the last watercrossing, I see the work of a skilled trail builder. Take a look the Grafton Loop trail approach to My Speck from the south and its quite similar. Yes switchbacks can get monotonous but if built right they minimize erosion on steep slopes. Sure there are some washouts but my guess this trail has been around for a while. The only thing missing would be stone waterbars at the end of each switchback but in most cases, they were really not needed.

I had my handsaw with me and removed one blowdown down along the brook and partially minimized another PITA one down to a lesser step over. I had left two along the stream for on the way down but ran out of time. There is one big softwood across the trail with a go around route being established above where the trail leaves the original stream and old logging road and cuts across a very flat plateau. It would need an ax or a much larger saw than mine. Trail was mostly dry, a few damp spots but expect they will be gone soon.
That's really awesome! I love many of these "less traveled" trails. The day that I hike Tremont, I only saw 2-3 people all day.
 
The Brunel trail up Mt Tremont from the south off of Bear Notch road sounds like its trail only a White Mountain Trails Finisher would love Trails

The last report I found quickly for that trail described it as barely maintained trail best done with a GPS track.
 
Less grid activity? IMO the majority of trail damage happens in spring. My guess is the 52 with View Grid is less of a thing than the conventional Grid?
I only know of one person who has done a 52WAV grid (it's not a regular thing like the 4K grid is); they also did a single-season winter 52WAV.
 
The last report I found quickly for that trail described it as barely maintained trail best done with a GPS track.
Brunel used to be difficult to follow but when I last walked it for the WMG it was in good shape. It sees far less traffic than Mt. Tremont Trail though.
 
Brunel used to be difficult to follow but when I last walked it for the WMG it was in good shape. It sees far less traffic than Mt. Tremont Trail though.
Thanks Ken, good to hear of a trail to get away from the crowds some weekend. Also interesting to know that the Brunel trail is in good shape.

We can can hope that the 52 VAW grid does not take off like the grid;)
 
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